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Year:

Socorro Independent School District
2015-2016

Vision
Tomorrow's Leaders Learning Today
Mission Statement
The mission of the Socorro Independent School District is to optimize our students’ academic, artistic, athletic, and interpersonal skills.
Board of Trustees
ANGELICA RODRIGUEZ, PRESIDENT
ANTONIO "TONY" AYUB, VICE-PRESIDENT
GARY GANDARA, SECRETARY
HECTOR F. GONZALEZ, TRUSTEE
PAUL GUERRA, TRUSTEE
CYNTHIA ANN NAJERA, TRUSTEE
MICHAEL ANTHONY NAJERA, TRUSTEE
Superintendent
DR. JOSE A ESPINOZA
Comprehensive Needs Assessment

SISD001

Introduction

The Socorro Independent School District is located in the southeastern portion of El Paso County, Texas. It serves Socorro, Horizon City, and the eastern portion of the City of El Paso. The District covers 136 square miles of El Paso County. The District's northern boundary is the Texas/New Mexico line. Its southern boundary is the Rio Grande River. It is part of Texas Education Agency Region XIX.

Socorro I.S.D. is one of the fastest growing school districts in the state of Texas. The District has twenty-two(22) elementary schools, six (6) PK-8 schools, nine (9) middle schools, six (6) high schools, two (2) specialty campuses, one (1) elementary-level Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) campus, one (1) secondary-level DAEP, one (1) Early Childhood Center, and a community education program. The Student Activities Complex includes an 11,000-seat stadium, and the adjacent Aquatic Center, also open throughout the year, has indoor and outdoor pools.

The Socorro Independent School District is proud to be recognized throughout the state of Texas as an innovative educational leader. With over 45,000 students, Socorro is one of the largest Year-Round school districts in Texas. The District's calendar features two-week breaks in the fall and spring as well as a two-week break during December.

Contributing to student success, we are fortunate to have a strong and supportive community. As a District, we believe it is vital that we work together in partnership with parents, local businesses, institutions of higher education, and our corporate community. Working together, we can ensure the continued growth and success of our wonderful District.

The Socorro District Improvement Plan (DIP) is prepared in accordance with requirements of Chapter 11, Subchapter F, of the Texas Education Code, specifically 11.251 and 11.252. These requirements are also contained in SISD policies BQ (Legal) and BQA (Legal).

Each school district shall have a district improvement plan that is developed, evaluated, and revised annually, in accordance with district policy, by the Superintendent with the assistance of the district-level committee. The purpose of the district improvement plan is to guide district and campus staff in the improvement of student performance for all student groups in order to attain state standards in respect to academic excellence indicators.

The district is required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 to implement the following 10 Title I Schoolwide components:

In addition to the 10 components, the following items are addressed within the framework of the Socorro District Improvement Plan: a) long range goals; b) measurable performance objectives; c) strategies for improvement of student performance in support of objectives; d) staff responsible for accomplishing strategies; e) specific timelines for implementation of each strategy; f) state and federal resources used to implement strategies g) evidence of strategy implementation; h) evidence of strategy impact; i) formative; and j) summative evaluation criteria.

In developing the 2015-2016 DIP, the SISD Educator's Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC), comprised of members representing all campuses, along with members from the community, parents, business, and central office, met to review district strengths and needs, as well as propose changes.

In addition to meeting state and federal rules and regulations, the 2015-2016 DIP aligns directly with the Socorro ISD Policies established by the Board of Trustees. Accordingly, monitoring of the strategies included in the DIP is accomplished through ongoing monitoring of the district policies and performance indicators. Furthermore, goals from each of the campus improvement plans are aligned directly with the DIP. Law has established that the district plan and campus plans be the primary record supporting expenditures attributed to the State Compensatory Education Program.

In its effort to prepare its students for the future, the Socorro Independent School District utilizes numerous research-based programs and activities. While maintaining fidelity to those that have proven successful, the District also investigates and implements many innovative programs at the very forefront of modern education in order to address the board-adopted district goals.

District Improvement Plan Long Range Goals

Goal 1: SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.

Goal 2: SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.

Goal 3: SISD will recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified faculty, staff, and support personnel to improve student academic performance and to ensure that students graduate college and career ready.

Goal 4: SISD will build positive parent, business, and community partnerships to ensure the academic success of students by engaging in collaborative district and campus-level activities; by connecting regularly via numerous means of communication; and by providing regular access to current educational information.

Goal 5: For increased accountability, SISD district leaders, campus leaders, faculty, and staff members will ensure that students receive a quality education by working collaboratively towards the fulfillment of educational goals at the federal, state, and district level.

PERFORMANCE-BASED MONITORING ANALYSIS SYSTEM (PBMAS)

The Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS) is a federal statute that guides the Texas Education Agency (TEA) in its monitoring of students served in programs that are supported by state and federal funds. Programs included are: Special Education, Bilingual Education, Career & Technical Education, and No Child Left Behind. The essential nature of PBMAS is the use of an indicator system to ensure that these students are being properly served and that the funding is being utilized effectively. Data examined under PBMAS comes from a variety of sources, which includes: Student assessment data including STAAR data obtained from data sets produced by the Student Assessment Division of TEA, Dropout & graduation data from Division of Accountability Research, Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS), AYP & Graduation data from Performance Reporting Division, and PEIMS Data from PEIMS Division.

SYSTEM SAFEGUARDS

System Safeguards are part of the new accountability system implemented in Texas whereby schools and districts must meet academic standards and targets based on an index, ensuring academic growth for all student populations. Performance Indicators are population-specific standards established that school and districts must meet as part of the work towards ensuring academic growth for all.

Districts and schools that have not met the System Safeguard standards must participate in the Texas Accountability Intervention System (TAIS), which outlines specific actions that must be taken in order to improve student academic performance.

Those participating in the Texas Accountability Intervention System must:

For the 2014-2015 school year, SISD campuses failed to meet System Safeguard requirements specifically for English Language Learners and Special Education students. SISD's District Leadership Team (DLT) convened to follow TAIS guidelines and create a plan of action to support low performing campuses and to utilize funding set aside specifically for professional development. The School Improvement Officer worked specifically to help campuses analyze their student data to target areas for improvement. This project is still in operation at SISD and schools in need are provided with support from the Academic Services Department.

In order to provide support for Special Education students with regard to PBMAS shortcomings and to provide a stronger framework of pedagogy for them, there is a need to acquire training in co-teaching models. The notion is to strengthen the methods by which Regular Education and Special Education teachers collaborate and execute the delivery of content to students. The sending of district personnel to the "National Train-the-Trainer Institute: Co-Teaching That Works" program has been planned, which will be held in Boston, Massachusetts in December of 2015.

CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION DEPARTMENTS

Academic Services

The Academic Services Department is dedicated to the academic, artistic, athletic, and interpersonal development of all student populations and works towards the achievement of the goals set forth by the District's Strategic Plan. Encompassing the departments of Advanced Academics, Bilingual/ESL Education, Gifted and Talented, Grants, Guidance and Counseling, Instructional Support, Research and Evaluation, Special Education, and State and Federal Programs, it strives to coordinate its resources and actions towards the improvement of the lives of students.

Advanced Academics / Gifted and Talented

The purpose of Advanced Academics is to offer classes and differentiated programs for middle and high school students who may not be identified as gifted but require a rigorous curriculum. The Department offers a variety of advanced courses touching on all content areas at SISD high schools.

The SISD Gifted and Talented program directs an educational program that identifies, nurtures, and challenges the abilities of gifted students to a maximum capacity, thereby expanding their potential in order for identified students to realize areas of their contribution to self and society. The ultimate goal of the Gifted and Talented program at SISD is to develop within a student the desire for excellence and self-directed learning, thinking, research and communication and a sense of individual responsibility to the school community and the community at large.

Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language

The Bilingual/English as a Second Language Department strives to provide every English Language Learner (ELL) student equal access to the English curriculum and ensure all students succeed. The Bilingual/English as a Second Language Department provides instructional support in the implementation of the English Language Proficiency Standards and Sheltered Instruction in grades Pk-12. The Department provides support in all content areas for teachers to better support lesson delivery for student success. Additionally, the Department provides guidance to campus administrators and support staff in the areas of LPAC and TELPAS. Most importantly, the Department strives to support teachers to provide equal access to the English curriculum and ensure that all students succeed. Along with other departments, collaboration is key to ensure all students are provided with instructional tools and resources to be successful. Professional development is provided to teachers based on needs and, moreover, to enrich a classroom environment that will provide optimal learning for an ELL student. Teachers will learn new instructional strategies to meet the various needs of the ELL student.

Career and Technical Education

Career and Technical Education strives to provide opportunities for students to participate in advanced Programs of Study to promote leadership, skills development and a seamless transition to post-secondary education and/or work. Its goals are to provide opportunities for all students through a rigorous Career & Technical Education program, to provide a quality academic counseling and career guidance program for all students, and to provide sustainable partnerships with business and industry for current and emerging occupations. Career and Technical Education is a vital component of the high school curriculum. For many students, it represents as much as a third of their high school experience. It is a critical component in meeting the needs of students in academic achievement, career exploration, career preparation, and leadership development. Successful transition to postsecondary education, work, and/or the military is one of the goals of SISD's educational system.

Elementary Education

The Elementary Education Department provides curriculum and instruction support in the implementation of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in grades K-5 and the Pre-K Curriculum Guidelines. The Department provides information and guidance in the following content and program areas: Early Childhood Education, Language Arts and Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Assessment Literacy, Texas Math Initiative, and the Texas Reading Initiative. Additionally, the Department provides information to school administrators and teachers regarding professional development offerings and meeting the learning needs of students through 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 74. In collaboration with the other departments within Instructional Services, the Elementary Education Department works to ensure academic success of all students in the Socorro Independent School District.

Guidance and Counseling

The mission of the Socorro ISD school Guidance and Counseling program is to provide a comprehensive developmental program that will maximize the academic, personal-social, and career competencies of all students so that they may realize personal post-secondary goals. The Department's fundamental beliefs are that all students are important, have the right to participate in the school counseling program, and deserve the opportunity to achieve to their fullest potential. It also believes that students' ethnic, cultural, sexual differences, and special needs must be considered in planning and implementing the school counseling program and that all students shall have access to a full-time, certified, master's degree level school counselor.

Instructional Support Department

The Instructional Support Department is charged with implementing curriculum alignment vertically and horizontally districtwide to foster accelerated student achievement, instructional capacity building for teachers, and leadership capacity building for principals and assistant principals within each feeder pattern. It also assists principals in developing climates of excellence and effective engagement with parents and community and supports principal accountability for academic growth and attendance.

Its major responsibilities include: a) ensuring that each campus improves student performance and meets state and federal performance standards; b) ensuring improvement of the quality of instruction and teacher's ability to teach with high levels of engagement and rigor; c) ensuring that each campus within the feeder pattern has a healthy climate and culture; d) directing, supporting, and monitoring principals to mold them into effective instructional leaders through coaching and professional development.

It also seeks to lead and support campus leaders to ensure that the district's instructional and curricular programs, assessments, and pedagogical approaches are fully and appropriately implemented in all assigned campuses. It moves to organize and support professional learning communities for principals, focused on improving teaching and learning; meet regularly to collaboratively develop professional learning experiences and plans for improvement, ensure and support assigned campuses to develop and implement campus improvement plans designed to maintain continuous progress in student achievement, and meet the targeted district goals set forth in the District Improvement Plan.

The Instructional Support Department also conducts regular campus visits that include conferring with varied members of the campus leadership team, reviewing campus data, assessing student achievement progress and continuously creating academic programs to guide campus support in professional development needs. Team meets regularly with the Superintendent of Schools, assistant superintendents, and Chief Academic Officer and other designated central office staff to discuss campus progress, review data, and identify professional development budgetary supports and resources needed to assist campus staff to improve teaching and learning. It seeks to ensure assigned campuses comply with TEA, state, federal, and school board policies and laws.

The Instructional Support Team develops procedures to address the following: attendance for students and teachers, dropout rates, graduation rates, college readiness, grade placement, and student success initiatives. It also develops procedures to ensure an increase in the number of students enrolled in honors and Advanced Placement classes. It seeks to ensure parent and community involvement on assigned campuses; ensure that principals understand and implement district policies and procedures for maintaining safe and secure environments or students; establish a collaborative relationship with all departments and divisions to ensure support of local campus academic, fiscal, training and facility needs; and finally to direct the development and maintenance of such records and reports as are necessary to keep the Superintendent of Schools, Board of Trustees and other executive staff informed of the district’s progress and future plans.

In the effort to maintain high standards for the children of Socorro ISD, the Department of Instructional Support offers a variety of opportunities for teacher growth and learning. Teachers are able to choose from a variety of staff development opportunities through Socorro ISD and approved providers that positively affect student learning. New teachers with zero years’ experience are provided the opportunity to participate in our New Teacher Induction Academy – Becoming Friends for tomorrow’s Future (BFF) prior to the first day of school. They are also provided a mentor for the year through of Teacher Mentor Program. This year long teacher program, provides the new teacher with varied opportunities to observe quality teaching, attend professional development tailored to their individual needs and grade level, communicate regularly with an assigned mentor in the same grade level and from the same grade level and from the same campus. Their teacher support is consistent throughout the district and continuous all year long.

The Instructional Support Department, led by the SISD School Improvement Officer, also provides School Improvement and Leadership Development support and implements curriculum alignment vertically and horizontally throughout the District to foster accelerated student achievement, instructional capacity building for teachers, and leadership capacity building for principals and assistant principals. It also assists principals in developing climates of excellence and effective engagement with parents and community and supports principal accountability for academic growth and attendance.

With regard to School Improvement and Leadership Development, the department's major responsibilities include: a) ensuring that each campus improves student performance and meets state and federal performance standards; b) ensuring improvement of the quality of instruction and teacher's ability to teach with high levels of engagement and rigor; c) ensuring that each campus within the feeder pattern has a healthy climate and culture; d) directing, supporting, and monitoring principals to mold them into effective instructional leaders through coaching and professional development.

It also seeks to lead and support principals to ensure that the district's instructional and curricular programs, assessments, and pedagogical approaches are fully and appropriately implemented in all assigned campuses. It moves to organize and support professional learning communities for principals, as well as participate directly in such learning; professional learning communities are focused on improving teaching and learning. Part of its purpose is to supervise and evaluate the performance of principals in assigned feeder pattern; meet regularly with principals to collaboratively develop professional learning experiences and plans for improvement and ensure and support assigned campuses to develop and implement campus improvement plans designed to maintain continuous progress in student achievement and meet the targeted district goals set forth in the District Improvement Plan.

Regular campus visits are conducted that include conferring with principals, reviewing campus improvement plans and assessing student achievement progress. It uses student and campus data to develop and provide professional development for administrators and teachers. It also meets regularly with the Superintendent of Schools, assistant superintendent, and chief of schools and other designated central office staff to discuss campus progress, review data, and identify professional development budgetary supports and resources needed to assist campus staff to improve teaching and learning. It seeks to ensure assigned campuses comply with TEA, state, federal, and school board policies and laws.

Secondary Education

The Secondary Education Department provides curriculum and instruction support in the implementation of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in grades 6-12. The department provides information and guidance in the following content and program areas: Language Arts and Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Assessment Literacy, Texas Math Initiative, and the Texas Reading Initiative. Additionally, the department provides information to school administrators and teachers regarding professional development offerings and meeting the learning needs of students through Region 19 TAC Chapter 74. In collaboration with the other departments within Academic Services, the Secondary Education Department works to ensure academic success of all students in the Socorro Independent School District. The mission of the Secondary Education Department is to support student success through the delivery of an aligned, guaranteed curriculum for every secondary student in the Socorro Independent School District. One of its primary goals is to improve the quality of education for all students by providing leadership in the development and implementation of instructional programs, so strong and inviting, that every student will be prepared and motivated to successfully complete challenging course work and continue their education beyond high school graduation.

Special Education

The Special Education Department provides service and support to campuses and students so students receive a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. In addition to instructional services, related services are also provided to students who have an identified need. The Special Education Department provides campuses and staff with support for the inclusion of special education students in grade level instructional programs and provides support to the assessment staff to implement appropriate evaluations. The Department also provides opportunities for staff development so all personnel in the District will understand issues regarding students with disabilities. The Department strives to recognize areas of special need for students and seeks to provide improved transitional supports as they prepare for adulthood. It offers services to parents of students with disabilities and support for District and Regional Special Olympics.

State and Federal Programs

The Department of State and Federal Programs exists for the purpose of meeting the requirements under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and State Compensatory Education. The primary function of NCLB is to close the achievement gap between groups of students by (1) requiring greater accountability - for student performance; (2) focusing on what works - scientifically-based research, high quality teachers and paraprofessional qualifications; and (3) empowering parents – capacity building of schools and parents. The goal of the State Compensatory Education (SCE) Program is to provide a challenging and meaningful instructional program to close the achievement gap between children at risk of dropping out of school and their peers. To meet this goal, the Socorro Independent School District uses student performance data to design and implement appropriate compensatory, intensive, or accelerated instructional services that enable them to be performing at grade level at the conclusion of the school year.

In addition to implementing positions, programs, strategies, and/or activities that are supplemental to the basic instructional program funded throughs SCE dollars, the Department examines data to improve academic performance through direct instructional services to students at risk of dropping out of school.

To ensure at-risk students are receiving a meaningful and effective program, SISD funds supplemental positions such as an instructional specialist, curriculum coaches, reading and lab teachers, instructional aides, and social workers. SCE funded personnel participate in professional development that are both related and beneficial to the State Compensatory Education program. Professional development is not only key, but essential for the delivery of instructional services for at-risk students.

Additionally, the District evaluates and documents the effectiveness of the SCE program and determines which funded strategies are successful at raising academic standards. If the programs and/or services that are provided to reduce any disparity in academic performance are unsuccessful, the SCE resources are redirected.

Due to increased accountability, systems are in place to document the various SCE supplemental programs and or services that are undertaken by the District. The Department maintains documents such as improvement plans, signed job descriptions, purchase orders, FTE lists, personnel action forms, time sheets, transportation logs, time and effort logs, lesson plans, and at risk student rosters to justify the use of SCE funding. For professional development, auditable documents include sign-in sheets, agendas, and evaluations.

SISD SUPPORT DEPARTMENTS

Administrative Services

The Department of Administrative Services strives to provide a safe and healthy environment for all students, staff, and community members in a professional and friendly manner. SISD, through this department, has implemented the School Choice Option (Title IX, Sec. 9532). The School Choice Option states that the District, by receiving money under NCLB, must implement a policy for the following:

A student attending a persistently dangerous public elementary school or secondary school (as determined by the Texas Education Agency or a student who becomes the victim of a violent criminal offense while in or on the grounds of a public elementary or secondary school that the student attends, is offered and allowed to attend a safe public elementary or secondary school within the District, including a public charter school.

The Department of Administrative Services works with the Department of Police Services (and other district entities) to respond to student, parent, community, and campus concerns in this regard.

Financial Services

The Department of Financial Services is committed to helping provide the finest education to all students through its support efforts. Financial Services consists of the Payroll, Purchasing, Information Services, Budget & Business Services departments. Its goals are to provide training and guidance to all departments and campuses, assist all campuses and departments in following all the necessary state federal and local regulations, and serve the district in all aspects of education as needed.

Human Resources

The Human Resources Department supports the District's goals and objectives by providing quality and timely service to all stakeholders assuring respect and confidentiality. The Department actively assists administrators in recruiting, hiring, and retaining the necessary highly-qualified personnel for their campuses and/or departments; assists district administrators in implementing district policy and procedures through timely training; assists in the development of employees' potential through educational opportunities provided by local and Title II funds; and assures a safe workplace that is free of any form of harassment or discrimination.

Police Services

The Department of Police Services works toward a common district goal of developing students who excel academically, who reason and solve problems rationally, and act responsibly by displaying good character and citizenship. Officers are licensed Peace Officers of the State of Texas, they have full arrest powers and all rights similar to municipal and county police officers. Additionally, the Department has an Investigations Unit, a K-9 Unit and a Community Outreach Program. The officers who are designated as School Resource Officers (SRO's) are assigned to the high schools and middle schools. Our officers specialize in establishing a one-on-one rapport with students, parents, and staff to ensure that they have a positive experience with law enforcement.

Technology Services

Socorro Independent School District has a robust technology infrastructure that meets the demands of students, staff and administrative technological challenges. The District's technological systems and tools are successfully supported, managed, secured and reliable through our seven divisions under the Department of Technology Services: Systems Administration, Database Administration, Technical Services, Infrastructure and Security, Erate and Network Communications. Department of Technology Services is committed to providing equal access to technology for all students and the integration of technology into all areas of curriculum.

The SISD Climate Survey

During the 2014-2015 school year, SISD Superintendent Dr. José Espinoza again implemented the use of the SISD Climate Survey, specifically created to gather information about the perceptions of district stakeholders. The purpose of the Climate Survey is to provide direction for the district, first and foremost, in raising student academic achievement, and, secondly, to improve upon itself in response to the overall perception of its constituents. Quite simply, the basic premise is "how is the district doing?" The results of the Climate Survey provide a starting point for the district to respond to the needs of its parents, students, and employees. While Dr. Espinoza, the Department of Technology Services, and the Department of Public Relations comprehensively presented the Climate Survey and its results in a formal release, the district-level results pages have been extracted and are displayed below. SISD campuses may post their own survey results within their own online campus improvement plans.

To improve things such as customer service, district and campus administrators met with their teams to respond to the results of the survey, examining items that were reported as favorable as well as things that were reported as needing improvement.

Climate Survey Parents

Climate Survey Elementary Students

Climate Survey Secondary Students

Climate Survey Employees

SISD State Assessment Scores Comparison

For the 2014-2015 school year, the Socorro Independent School District demonstrated veritable overall gains in many areas with regard to state assessment scores. While support is still needed to help students improve in certain content areas, the scores indicate that the District's programs and action efforts are headed in a favorable direction. The scores below, taken from a 3rd-8th grade aggregate report by SISD's Department of Research and Evaluation, provide the District with a pathway with which to shift priority attention to areas of need. District-wide courses of action with regard to state assessment scores are detailed in the "Strengths and Needs" section that appears immediately after the scores.

01 2015 Spring Reading

02 2015 Spring Writing

03 2015 Spring Science

04 2015 Spring Social Studies

PROGRAM STRENGTHS AND NEEDS BY DEPARTMENT AND SUBPROGRAMS

Academic Services Department

Intent and Purpose

The primary goal of the Academic Services Department is to ensure cohesive interaction between its sub-departments towards providing positive and fulfilling educational experiences for students. While the Department strives to fulfill the academic needs of students, the Department also strives to provide well-rounded growth for students, consciously aware of their physiological and emotional needs as well.

WIN Academy

Intent and Purpose

The ultimate purpose of the WIN Academy (which stands for Work Hard; "I Can Do it" Attitude; Never Give Up) is to ensure that students who have not been successful in a “traditional” school setting will be able to gain two or more years worth of knowledge in a fast track, demanding, flexible education system. It is a student-centered program created to help ensure that all Team SISD children have the opportunities and support needed to achieve academic success.

Needs

A new endeavor for Socorro ISD, there is a need to provide funding, infrastructure, curriculum resources, and professional development support to properly implement the intended model of the WIN Academy. At each of the pilot schools, twenty students from each grade level who have been identified by school leaders and teachers will participate and will receive more one-on-one time with their teachers. In addition, the teachers will stay with the same cohort of students for several years.

For the 15-16 school year, Ten schools will implement the WIN Academy. They are James P. Butler Elementary, Purple Heart Elementary, Jane A. Hambric School, Bill Sybert School, Desert Wind School, Mission Ridge Elementary, Robert R. Rojas Elementary, Campestre Elementary, Hueco Elementary, and Socorro Middle School.

The Fundamental Five

Intent and Purpose

The Fundamental 5 tenets, based on the book of the same name by Sean Cain and Mike Laird, provide a framework for quality instruction that will be used by the district to enhance the learning experiences of students. Campus teams will provide support to teachers by ensuring the following within the framework of instruction:

(taken directly from "The Fundamental 5" by Cain and Laird, ©2011)

Strengths

The inner workings of the Fundamental 5 were previously rolled out to administrators and will now become part of formal training sessions implemented in the district. Noting that the "5" are strongest when implemented together, training teams will educate teachers in order to help them fortify the effectiveness of learning practices in their classes. Training sessions by Mr. Sean Cain have already transpired in the district to infuse the notions and benefits into the minds of district leaders.

Needs

There is a need to provide professional development for teachers in the Fundamental 5. Some campuses have already undertaken the cost of obtaining sessions collectively.

Advanced Academics

Intent and Purpose

Advanced Academics exists for the purpose of helping students work towards achieving their educational and professional aspirations, utilizing personal development activities towards this end. By encouraging educational excellence, the Department seeks to instill healthy ambition within students to better their lives.

--Advancement Via Individual Determination (A.V.I.D.)

Intent and Purpose

College and career readiness is an integral component of Socorro ISD’s mission to ensure students are college bound. As a result, programs such as AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) and SpringBoard are used throughout the district to promote college readiness.

Strengths

The AVID college readiness system provides an opportunity for students in the middle to take part of a support system preparing them for success in post-secondary education. Through the use of the AVID curriculum and the AVID elective class students are taught skills that will provide them with the ability of becoming lifelong learners. The implementation of Writing, Inquiry, Collaboration, Organization, and Reading (WICOR) are essential components of the AVID college readiness system. Students who participate in the AVID elective class take part in tutorials twice a week, where they are mentored by college tutors who facilitate the use of inquiry and problem solving strategies when solving a difficult problem in a specific content class. Students in the AVID system are taught the use of Socratic Seminar, philosophical chairs and metacognition as they build their toolbox of skills for college readiness. Professional development is provided by AVID to teachers who are part of the AVID site team as well as to administrators and counselors who support the AVID system through Summer Institute, Path Trainings and local/divisional trainings. It is the goal that teachers attending AVID professional development, train their peers in AVID best practices, such as Cornell Notes, Tutorials, Socratic Seminars and other instructional strategies, so that those are used school-wide. Students in AVID must show organizational skills by using a binder, calendars, and agendas to support academic self-management. Students in AVID are also required to participate in field trips to universities and colleges, as the goal is for 100 % of AVID students to attend college. Last year, 100% of AVID seniors were matriculated into colleges and universities and 100% of AVID seniors had completed their financial aid packages and taken either the SAT or ACT. AVID students must be enrolled in a rigorous curriculum to become prepared for post –secondary education and must be provided opportunities to take college readiness tests such as PSAT, ReadyStep, SAT and ACT. Partnerships are formed with the AVID state and national staff and they visit AVID sites throughout the school year in order to see the level of implementation of AVID. Parents are invited to meetings at campuses with AVID so that they are knowledgeable and informed of the requirements of the AVID system.

The Springboard Curriculum is the Pre-AP curriculum designed by the CollegeBoard. Students who are enrolled in classes where Springboard is used are provided opportunities to read, write, organize, inquire and collaborate with other students in the classroom. Teachers are provided opportunities for professional development in the use of the Springboard Curriculum. Throughout the school year, SpringBoard staff visit classrooms in order to assess the level of implementation of the Springboard Curriculum and provide feedback to teachers of strengths and needs. The Springboard curriculum is scaffolded and one year builds upon the other. Students who are taught using Springboard generally do much better in assessments and AP courses. Strategies used in Springboard are research based and known as best practices in education.

Needs

There is a need to continue to educate teachers, administrators, counselors in the philosophy of AVID and Springboard. There is a need to continue to support professional development opportunities for both programs in order for teachers to become knowledgeable of best practices and therefore provide students with skills they will need to become successful in colleges and universities. There is a continuous need to provide financial support to campuses so that college tutors are hired for the tutorials in AVID and the AVID elective class. We need to continue to provide opportunities for field trips to colleges and universities to expose students to college life and expectations. We also need to continue to provide students with the opportunity to take college type tests in order to meet requirements for university enrollment. Instructional strategies taught in AVID and SpringBoard need to continue and teachers attending those trainings need to collaborate with the staff at their campus to build capacity. Teachers need to continue to advocate for student access in rigorous college preparatory courses.

AVID has been implemented at the secondary level at SISD. However, in order to build a stronger foundation for AVID, there is a need to provide training for elementary teachers and to show them how AVID strategies already fit into many of our best practices currently utilized by the district. As a result, six elementary schools have been selected, (based on voluntary participation) to pilot AVID at the elementary level. Teachers and administrators at these pilot campuses will need to be trained in the philosophy and strategies which drive AVID Elementary. AVID Elementary will provide students a strong foundation in academic skills that will prepare them for accessing rigorous content. Through the use of WICOR, (writing to learn, inquiry, collaboration, organization, and reading to learn in all content areas) strategies in daily classroom instruction, students will have the opportunity to consistently practice these skills in all content areas.

--Gifted and Talented Program (G.T.)

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Gifted and Talented Program is to ensure that students who are identified as Gifted and Talented in the Socorro Independent School District, are provided with services appropriate to their needs.

Strengths

The Gifted and Talented Program (GT) identifies and serves all qualifying GT students. Qualifying students are eligible to receive appropriate academic support based on the core areas as identified by the Texas Association for Gifted and Talented, (TAGT). Students are provided services where they work together with other GT students, students who are not GT, and independently. Curriculum and instruction is based on student’s needs and is differentiated in order to challenge the GT students in their area of giftedness. GT students are provided opportunities to enroll in Pre-AP, AP, Pre-IB, IB, Dual Credit, AVID and magnet programs throughout the district. The focus is to provide a rigorous curriculum and an array of educational programs in order to prepare the GT student for a post-secondary education and to become a productive member of society.

Opportunities for professional development are provided for teachers of GT students throughout the year in order to ensure they are qualified and knowledgeable on gifted competencies. Trainings focus in the area of nature and needs, social and emotional needs, identification and assessment, differentiated curriculum and creativity and instructional strategies for the gifted learner. Teachers who work with gifted students are required to earn a 30 hour training certificate in the aforementioned competencies. Additionally every year a 6 hour GT update is provided for those teachers who already have the required 30 hour GT awareness training. Counselors and administrators who make decisions which pertain to GT students are also required to attend a 6 hour training focusing on the Nature and Needs of gifted learners. Trainings are offered multiple times throughout the year to ensure educators of the gifted are trained. GT teachers and coordinators are also provided the opportunity to attend other professional development sessions and conferences. The program provides additional resources to GT students, such as laptops, iPads, tablets, iPods, cameras, other equipment and supplies as needed. The students are allowed to use the equipment throughout the academic year in order to work on the academic curriculum and any special projects designed. The students participate in a variety of competitions throughout the year, such as Destination Imagination, Robotics, Team Quest, Academic Decathlon, High Q and others. Educational field trips are also part of the GT services provided. Field trips are focused on units of study which are developed by GT teachers/coordinators and are based on state standards. These outside learning opportunities provide a hands-on approach and application to a unit of study and enhance what is learned in the classroom. Parents are also a large component of the gifted program. Meetings are held both at the District Service Center and at campuses throughout the year to provide parents with information about upcoming opportunities (scholarships, competitions, camps) for gifted children and to keep them involved in ensuring their child’s needs are being met. A yearly district showcase takes place, rotated through the campuses in the district, to show products, projects and performances completed by GT students during the academic school year.

Needs

There is a need to continue to educate teachers, administrators, counselors and board members in regards to the needs of gifted students. Since Socorro ISD is a site based management district, programs vary from school to school and one school might provide better services than another. Administrative support is needed to provide GT services to students who might exhibit low levels of performance on standardized tests. Often-times, these students lose the opportunity of participating in activities designed for GT students as the focus shifts to providing support in the areas where they may have earned a low score in a standardized test. We need to continue to provide support to students through the purchase of technology and also to provide training on its use. Nomination of potentially gifted students needs to continue and students need to be tested with a variety of assessment instruments. We need to continue to train teachers in gifted education so that student’s needs can be met based on their strengths and to allow teachers to attend out of district professional development through conferences, symposiums and regional trainings. We also need to continue to host parent meetings so that parents of GT students are informed regarding their child’s education.

Bilingual / ESL Education

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Bilingual/ESL Program is to provide supplemental resources and support to ensure that children who are limited English proficient attain English proficiency at high levels in core academic subjects to meet state mandated achievement standards.

Strengths

The Bilingual/English as a Second Language Department strives to provide every English Language Learner (ELL) student equal access to the English curriculum and ensure all students succeed. Teachers receive instructional support in the implementation of the English Language Proficiency Standards and Sheltered Instruction in grades PK-12. The department provides support in all content areas for teachers to better support lesson delivery for student success. Additionally, the department provides guidance to campus administrators and support staff in the areas of LPAC and TELPAS. Along with other departments, collaboration is essential to ensure all students are provided with instructional tools and resources to be successful. Professional development such as Sheltered Instruction, differentiation by proficiency, is provided to teachers based on needs and moreover, to enrich a classroom environment that will provide optimal learning for all ELL students. In the past school year, there were over 1,000 teachers that were trained in SIOP. Sheltered Instruction and ELPS trainings will continue to be provided for teachers and administrators. The Bilingual/ESL Department provided training to all coaches at the secondary level to support teachers at the campus level. Trainings will be provided afterschool as refreshers for teachers who have already been trained. Additional two day trainings will be provided to those teachers who have not attended.

The Bilingual/ESL Department is able to fund a minimum of one TIA (temporary instructional aide) with Title III funds to support small group instruction and focused intervention for ELL students. TIAs are beneficial in supporting recent immigrants with the transition into learning English in all content areas. TIAs provide individualized support with learning the new content and language through the use of various resources and tools. A language power kit will be used to maximize learning that is aligned to the TEKS and ELPS to better support student learning.

Students also have access to technology such as iPads, Nooks and laptops that will allow them to enrich their technology learning specifically to assist them while taking STAAR L assessments and TELPAS online reading activities.

IStation is also available to ELL students to support their strengths and weaknesses in the areas of reading for grades K-3. STEMscopes is another tool that ELL students have access to that provides numerous hands-on inquiry activities, intervention and accelerated materials in the area of science.

A K-3 leveled library in Spanish is available at all elementary schools to assist students’ transition from Spanish to English reading skills. These books are lexiled to the students reading ability.

The department also provides guidance to campus LPAC committees to ensure that decisions to support student learning are made in the best interest of the student. The department provides training to campus administrators so monitoring and decision making for ELL students is in compliance with state and federal requirements.

The Bilingual/ESL Department increased parental involvement by providing two initiatives district wide. The Backpack Initiative consists of targeting at-risk ELL students in grades 1st and 3-5. This initiative provided a backpack for parents with lesson plans that were aligned with the TEKS to better enhance the learning structure and environment at home. We provided lessons for parents so they could support their child master the TEKS.

Also, the Latino Family Literacy Project provided support for parents at all campuses. A team of three or four members from each campus received training to be able to provide the instructional strategies to parents during a six (secondary) or ten (elementary) week course. Parents had the opportunity to learn strategies on English vocabulary development, reading skills, literacy skills, and college and career readiness skills. Parents are afforded the opportunity to attend weekly sessions and learn new ideas during each meeting. Also, parents were able to keep a family photo album of the learning that took place in the program.

Needs

There is a great need to continue to monitor the progress of ELL students. Due to the large number of different languages within our district, it is imperative that students are provided with intensive, targeted and explicit instruction to support their transition to English. Specifically with 16 different languages, we must ensure that students have an opportunity to learn in a risk-free learning environment.

The need to have resources such as dictionaries and thesauruses will be critical to student learning. The implementation and use of the English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) during core content areas will be beneficial to both the teacher and the student.

The use of a Temporary Instructional Aide (TIA) will allow students to have the one to one support in the area of need. TIAs are able to focus on students who are newcomers and require additional support. Each TIA is afforded the opportunity to attend monthly professional development to learn second language acquisition skills and how to better serve the needs of our students.

Along with the support of a TIA, it is also important to note that students need access to technology. This allows students to learn in a fun and innovative way. It will support the use of online research, keyboarding, word documents and online practice for assessments such as STAAR L and TELPAS.

A great need is that non-ESL teachers continue to attend professional development in the areas of sheltered instruction and ELPS in order to support the success of ELL students. This need also includes the SCE-I coaches at each campus. An area of need would be specifically for campus clerks. Our clerks need to be fully trained on the entire LPAC process from registration of new students to the entering of data in the new data management system, Tyler Munis. It is important that clerks understand the implications of miscoding students; which can lead to improper placement of classroom and services, to affecting accountability and funding. This support also includes that the campus LPAC administrator continuously attends monthly LPAC meetings. These meetings provide updates to state and federal guidelines that are expected to be carried out by school districts.

Gear Up-Soar

Intent and Purpose

The GEAR UP-SOAR program is a project that SISD has implemented in a partnership with UTEP, designed to increase the number of students who are academically prepared to enter and succeed in post-secondary education. The program focuses on strengthening the academic, technological and critical thinking skills that will be required for students to be college ready for the 21st century workforce. The program embraces the idea that in order for schools to provide a quality education, families and communities must be involved as purposeful partners in the education process.

Strengths

At SISD, the GEAR UP-SOAR program started supporting seventh graders during the 11-12 school year. It will continue to support these students through high school graduation and in their first year of college. SOAR stands for Solutions for Optimal Academic Readiness and GEAR UP stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs. Students in the Socorro Independent School District have been receiving encouragement, support and academic preparation from the UTEP-SISD SOAR GEAR UP Project to ensure they will be ready for college and the workforce when they graduate from high school.

Needs

There is a need to continue the work of GEAR UP-SOAR to support students during the 15-16 school year. The program has experienced success with its cohort of students and continues demonstrate effectiveness in its mission to move students towards a college career.

Guidance and Counseling

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Socorro ISD Department of Guidance and Counseling is to provide resources for school counselors to enable them to be competent, knowledgeable and receptive to the needs of all SISD students. Our intent is to assist school counselors in meeting academic, personal and social needs of students as they prepare to be productive citizens of the 21st century, through training, professional development and networking opportunities throughout the academic year. The mission of the Socorro ISD Department of Guidance and Counseling it to assure SISD school counseling programs provide a comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling program that will maximize the academic, personal-social, and career competencies of all students so that they may realize personal post-secondary goals.

Strengths

The Department of Guidance and Counseling assists SISD school counselors in meeting the academic and career needs of students by providing training and mentoring. Counselors receive training in Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) processes, training on goal setting, HB5, transition and competencies for college and career readiness. All Socorro ISD 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th and 12th graders receive a student transition guide. This guide provides developmental information on academic concerns such as transition from one level to another, preparing a resume and asking for letters of recommendations, course selection and credit calculation, college searches and scholarship and financial aid applications. Six collegiate forums are also provided throughout the year to include: Preparing for College Forum, State Collegiate Forum, National Collegiate Forum, Regional Collegiate Forum, Alumni Collegiate Forum and the Military Collegiate Forum. The forums provide information to students and parents about the college application and financial aid process as well as college life best practices. All 9th-12th graders receive invitations for each forum. The Department of Guidance and Counseling also contracts with Lucha at UT Austin to retrieve transcripts for immigrant students from Mexico. This assures there will be proper course placement. The department also contracts with Span Tran to retrieve and analyze transcript of students from other countries besides Mexico. This also assure proper placement for these students as well. The Department of Guidance and Counseling also provides training and resources to assist school counselors in meeting the personal/social needs of students. The department provides training to counselors on ADDES/BDS (attention and behavioral disorders), grief, trauma, anti-victimization with the WHO (We Help Ourselves) program, conflict resolution, transitioning families, crisis response, suicide interventions and prevention as well as child abuse interventions. SISD school counselors provide classroom guidance lessons to address the above mentioned concerns to increase feelings of safety and security on the campus.

Needs

There is a need to continue to provide classroom guidance lessons to our students in all areas, but specifically in the areas of academic knowledge of HB5 from PK-9th grade. Because of the impact of HB5, school counselors will be supporting students and parents in the new process as well as educating all stakeholders. School counselors will begin the process of assisting students in identifying areas of strengths, areas of growth, likes and dislikes at an earlier age. Interest inventories would be of great assistance in helping students define strengths, needs, likes and dislikes. This will enable students to better match an Endorsement of their choice. The Department of Guidance and Counseling trains school counselors in many interventions and strategies to assist students in handing conflict and being responsible. This is a large part of safety and security on the campus. The Search Institutes 40 Developmental Assets is a program that the department has used for the last four years. The 40 Assets are characteristics that individuals possess and also that be built. The Search Institute has a survey titled “Me and My World.” This survey assesses each student’s competence in one of the 40 Assets. Research proves the more Assets an individual possess, the higher the success rate and lower the rate of indicators such as drop out, teen pregnancy just to name a few. The Department of Guidance and Counseling is in need of funds to purchase the “Me and My World Surveys” so that progress in the development of the 40 Assets can be monitored.

Instructional Support Department

Intent and Purpose

The Instructional Support Department (ISD) Team is dedicated to provide instructional planning, implementation, and reflection support services to all Pre-K to 12th Grade Schools in the Socorro Independent School District. While the focus tends to be in content areas, we also work with other Academic Services Departments such as State and Federal Programs, Bilingual/ESL, Advanced Academics, Special Education, and Research & Evaluation to provide the best support to all schools looking to improve throughout the District.

--Elementary ELAR

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Department of Academics is to plan staff development, analyze data, support teachers, research academics programs that meet the district needs, and ultimately improve student achievement. Our goal is to create lifelong learners, who are both problem solvers and critical thinkers.

Strengths

The SISD Elementary ELAR department has worked to establish and maintain programs that have enhanced reading and writing. The Department of Academics provides strategic professional development to target data-based areas of weakness. We provide professional development to teacher groups, administrators and SCE-I coaches. Trainings take place during the year, after school, intersessions, and Saturdays. We provide groups with materials that help target areas of weakness in writing and reading. We strive to use research-based interventions and instructional materials in all of our presentations.

SISD will continue to use a Balanced Literacy model in grades K-5. The model includes the following components:

In the area of writing, the writing workshop approach is used in grades K-5. Within the writing workshop our schools use a variety of resources that align with the TEKS. We have seen gains in writing this year and currently have a higher passing rate than the state or any district in Region 19. SISD will continue to offer writing training for teachers, administrators, and SCE-I coaches.

SISD monitors student academic growth using district benchmarks, campus common assessments, STAAR, and Istation. Istation serves as the districts universal literacy screener for grades K-3. Istation serves as the screener, intervention support, and progress monitoring.

Istation delivers individualized instruction — complete with age-appropriate content — for pre-K through high school students (Kinder through 5th grade at Longfellow). Plus, every lesson is supported with data-rich benchmark and continuous progress monitoring assessments through Istation's proprietary ISIP™ technology. Depending on the grade level, the English reading curriculum includes education in critical reading domains.

The data sources used by SISD allow schools and the department of academics to plan and provide targeted interventions to address deficiencies in reading and/or writing.

SISD provided further training in writing this year as it was a priority showing a slight decline on the STAAR. SISD launched the Writing Initiative to the necessary steps to increase the writing decline on STAAR. The district administered a writing prompt to kindergarten, first grade, second grade, third grade, and fifth grade students. Schools will use the data to improve writing at all grade levels.

As further support in the area of writing, SCE-I instructional coaches were trained in the writing workshop as part of a four day institute. SCE-I trained teachers during district designated half-day professional development days. All 4th grade teachers were offered the opportunity to attend Empowering Writers training.

Needs

There is a fundamental need to utilize the research-proven, beneficial impact that music instruction has upon the learning of students, particularly at the Pre-Kinder and Kindergarten level (inclusive of all sub-populations). Studies indicate that students who are given instruction in music possess greater phonological awareness, improved cognitive reasoning, and enhanced executive function over students who are not. There is a need for the District to implement a proven music instruction program with this rationale in mind, not only to prompt student success from this early age, but also to negate the incorrect notion that music instruction serves only entertainment purposes. Research into additional educational tools of this nature should continue as well.

There is an absolute need to continue to provide professional development for teachers, SCE-I coaches, and teachers. We have increases in writing, but still have not trained all teachers in the writing workshop. The SISD Writing Academy allowed for a total of three-hundred teachers to attend a four day academy. We will provide all SISD K-8 teachers with an extensive writing workshop training.

SISD will continue to provide quality professional development in the area of reading. The district will work to increase students’ knowledge of genres that include:

Students will also receive targeted instruction to increase Figure 19 percentages on STAAR. Figure 19 standards are currently aligned K-12 and we will continue to address questioning in classrooms and find other resources that will yield student success.

There is a need for the District to continue to provide resources to support struggling students. A major priority will be to support students with research-based interventions that are engaging and close performance gaps.

SISD will continue to support past initiatives such as:

There is a need to utilize SCE-I coaches in all schools in order to support teachers and students. The SCE-I coaches assigned to all elementary schools assist teachers during planning and they provide staff development. The coaches also tutor small groups and are an overall benefit to SISD. Coaches need to remain a vital member of all grade level planning sessions.

--Secondary ELAR

---Reading

Strengths

Over the course of the three years of STAAR, scores in reading have increased steadily. Teachers have now become more aware of the different genres tested, and they have also come to understand the significant role that Figure 19 plays in the STAAR reading test. In addition, thanks in part to the release of the Spring 2013 STAAR tests, teachers better understand the types of questions that they exam asks, as well as understanding the level of rigor and complexity of the questions on the test.

Needs

Despite the steady gains, much work is to be done. Next school year, the standards are expected to increase on the STAAR tests. Therefore, significant gains need to be made to meet the new standards. An emphasis needs to be on the following reading components: Figure 19, close reading, genre studies (with a focus on expository texts, poetry, and how to address every genre tested in an equitable manner), text dependent questions, and short answer responses.

Programs/Professional Development

The following programs are expected to be continue to be implemented for struggling readers: IStation (which is funded by the state for middle school campuses) and Read 180/System 44.

The following professional development needs to be provided to teachers: close reading, text dependent questioning, genre studies, and writing effective responses to short answer questions.

---Writing

Strengths

The awareness of the importance of writing has surfaced to the top. Teachers and administrators alike have come to understand the value that the state has placed on writing. The ante has been raised via the STAAR Writing exams. Efforts to change writing instruction have been made to improve the writing scores over the last three years of STAAR.

Needs

Although awareness and efforts to improve writing instruction have been made, STAAR writing scores have improved minimally. Students are not being led through the writing process, and they are also not being given mentor texts to follow, and they are also not receiving feedback on improving their writing.

Programs/Professional Development

The Empowering Writers approach was implemented at the elementary level, and was introduced to some secondary campuses. This program brought about significant gains by two middle school campuses that implemented Empowering Writers. Providing teachers with the Empowering Writers approach will improve their writing instruction delivery. In addition, the state of Texas is offering a summer institute for DSC ELAR staff: Write for Texas. This institute will target writing at the secondary level. Finally, the majority of the secondary campuses offer some type of intervention/support writing course for students. Teachers who teach the course need guidance and support in regards to teaching the course. Therefore, a writing teacher network will be created in order to provide teachers with the support they need to teach the course effectively.

--Elementary Mathematics

Intent and Purpose

The intent and purpose of Academic Services (Instructional Officer Elementary Math) is to provide students in grades K-5 a rigorous, standards-based Mathematics education that is research-based and engaging. Our goal is to create lifelong learners, who are both problem solvers and critical thinkers.

Strengths

Socorro ISD is in the 2nd year of Guided Math Framework implementation in grades K-5th. The Guided Math Framework offers a daily menu of instruction from which teachers can choose based on the needs of their students and upon the standards being taught. The framework allows teachers in grades K-5 to align their current campus and district resources into the framework. Guided Math addresses the various learning needs and styles of students.

The Guided Math framework is composed of seven components:

The 2015-2016 school year will be the third full year of implementation. The Academic Services Department will continue to provide follow up professional development sessions at a district level. Any and all district purchased resources will be aligned to at least one of the seven components of the Guided Math Framework. This upcoming school year Academic Services will begin to conduct support observations and provide campuses feedback. The new math TEKS and the Pearson EnVision Math textbook for grades K-5 will be aligned to fit the Guided Math framework. At this time, SISD funds Target the Question a unique problem-solving program that uses weekly problem scenarios with daily, color-coded questions. After using this supplementary math program for 10-15 minutes each day, students will be able to find needed information, eliminate extraneous information and effectively use problem-solving strategies. In order to track student success, SISD uses TCM Progress Monitoring assessments. These are custom created tests that are aligned to the new Math TEKS for grades K-5. Each assessment consists of 15 questions and the structure of each test is based on the STAAR assessment blueprint. The BOY (beginning of the year) test is aligned to the TRS (TEKS Resource System) sequenced TEKS that are taught during 1st 9-weeks period. The MOY (middle of the year) test is aligned to the TRS sequenced TEKS that are taught during the 1st and 2nd 9-weeks period. The EOY (end of the year) test is aligned to the TRS sequenced TEKS that have been taught all school year. The assessments are used to progress monitor students in grades K-5 and the data collected for grades K-2 is used for At-Risk coding purposes. This is currently the only TEKS aligned progress monitoring assessment provided by the district.

Needs

There is a need to continue to address the needs of the students of SISD, in regards to math instruction in grades K-5. Over the past two years SISD STAAR scores have been increasing, but there are many changes that are going to take place this upcoming 2015-2016 school year. Some of the changes that are taking place are as follows; implementation of the new 2012 Math TEKS in grades K-8, new STAAR Math Assessed Curriculum and Blueprint for grades 3-8, the increase of math process standards that will be dual coded with content standards and the possibility of moving into Phase II passing standards.

There is a need to address students’ problem solving skills, the state has already informed districts that the amount of tested processing skills will increase. There is an immediate need for additional resources and professional development in this area. During the upcoming school year, teachers will be teaching and learning the new math standards and there will be a need to support them through resources, planning time and professional development. The target of this support would be to increase teacher content knowledge in regards to the new TEKS and their teaching implications. By supporting teachers through these efforts this will allow for higher rates of student success. The state has added the Personal Financial Literacy TEKS strand, and this is a strand that has never been taught in a mathematical capacity in the past. The implications of this are the district will need to provide additional support in this area. Teachers will need to become familiar with the student expectations and locating resources that address the standards. There is also a current need to address the use of manipulatives in the classroom across all grade level spans. Teachers still need additional support on how to properly utilize these resources to address the needs of our students in the areas of Computations and Algebraic Reasoning. Students of SISD are also in need of resources and programs that address mathematical fluency. The state has added the word “fluently” to many of the new standards, which will require our students to recall and recite their facts instantaneously. There has also been a change in the STAAR assessed curriculum and STAAR blueprint. There has been a shift in the testing focus, there is now a focus on Computations and Algebraic Reasoning. As a district we need to prepare our students for this shift as well, we can do this by provided staff development and resources to teachers, SCEI coaches and administrators. As a result of the improvement in scores, we must continue with the Guided Math framework, Lone Star digital problem solving resource, and administering a progress monitoring assessment that is aligned to the new standards.

--Secondary Mathematics

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Math Instructional Officer position is to raise student achievement by creating systemic change aligned to the District’s vision and mission. This is accomplished by supporting the application of research-based instructional practices, providing staff development to deepen content knowledge, promoting understanding of state standards and their cross-curricular relationships, as well as strengthening instructional approaches. Data are analyzed to assess the effectiveness of initiatives, design and evaluate professional development, and set long term goals. This position is especially critical to math teachers as the new and quite different Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) are implemented within a comprehensive accountability system.

Strengths

  1. Professional Development: The Math Instructional Officer designed and delivered a wide variety of professional development workshops geared toward teachers, coaches, and administrators. Each professional development is based on data to ensure that high needs areas are addressed. The primary data source is STAAR. Other data includes staffing (teachers’ experience, instructional and classroom management skills, and content knowledge), previous professional development efforts and levels of implementation, and anecdotal/observational data. STAAR data is disaggregated to determine the performance levels of schools and student groups under current standards and the phase-in standards.

  2. Campus Leader Support: The Officer promotes the use of protocols from Kilgo Consulting and Lead4ward. These protocols serve to structure data conversations with SCEI coaches and administrators. This scaffolded approach develops the abilities of instructional leaders in guiding their campus teams in data analysis resulting in data-driven decisions.

  3. Data Analysis: All actions are based on data. The officer examines the strengths and areas of need of each campus and trains SCEI coaches in looking at data from multiple viewpoints. In this process hard to teach standards are identified and training efforts developed. The officer leads teachers in the use of data tools to identify student performance on specific Student Expectations (SEs). Exploring alternate ways to teach and assess SEs follows. Through this process current instructional materials are reviewed to ensure alignment to the SEs and additional resources are shared for consideration. The officers identified high needs middle schools and provided intensive support geared to their specific needs. This required assessing the teachers’ current practices and resources and designing plans around their strengths.

  4. Program Oversight: The department oversees the development and implementation of state/federal mandated curriculum, programs, and assessment systems while providing information to campus staff, counselors, and parents in order to ensure the academic success of all students.

  5. Instructional Coaching: The officer collects observational data at our high schools and middle schools. The data, focused on District initiatives and campus and/or teacher needs, is shared in one-on-one conversations with teachers and coaches. This prompted reflection leads self-directed adjustments in their practices.

  6. Lesson Design: The officer guides teachers, coaches and Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) in designing TEKS-based lessons in which district initiatives and best practices are embedded. These practices include cooperative learning, hands-on learning, use of the power zone, frequent small group purposeful talk, and the integration of writing. At times the officer models the lesson for teachers. The debriefing discussions following the model teaching are an integral part of the process and deepened teachers’ thinking about their practices and their students’ understanding. Throughout the lesson planning process, formative assessment is emphasized. Determining the levels of student understanding and making appropriate instructional adjustments in the moment is a proven strategy (Hattie, 2008).

  7. Student Intervention: In addition to STAAR data, benchmark exam results are analyzed in session with district and campus teams. In these sessions, the officer presents a multitude of hands-on activities and formative assessment checks to increase student mastery of the hard to learn TEKS. With this targeted guidance, teacher teams develop plans to address student needs. In addition the officer creates units and resources for use during school tutorials. The officer leads the team in monitoring the implementation of these interventions and making modifications as needed. After the STAAR End of Course exams, he continues to work with students and teachers in a strategic manner, focusing efforts on the students and teachers most in need of support. The teachers and students engage fully in the process and their positive attitudes and growing confidence led to better teacher and student performance evident in the re-test results.

Needs

  1. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS): The new math TEKS for grades K-8 will be implemented and the math TEKS for grades 9-12 the following year. As a part of the new math TEKS the process standards which require critical thinking skills as math content knowledge is applied in various situations, have been aligned K-12. The Texas Education Agency has sent a clear message in terms of the importance of the process standards and their expectations for instruction. This certainly means a clear shift in the approach and delivery of instruction. High school math teachers will see the process standards for the first time as a major part of their curriculum. Teachers will have to learn how to address the new emphasis on the processing standards, and completely new for high school teachers as well as the shift of TEKS that have shifted grade levels at a time when we will be facing a more difficult phase in standard for all grade levels.

  2. STAAR: In the spring of 2015, the initial plan by the Texas Education Agency (TEA) was to assess students on only the TEKS that overlap from the current to the new, however the shift of the new math TEKS was so dramatic that there is minimal amount of overlapping material to create such an exam. This means that the new exam will be fully based on the new math TEKS which are significantly different. With the new math TEKS come new readiness standards, supporting standards, reporting categories, newly revised curriculum focal points as well as tested curriculum. One new component of the math TEKS in grades K-8 is the Financial Literacy Standards. It will be crucial to examine current data in the new light of the changing TEKS and the shifts in what will be assessed on STAAR.

  3. Instructional Materials: With the new math TEKS also came the adoption of new math resources. These new resources are aligned to the new Math TEKS and come with multiple components to include teacher and student online version, student consumable version, assessment and other activity masters. No resource is 100% aligned to the TEKS, so teachers must be fully aware of where they may need to supplement and/or adjust lessons.

  4. Trends: While improvement has been made in several areas and teachers, SCEIs, and administrators are overall more capable at interpreting data, there is more work to be done. For example:

Our scores have increased in Phase 1 Algebra I, and in Phase 2 as well as final phase. While adding 2 percentage points in Phase 1, added 3 percent in Phase 2 and 5 percent in Phase 3. This data demonstrates that the district is headed in the right direction but with new TEKS looming to include the new process skills at the high school level and phase two scores significantly behind phase 1 scores instructional strategies need to change to address the EOC. This upcoming year will be a pivotal year where our scores will be compared to a lower passing standard. We must ensure that teachers, parents, and students to understand the changes.

While we have addressed the data and made inroads into discussing changes in the classroom, greater changes in classroom instruction are required. In the table below, we can see the break down by high schools. The drop for Phase two is significant across all campuses except Eastlake HS where their scores appear to be unchanged. Significant progress must be made in classroom instruction to address this drop and campus support will be a vital component of this task.

  1. STAAR Changes: A comprehensive plan is required to communicate the Phase in process and the implications for students. This needs to be followed by data analysis to identify the hard to teach/hard to learn TEKS and from there design appropriate professional development that includes campus administrators. By furthering the instructional leadership abilities of the campus administrative teams, we will increase our impact on our instructional program. Hillary Clinton once said that "it takes a village to raise a child" and I think it takes a district to succeed at the math EOC exams and the first step in our 12 step program will be the meeting and admitting we have a problem.

  2. In the 2011-12 school year we began participating in the Gear Up grant. This grant is being used to support math instruction throughout the district. This support came first by providing calculators, training and tutors in the 7th grade classroom. Each successive year that support has moved up a grade level. In the 2015-16 school year the grant will be supporting 11th grade math students. The calculator we are using in our classrooms is popular with students as well as teachers. It is capable of being used wirelessly around the classroom to collect formative assessment and to make the student as the presenter. Several campuses have purchased the equipment to be used in their 6th grade classrooms. As teachers change positions, retire, move out of the district we are finding pockets of untrained teachers. Students may know how to use the equipment but teachers are lacking the professional development. We need to identify teachers that are new to a math assignment that have equipment and train throughout the year to make sure they are well supported and understand how to best use the equipment to impact instruction. We need to ensure that every math classroom, sixth grade and above, across the district has the equipment, calculators, software and navigator system to bolster mathematics learning.

  3. Mathematics instructors need the opportunity to learn and embrace best practices in their field. The Socorro district has a wealth of untapped knowledge in our teachers how to best address the content, pedagogy, use of specific resources, as well as behavioral issues in the classroom. Teachers need to be teamed together and be lead in a lesson study that can be shared with the larger mathematical community of our district through a mini-conference or professional development day where teachers can share what they have learned.

  4. While there is much to be learned in our district on math instruction it is critical that there be opportunities for professional development outside of our community. For our district to stay at the forefront of mathematics instruction we need to learn from others around the country. This can be accomplished by sending personnel from the district to both learn and present at state and national conferences. That learning could then infuse our classrooms with much needed ideas on cutting edge practices as well as gives us the ability to identify trainers to support district needs.

Summary

To promote system change it is critical to work with every aspect of the instructional team in Socorro ISD which includes district personnel, campus administrators, teachers, staff, and students. Communication is key to any effective organization to clarify the vision and ensure consistent application of best practices which build on the learning. Communications, whether written or verbal, maintain a professional and supportive tone that leads to honest dialog and better understanding for all participants. When working with teachers in need of assistance the officer ensures the campus leaders are aware of the steps we are taking to improve classroom instruction. In this process it is also critical for the principal to clearly articulate his or her vision and instructional focus so the teacher support is aligned. In all mathematics courses, the content is taught as a way of understanding mathematics and how it connects to other areas such as science, social studies, and language arts as well as to applications of mathematics utilized in the real world. Concepts are developed through concrete, pictorial, numerical and graphical representations to accommodate the varied learning styles of students and provide windows of opportunity for all students to become basic-skills-competent, technologically-literate problem solvers.

--Science

Strengths

Science scores have increased from year to year across all grade levels. This demonstrates that 5th grade teachers are making gains with their students. The district is holding even with the state average. The data reflects strengths in the classroom that are also reflected in student success at science fairs. The district hosts both a Middle and High School Science Fair that allows students to qualify for competition at the Regional, State, and International levels. SISD has historically had a strong showing at each of these levels and students that are successful at these accelerated levels of science fair are also high performers in other content areas.

A Science STAAR Review (STAAR Blitz) was held for 5th grade teachers in order to review low performing Student Expectation throughout the district. Teachers were provided with interactive lessons to implement with students to improve areas of need. The review session was followed with a positive response and demonstrated needs that teachers would like addressed throughout the next school year.

STEMscopes has been utilized to provide hands-on inquiry activities, plus intervention and acceleration materials, as well as teacher support resources. Intersession camps provided students with additional support and the means to engage in meaningful learning opportunities. Limited class sizes allowed for enhanced learning with a more individualized approach.

Needs

There is a need to provide scientifically research-based supplemental resources such as STEMscopes and equipment and materials for instruction, which will support student learning through hands-on activities. It is also important to facilitate student camps such as Intersession Science camps and Robotics Camps to increase student exposure to curriculum. To ensure success, the District should implement Super Scientist Academies to provide teacher training in an array of mediums, such as interactive workshops, classroom modeling, lesson planning, and assessment samples. Another veritable need is for students to have an opportunity to participate in Campus, District, Regional, State and International Science Fairs to strengthen the scientific process. With the adoption of new textbooks for Science, there is a need for a Trainer of Trainers to provide support and information for teachers. It is important to consider, also, that the National Science Teacher Association Conference would provide new ideas for best practices in science. Conference attendance would allow Instructional Officers to provide turn-around trainings to SCEI Coaches and teachers.

--Social Studies

Strengths

The elementary Social Studies curriculum is slowly, yet surely, becoming more prevalent. The district has started an alignment with the Socorro High School feeder pattern spanning from kindergarten through 12th grade. Another alignment has begun with 3 PreK-8 schools, aligning from Kindergarten to 8th grade. These alignment cohorts provide professional development focusing on Social Studies process skills which will hopefully boost 8th grade test scores, as well as reading scores as these process skills are completely aligned to Figure 19. The district has also provided professional development on how to integrate Social Studies into the ELAR block. These sessions include strategies, hands on activities, and make-and-takes. In addition, the district will be providing Texas History and U.S. History cadres in order to help teachers unpack their Social Studies TEKS and better understand the content needing to be delivered. Lastly, the district has implemented PBL’s such as “Digging into Archaeology,” a two day archaeology camp for fourth grade students.

A number of middle schools have agreed to develop common pacing guides as well as common assessments to formatively assess how students are doing in different facets of Social Studies. The formative assessments will be used to design intervention practices during class time and after school as well as influence professional development plans for content and strategy-based efforts.

Needs

Although the elementary Social Studies curriculum is seeing improvement, there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. Campuses are in need of up-to-date resources/materials, to include books, station activities, and manipulatives. In addition, the aid of Social Studies unit plans and common assessment from Kinder through 5th grade will help guide teachers and principals in the content that needs to be taught according to the TEKS. Finally, expanding the alignment efforts throughout the district will help improve U.S. History scores in 8th grade and bring to light the importance of teaching Social Studies content, especially in regards to preparing students to meet the demands of college (District Direction #2).

Secondary schools have begun to influence district initiatives in Social Studies through their effective use of common assessments in its beginning stages and the growth of horizontal alignment initiatives throughout the year. However, there is still a need to increase the use of data analysis to affect intervention decision-making and strategies throughout the majority of campuses at the secondary level.

Research and Evaluation

Intent and Purpose

The office of Research and Evaluation oversees the administration of state mandated assessments such as STAAR 3-8, STAAR EOC, TAKS, TELPAS, and district initiated assessments such as benchmark exams and mock tests. The Research and Evaluation Department plays a key role in the College Readiness Initiative and oversees the ACCUPLACER assessment administrations. The Research and Evaluation department also provides data to the district and community stakeholders. In addition, all research conducted within the district must be approved by the Research and Evaluation Office.

Strengths

School Objects Eduphoria Aware allows the District to maintain item banks, create tests, conduct student assessments, analyze data, and build student forms. Eduphoria collaborates with Lead4Ward which gives the District the option to disaggregate data differently. Campuses can track student progress on any local or state assessment. Eduphoria Aware allows campuses and district leadership to collect, oversee and explore student, teacher and campus performance effectively and efficiently. Eduphoria tracks district, student, and teacher progress. STAAR TestMaker allows educators to quickly and easily create a nearly infinite amount of reliable and rigorous STAAR-aligned tests by combining user-friendly software with an item bank of over 60,000 items.

Needs

The District will need an additional server to help with the storage of district teacher and student data in Eduphoria aware. Also needed is the funding to cover the costs of the STAAR TestMaker, the printing of District Fall/Spring benchmarks, the District Writing Initiative, reports from Pearson, credit by exam, as well as the testing and data for the SAT and PSAT.

Special Education

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Special Education Department is to provide supports to students with disabilities to maximize the potential of each and every student in the least restrictive environment appropriate. Each student’s IEPs, accommodations, and modifications are calculated for success. The ultimate goal of the program for students is to excel academically, socially, and behaviorally. Success will mean different things for different students. For some it will mean post-secondary education, and for others it will be learning a vocation. For some students, it will be maintaining their quality of life. Within this department, we also supervise the dyslexia program, which is mandated by the state. Students who display characteristics of dyslexia and become eligible for the program must have a reading intervention program that is systematic, explicit, cumulative, teacher-directed, and multi-sensory.

Strengths

The Special Education Program offers a variety of supports for students with disabilities. The creation of each student’s IEP is based on assessment, both formal and informal. The present levels of academic and functional performance indicate where the student is currently and is used as a baseline for the IEP. Modifications/accommodations are also documented to help support students in a variety of placements. The continuum of services available at the home campus includes co-teaching, support facilitation, and specialized support. Those services only located at certain campuses include ACCESS, Practical Academic Skills (PAS) Class, Behavior Improvement Class (BIC), Functional Living Skills (FLS) Class, Structured Learning Unit (SLU), and the Individualized Learning Center (ILC). Many of those who work within the field of special education are veterans, finding great job satisfaction in their job from year to year. One of the highlights of the year are the special events organized to showcase the skills of our students with special needs to include the James Butler Spring Games, and James Butler Celebration Day. The Special Education department also raises money for the James Butler Scholarship fund to support, a student who has received special education services, at the post-secondary level. With regards to dyslexia, the district has been using programs that meet the state’s criteria for the purpose of interventions for students identified with dyslexia.

Needs

In order for students with special needs to be successful in the least restrictive environment, instruction needs to be accommodated, modified, and differentiated. In conducting classroom observations throughout the district, it was observed that students were trying to complete the same exact assignment the general education students were completing. There is a need for professional development in this area. There is also a need to provide intervention materials to supplement the core curriculum for reading, math, and writing, along with paraprofessional staff to support students who are more involved and require a lower adult/student ratio. With regards to homebound services (general ed, special ed, and pregnancy related services), online connectivity allows students to access resources that their peers who are well enough to attend school, can access so that they can complete assignments and continue to make progress. Lastly, many times it is difficult for our special ed. teachers to know how to create lessons that touch upon the TEKS for our most involved students. Programs that provide teachers resources to support this endeavor are a definite need.

It is necessary for the Special Education Department to develop contracts with entities outside of the school district for medical reasons and in the event a parent disagrees with our assessments (they are entitled to an independent educational evaluation). When assessing students, we are required to use only the most current versions of standardized evaluations to determine eligibility for the special education program—we need to update many evaluations utilized by diagnosticians and speech therapists. In identifying students for the special education program, we often encounter the homeless and migrant population in need of evaluation. Many times they move before we can evaluate them so special care should be taken to identify the need for testing quickly.

We are developing a new class called Practical Academics Skills (PAS) class due to the fact that we see a need for students to be better prepared for a vocation after leaving high school. The class will focus upon the development of academic abilities within the context of vocational training. Teachers will need to attend staff development to learn how to implement this new program while still honoring student IEPs. There continues to be a need in focusing on the continuum of services instructional model to include co-teaching, support facilitation, specialized support, and external support. Administrative costs are also a necessary part of the implementation of the special ed. program in SISD, to include those incurred for parental involvement.

Parents are an important partner in the education of our students and we continue to provide opportunities for parents to enhance their knowledge and skills through workshops and trainings. They also actively support our special athletic events which showcase our students' abilities; events we will continue to plan and expand as we are partnered with Special Olympics Texas.

The dyslexia program has struggled to produce consistent results at the elementary level due to the fact that teachers are having difficulty implementing the program with fidelity. The requirements of the program are time intensive and difficult to master for a classroom teacher who has been assigned various duties. There is also inconsistency in the provision of services across the district at the elementary school level. Lastly, because campuses have found it difficult to implement the program, fewer students are being referred for assessments for dyslexia. As a result, we are under identifying students who may require this service.

State and Federal Programs

Intent and Purpose

The Department of State and Federal Programs exists for the purpose of meeting the requirements of State Compensatory Education and Title I, Part A, Improving Basic Programs, Part C, Migrant Education, and Part D, Delinquent Youth, as per No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.

--Title I, Part A - Improving Basic Programs

Intent and Purpose

Improving Basic Programs provides supplemental funding to state and school districts for resources to help schools with high concentrations of students from low-income families in order to provide a high-quality education that will enable all children to meet the state’s student performance standards. Title I, Part A supports schools in implementing either a school-wide program or a targeted assistance program. These programs must use effective methods and instructional strategies that are grounded in scientifically-based research.

Strengths

All 48 schools in SISD are Title I school wide. The school-wide program is designed to upgrade the entire educational program in each of the campuses. Its primary goal is to ensure that all students, particularly those who are low-achieving, demonstrate proficient and advanced levels of achievement on the state’s student assessment. Title I funds allocated to the campuses is equal to 70% of the District’s planning amount and is based on the number of economically disadvantaged students both at the district and campus level. The District reserves a maximum of 30% for supplemental programs and/or initiatives district wide.

The school-wide program at each campus includes the following components:

  1. Comprehensive Needs Assessment
  2. Reform Strategies
  3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers
  4. High-Quality Professional Development
  5. Strategies to Attract HQ Teachers
  6. Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement (NOTE: There is a full time parent liaison at every one of our schools.)
  7. Transition for Pre-K / K students
  8. Teacher Decision-Making Regarding Assessments
  9. Effective and Timely Assistance to Students
  10. Coordination and Integration of Federal, State, and Local Services and Programs

SISD has a district level planning and decision-making committee, the Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC), which works in conjunction with the Superintendent to annually develop, revise, and implement the District Improvement Plan. EPAC is an extension of the campus’ School Improvement Team (SIT) whose duties are to (1) conduct a comprehensive needs assessment; (2) commit to specific district goals and strategies that address those needs; (3) create a comprehensive plan; and (4) conduct a mid-year review and end-of-year review of the effectiveness of the District and school wide program and revise the plans as necessary.

Needs

The Department of State and Federal Programs needs to continue reserving the 30% allowable by the federal government under Title I, Part A. The planned reservations cover, among several programs, the District’s parental involvement program. The District consistently and continuously provides program information for parents as there is a parent liaison and/or Communities in School coordinator that assists in building capacity for parental involvement. These staff members provide assistance to parents in understanding such topics as the state’s academic content and achievement standards, the assessments being used, the requirements of Title I, Part A, and how to monitor their children’s progress and work with educators to improve their achievement. The District and the campuses provide materials and training, such as literacy training and trainings on how to use technology, to help parents work with their children to improve achievement. The District also educates the teachers, pupil services personnel, principals and other staff, with the assistance of parents as equal partners, to implement and coordinate parent programs and build ties between parents and the school. When necessary, parent liaisons assist in providing parents with information regarding the transition from Pre-Kindergarten to kindergarten of their 4 or 5-year old children. Parent liaisons also ensure that all communication to parents is sent in a format and, and to the extent practicable, in a language the parents can understand.

The District needs to continue funding the Department of State and Federal Programs’ staff, for the administration of Title I, Part A (including administration of Title I, Part A programs for eligible private school students, students at facilities for delinquent, homeless students, and parental involvement program). Staff members need to continue attending conferences, trainings, and workshops to get information/updates regarding compliance issues that govern the programs we oversee. Additionally, it is imperative that prior to the new school year, the various departments conduct a thorough needs assessment of all supplemental programs being implemented district wide. There is a need to review end-of-year usage reports for the online programs such as iStation and Read 180. Does student usage merit the expenditures? We need to continue funding LUCHA and Spantran for assistance in interpreting transcripts for our immigrant students. Furthermore, because providing all students with a safe learning environment is an SISD priority, it is essential that we continue funding the Olweus Bullying Prevention program. And due to the fact that we need highly qualified administrators in order to ensure high student performance, the Superintendent’s AP Academy needs to continue for the coming year. We need to ensure Title I funds are expended on a timely fashion, thus ensuring that the programs and/or services for all students are provided during the school year, and not when students have left for their summer break.

There is a need for the department to provide support to students of Mission Ridge Elementary school in the areas of Reading and Writing. The services of LITCONN will be utilized to this end specifically for Kinder through 2nd grade students. LITCONN will provide guidance on using assessments to place students in reading and writing instructional levels, identify critical needs of intervention, and monitor reading and writing progress.

--Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC)

Intent and Purpose

SISD Policy BQA Legal and Local state that the a district-level decision-making committee (consisting of 1 representative from each campus, district-level employees, and business and community members) will convene at least six times a year to cover the areas of planning, budgeting, curriculum, staffing patterns, staff development, and school organization. Also, in compliance with Education Code 11.251, the Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) shall also advise the Board and/or Superintendent in establishing and reviewing the District’s educational goals, objectives, and major districtwide classroom instructional programs. The committee shall serve exclusively in an advisory role except that the committee shall approve staff development of a districtwide nature.

Strengths

EPAC participation has increased over the last few years and efforts to remain in compliance with SISD policies BQA Legal and Local have improved amongst district departments and campus teams. SISD's Superintendent has utilized EPAC meetings to stay in contact with a wider array of constituents, ensuring a positive rapport with both employees of the district as well as with business and community members. Increased collaboration between campus teams and the district committee has occurred in areas such as professional development. EPAC members, relaying the needs of their campus teachers, have been more vocal about what they need in order to bolster the academic achievement of students. Because of EPAC meetings, networking between campuses has also increased due to the fact that common issues have been expressed and addressed.

Needs

There is a veritable need to continue funding the meetings of the district-level committee not only because they are mandated by policy, but because they have proven beneficial to the inner workings of the district itself. The meetings help to demonstrate that district decisions are not made in an arbitrary fashion, but that they are calculated and communal. Communication between district administrators, campus teams, and business and community members is of the utmost importance, and EPAC meetings provide a "sounding board" of sorts by which district stakeholders can make their thoughts and concerns known.

--State Compensatory Education

Intent and Purpose

State Compensatory Education (SCE) is defined in law as programs and/or services designed to supplement the regular education program for students identified as at-risk of dropping out of school (TEC 29.081). Its purpose is to increase the academic achievement and reduce the drop-out rate of these identified students, while its goal is to provide direct instruction to close the achievement gap between children at risk of dropping out of school and their peers. To meet this goal, the Socorro Independent School District uses student performance data to design and implement appropriate compensatory, intensive, or accelerated instructional services that enable them to be performing at grade level at the conclusion of the school year.

Strengths

To ensure at-risk students are receiving a meaningful and effective program, SISD funds numerous supplemental programs and personnel in an effort to provide accelerated instructional services for students at risk of dropping out of school. Positions such as an SCE instructional specialist, SCE Intervention coaches, Communities in Schools (CIS) coordinators, reading/ESL and lab teachers, Compensatory Education Homebound Instruction Teacher, class-size reductions teachers, instructional aides, library aides, and master social workers, are all supplemental and funded through SCE funds. SCE funded personnel participate in professional development that are both related and beneficial to the state compensatory education program and the students served. Professional development is not only key but essential for the delivery of instructional services for at-risk students. In addition to funding positions, programs, and/or activities that are supplemental to the basic instructional program funded through SCE dollars, the department examines data to improve academic performance through direct instructional services. Due to increased accountability, systems are in place to document the various SCE supplemental programs and or services that are undertaken by the district. The department maintains documents such as improvement plans, signed job descriptions, purchase orders, FTE lists, personnel action forms, time sheets, weekly logs, time and effort logs, lesson plans, and at risk student rosters to justify the use of SCE funding. Auditable documents include sign-in sheets, agendas, and evaluations.

SISD prides itself in the way that students who are at risk of dropping out of school are identified and offered support on a timely fashion. Good teaching includes proven, research-based methods by which teachers respond to students who are experiencing difficulty, academically or otherwise. These methods, referred to as interventions, are not only vital to supporting at-risk students, but are also to be documented as per state guidelines. Using an internally developed database known as the At-Risk Management System (ARMS), SISD has made it possible for teachers to document the different methods by which they support their at-risk students. Additionally, ARMS gives teachers the ability to see what previous teachers have already tried in support of these same students. Responding to the needs of struggling students is already something that teachers do, and ARMS simply gives them a way to see what their colleagues have already tried and to document what they have tried themselves. The strength of the system, like all other systems, is entirely dependent upon users utilizing it with diligence. To further ensure students are being provided with interventions, campus administrators, identified as campus At-Risk Coordinators, also receive training by State and Federal Programs staff, in the identification of at-risk students, using the Financial Accountability System Resource Guide (FASRG) at-risk indicators: this done in an effort to provide the students with a compensatory education program that will address the identified student needs.

Supplemental SCE teachers at various campuses, impact student performance as these individuals provide additional interventions. Teachers can address the needs of struggling students who have deficits in their understanding of the core content material. Programs that help teachers address these deficits include: Read 180, Math labs, and Science labs.

Additionally, at least one full-time Library Media Center Aide position, who also serves as an at-risk instructional aide for fifty (50) percent of the day, provides instructional assistance to students throughout the school day. Through the collaboration between classroom teachers and the librarian, at-risk students are identified and modified instruction is delivered by the library media center aide to ensure student achievement through the library program.

For further support, SISD has implemented the use of State Compensatory Education Intervention (SCE-I) Coaches to serve at-risk students with direct intervention and to provide support to teachers in the form of lesson modeling, training, and intervention delivery. Additionally, Class Size Reduction (CSR) teachers are in place at elementary campuses to alleviate class loads in 5th grade and to implement a more favorable student-teacher ratio. At secondary campuses, CSR teachers are used to provide additional support to students in the content area(s) that each campus has defined as priority. Data is used to deliver proper direct instruction to at-risk students most in need. Approximately 25 campuses have an assigned at-risk instructional aide who works with small groups and who can assist struggling students on a one-to-one basis. Evidence to support the feasibility of this includes standardized test scores and classroom assessments. Some campuses utilize Communities in Schools (CIS) coordinators who assist struggling students via community services. Evidence of the positive impact of CIS workers includes standardized test scores and classroom assessments.

---Communities In Schools (CIS)

Communities in Schools is a program that provides support services to at-risk students and their families in order prevent student dropout and to help students follow positive paths towards successful futures. SISD implements the use of CIS coordinators at several campuses to help at-risk students overcome obstacles that they sometimes encounter, not only in school, but in other areas of life. On the Communities in Schools of El Paso website, the program states: We implement the following six components to all of our direct caseload students:

  1. Educational Enhancement
  2. Supportive Guidance
  3. Enrichment
  4. Health and Human Services
  5. Parental Involvement
  6. Career Awareness/Employment

Additionally, CIS coordinators and four master social workers assist students who have a high absentee rate as well as those students who have a history of delinquent conduct and social service needs. CIS and the social workers focus their services on at-risk students at their respective campuses. Both CIS and the social workers provide extensive follow-up services, additional tutoring and supportive guidance service; coordinate with health and human services to provide supportive guidance for students and parents in order to improve student attendance and to increase parental involvement; and provide drop out recovery. The services that Socorro ISD campuses offer to at-risk students have been greatly enhanced by those offered by CIS coordinators. The cooperative efforts of SISD and CIS to support these students illustrate how school-community partnerships are so crucial.

At the District level, there is a State Compensatory Education Specialist who provides staff development training to individuals whose responsibilities pertain to providing appropriate services to at-risk students including, but not limited to: At-Risk Instructional Aides, Library Instructional Aides, Supplemental SCE Teachers, Assistant Principals/campus At Risk Coordinator, SCE Intervention Coaches, CSR teachers, and PEIMS Clerks. Trainings will cover topics such as: TEA Module 9 Regulations and Guidelines, at-risk student eligibility/exit criteria, personnel job descriptions/responsibilities, and the campus improvement plan, specifically, the goal, objectives, and strategies addressing student academic achievement.

---Pregnancy Related Services (PRS)

Pregnancy Related Services are support services, including Compensatory Education Home Instruction (CEHI) that a student receives during the pregnancy prenatal and postpartum periods to help her adjust academically, mentally, and physically and stay in school. These services are delivered to a student when:

Since the SISD offers a PRS program, the District also offers CEHI services, funded through State Compensatory Education, as part of the program. The District receives 2.41 PRS weighted funding while Pregnancy Related Services are being provided to the student.

---Options High School

The District also has an alternative high school or school of choice - Options High School with capacity to serve 150-200 At-Risk and recovered dropout students. Admission to Options High School is based on recommendations from counselors at the main district high schools and on interviews with students and their families. Options High School offers academic options for students who want to complete the necessary requirements for obtaining a high school diploma. OHS is a competency-based learning system with flexible scheduling for young adults who are not successfully completing a traditional high school program. The student's commitment and desire to earn a high school diploma, combined with a caring, positive learning climate, determines the student's degree of success.

---Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP)/KEYS Academy

The Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) provides a positive, highly structured and disciplined educational setting for at risk students. The DAEP/KEYS Academy serves high school and middle school students in one facility. In another facility where elementary students are served, they are self-contained. Students are placed in an academic program that replicates their home campus schedule as closely as possible. Success in the program is enhanced with small classes, parental involvement, tutoring, individual counseling, group counseling, substance abuse counseling, mentor program through community involvement, and school survival skills classes consisting of improving self-concept, behavior, personal motivation, individualistic responsibilities, study skills and awareness of career choices.

---Summer/Intersession Intervention Programs

Summer/intersession intervention programs exist as yet another service for at-risk students. Each campus receives a state compensatory education allotment to serve the needs of their at-risk student population. Campuses utilize these funds to purchase supplemental materials and resources and provide intersession/tutoring sessions to help raise the academic achievement levels of their at-risk population. These programs provide supplemental instructional support for students identified as at-risk based on low performance in core areas. Tutoring may focus on either academic standards or state assessment preparation. Tutors work with students in small groups for limited periods of time to increase specific skills. A crucial component in successful tutoring programs is effective communication between classroom teachers and tutors. Tutors coordinate instruction with the classroom teacher to assure that tutoring strategies are supporting classroom instruction and that the student is benefiting from tutoring. To ensure that students are being offered proper services, the State Compensatory Education Instructional Specialist assists faculty and staff in improving and enhancing the regular education program for students in at-risk situations. The SCE Instructional Specialist ensures compensatory education increases the academic achievement of identified students in at-risk situations and reduces the dropout rate. Strategies are developed and resources are designated to meet identified areas of need of the students at-risk. Compensatory education funds are used to provide support for students at risk of dropping out of school or for students who are not performing satisfactorily in an academic setting. The SCE Instructional Specialist works with program teachers, campus administrators, and other appropriate staff in meeting instructional goals, objectives and methods. In addition, efforts to coordinate appropriate programs PK-12 are maintained so that students have the opportunity to reach optimum performance.

Needs

There is a great need to make sure that all teachers are provided with consistent and continuous professional development to assist them in the delivery of direct and accelerated instruction for all at risk students. There is also a need to train new administrators who have been appointed as the campus At Risk Coordinator and new teachers, on the use of the At-Risk Management System; as well as retrain current administrators and teachers who need the support or a refresher course on TEC 29.081 guidelines.

Furthermore, we need to ensure the documenting of student interventions (provided by teachers to at-risk students) into the District's online database known as the At-Risk Management System (ARMS) once every three (3) weeks. These interventions have been identified by State and Federal Programs staff members working with district specialists in Reading and other content areas, and well as specialists working with special populations. Each campus has an At-Risk Coordinator who is an Assistant Principal that has been assigned to oversee services offered to at-risk students and to ensure proper documentation of these services. The At-Risk Coordinator serves as the primary liaison between the Department of State and Federal Programs and the campus, shares information and data from ARMS at faculty meetings, and monitors interventions and documentation in ARMS. There is a marked need to make sure that At-Risk Coordinators are regularly looking at the intervention data entered by the teachers at their respective campuses and that problems in the entering of these data are addressed. If teachers do not document in ARMS as they should, then the evidence of support for each of their at-risk students is minimized. Future teachers of these students will have no reference as to what interventions have already been tried, causing redundancy in curriculum.

There is a need as well, for the newly identified State Compensatory Education Intervention Coaches (SCE-I Coaches) at campuses to receive professional development for the instruction of at-risk students. These coaches will be able to share the professional development/training with campus administrators and teachers on best practices for the instruction of at-risk students. There is also a need for At-Risk Coordinators and coaches to monitor student interventions through the At-Risk Management System. With regards to these interventions, special programs (i.e. intervention labs in math, reading and science) need to be offered in order to help students meet the at-risk exit criteria during regular instructional time. Programs may be funded in coordination with local and federal sources to meet the needs of students in at-risk situations. Continued services by the At-Risk Instructional Aides and Library Aides are necessary in order to offer students a variety of services that include, but are not restricted to, collaborating with the At-Risk Coordinator to ensure that at-risk students receive targeted instruction to improve student performance, working closely with SCE Intervention Coaches to address the needs of at-risk students, and working with individual at-risk students or small groups of at-risk students to reinforce learning of material or skills initially introduced by the teacher. The At-Risk Instructional Aide is responsible for working with direct instruction of students for eighty-five (85) percent of their time, whereas library aides are accountable for working fifty (50) percent of their time with direct instruction of students.

The State Compensatory Education Instructional Specialist position is still necessary for the 2015-2016 school year to evaluate and provide documentation to the State and Federal Programs Director regarding progress by maintaining accurate, complete, and correct records as required by law, district policy and administrative regulation. The Specialist will work with program teachers, campus administrators, and other appropriate staff in meeting instructional goals, objectives and methods. Homebound teachers are also still needed so that the expected outcome of a student’s education will not be interrupted. Grades and completed work will be evaluated upon return to school after postpartum period. An emphasis is placed on all homebound work being completed prior to the student’s return to school.

Additionally, the State Compensatory Education Intervention Coaches at campuses should remain at the campuses and should continue to receive professional development for the instruction of at-risk students. These coaches will be able to share the professional development/training with campus administrators and teachers on best practices for the instruction of at-risk students. There is also a need for the Assistant Principals/At-Risk Coordinators and coaches to monitor student interventions through the At-Risk Management System. With regards to these interventions, special programs (i.e. intervention labs in math, reading and science) need to be offered in order to help students meet the at-risk exit criteria during regular instructional time. Programs may be funded in coordination with local and federal sources to meet the needs of students in at-risk situations. Continued services by the At-Risk Instructional Aides and Library Aides are necessary in order to offer students a variety of services that include, but are not restricted to, collaborating with the at-risk coordinator to ensure that at-risk students receive targeted instruction to improve student performance, working closely with SCE Intervention coaches to address the needs of at-risk students, and working with individual at-risk students or small groups of at-risk students to reinforce learning of material or skills initially introduced by the teacher. The At-Risk Instructional aide is responsible for working with direct instruction of students for eighty-five (85) percent of their time and effort, whereas library aides are accountable for working fifty (50) percent of their time with direct instruction of students.

SISD Legal Policy EHBC (Special Programs - Compensatory/Accelerated Services) specifically states that "if the number of students enrolled in a school who are at risk of dropping out of school is equal to at least ten percent of the number of students in average daily attendance at the school," then the school must take part in the Communities in Schools (CIS) program. There is a need for the District to fund a CIS worker at each of our schools, as all of them meet the 10% criteria. SISD must take feasible measures to ensure that CIS personnel are in place to offer services to help all at risk students succeed.

There is a need to continue with Pregnancy Related Services for our pregnant students: thus, a need for Compensatory Education Home Instruction (CEHI). CEHI must consist of face-to-face instruction by a certified teacher of the District. Substitute teachers can be used to provide CEHI; however, the individual selected as a substitute must be a certified teacher. It is necessary that the CEHI maintain a log to document the actual amount of prenatal and postpartum CEHI each student receives.

The SISD Options High School Educational Program is still necessary in order to provide high school students with a non-traditional educational program so that students can complete credits for graduation and/or meet standards on state exit level assessment. Options High School students are expected to complete a minimum of three credits per 18 week period in order to meet the SISD graduation requirements. TEKS for each course must be mastered at 80% or better. District students whose disruptive and/or unacceptable behavior warrants removal from their home campus will still require the presence of the district DAEP program, Keys Academy. Once the appropriateness of the assignment is determined in a hearing involving an administrator from the student’s home campus, student’s parent/guardian, and the student, then the student is assigned for the appropriate number of days.

The District evaluates and documents the effectiveness of the SCE program and determines which funded strategies are successful at raising academic standards. If the programs and/or services that are provided to reduce any disparity in academic performance are unsuccessful, the SCE resources are redirected.

--Foster Care Education Program

Intent and Purpose

The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008, Public Law 110-351, addresses the critical need for school stability and continuity for the highly mobile population of children in foster care. The intent of the law requires state welfare agencies, court systems, state and local education agencies work together to support initiatives to improve educational outcomes for children in foster care. The purpose is for local education agencies to make data-informed decisions and provide academic interventions for students in care in order to help close the achievement gap for this population. Each school district is statutorily required to appoint at least one employee to act as a liaison to facilitate the enrollment and transfer of records of students in the legal custody of the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) when enrolling in or changing schools.

Strengths

In February 2013, SISD was formally invited to attend the first Foster Care and Education Summit. The Children’s Commission, in partnership with the Texas Center for the Judiciary, Texas Education Agency, DFPS, and other stakeholders were included in this summit. There were only three districts from the Region 19 Education Service Center area included in this state-wide conference and since the conference, the El Paso participants meet monthly and work together through a coalition in order to maintain open communication and network so that the best academic decisions can be made for students in foster care. The El Paso Foster Care Education Coalition meets on a regular basis with the shared responsibility for hosting and conducting meetings among the school districts, Child Protective Services, and the El Paso Judiciary. The coalition determines which area stakeholders need training about the complex issues surrounding foster care and maintains a timeline of the training dates. Meetings are held on a monthly basis and contain diverse topics of discussion as child welfare and education members learn to navigate through the individual organizations’ complex systems. The district currently has some policies and procedures for enrollment of students in care. The Tyler Student Information System (SIS) allows for coding of students so that data is available on students enrolled in the district who are living with foster parents. Some awareness training has been conducted for district registrars, counselors, and administrators to avoid enrollment barriers.

Needs

An increase in efforts to build capacity and infrastructure within the district to support students in foster care is a need. There are twelve key activities for the district foster care liaison to accomplish in order to provide the best level of expertise and support for students and staff. The district needs to identify students in foster care for various reasons; including, but not limited to: verification from the foster care giver of proof of legal authority, implementation of supportive educational provisions regarding students in care, identification of students who are eligible for supplemental instructional services, aid in successful transitions for students, facilitation of high school completion and overall student success in school, assistance with planning and transitioning into post-secondary education. The law allows for students enrolled in a public school to remain in the school they were enrolled in at the time of placement, even if they are moved outside the attendance zones of the school or district. Although the care giver for a student in foster care is ultimately responsible for transportation arrangements to the school, there is a need for the district to exam the feasibility of coordinating transportation across neighboring school and district attendance areas in order to promote student success and maintain school stability. There is a need for the district to support trauma-informed care for teachers, resource officers, and other school staff to ensure that positive behavioral supports and interventions occur.

--Homeless Education Program

Intent and Purpose

The McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Program is designed to address the problems that homeless children and youth face when enrolling, attending, and succeeding in school. The intent is for children and youth experiencing homelessness to have access to all educational opportunities and services they need to enable them to meet the same challenging academic achievement standards as all other students. The purpose of the program is to require school districts to review and take the necessary steps to revise regulations, practices, or policies that may act as a barrier to the enrollment, attendance, or success in school of homeless children and youth. Every school district is required to designate a local liaison to serve as one of the primary contacts between homeless families, school staff, district personnel, shelter workers, and other service providers. The liaison coordinates services to ensure that homeless children and youth enroll and have the opportunity to succeed in school.

Strengths

The Socorro Independent School District continues to meet compliance requirements of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act of 2001 through its H.A.N.D.S. (Helping the Academic Needs of Displaced Students) Program by ensuring that students experiencing homelessness are enrolled immediately, guaranteed the right to remain at their school of origin and provided all necessary academic support. One way to ensure that this occurs is to provide training for district personnel on issues surrounding homelessness and provisions in the law. Counselors, CIS Coordinators, Social Workers, nurses, at-risk coordinators, PEIMS clerks, and registrars receive updates on an annual basis on compliance related issues. Parent Liaisons attend annual overviews of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act and are asked to share information with the parents at their respective campuses about the rights of homeless children and youth. Contacts by all personnel who receive this training are made with the Homeless Liaison whenever district-level or community support is needed by students and/or their families. The Texas Support for Homeless Education Program (TEXSHEP) grant, a McKinney-Vento sub grant, allows for the hiring of Temporary Instructional Aides (TIAs). These individuals provide intervention for 70 students enrolled in the H.A.N.D.S. Program. The assignment of campus support is a result of data on campuses in the district that did not meet performance standards. State assessment and district assessment information, report card grades, progress reports, failure reports and attendance information is disaggregated on a regular basis so that students in the H.A.N.D.S Program receive timely intervention instruction. In order to ensure that the homeless student population receives appropriate intervention, the TIAs attend monthly meetings for disaggregation of data, proper use of materials, and small group instructional strategies so that gaps in academic performance are addressed. A portion of the TEXSHEP funds support parental involvement opportunities at various campuses. Parent liaisons at the high schools and middle schools use materials and a guide in order to provide sessions on self-esteem, communication, and discipline.

Needs

Since many times there are students experiencing homelessness who need uniforms or clothing in order to attend and fully participate in school activities on a daily basis, these items are provided on an as needed basis. However, delays do exist causing instances where this specific support is not provided in a timely manner. There needs to be a continuation of efforts to meet the protocol established by the vendor for purchases. There also needs to be an increase in the communication with campuses to ensure that timely assessment of the needs of homeless students and submission of requests are made more quickly, especially for anything that requires processing of purchase orders. In order to ensure that adequate instructional support by the temporary instructional aides is available to all students in the district’s homeless program, campuses that deny support or restrict the scheduling of support need to meet with the homeless liaison to justify their decision so that documentation is maintained. With a decrease in the funding from the TEXSHEP grant, the number of Temporary Instructional Aides will drop from five to four. This will impact the number of students that receive academic intervention. In order to maintain the same level of instructional support for the homeless students, a fifth TIA is needed. For students to have the most up-to-date technology support, access to new electronic tools for instructional purposes is needed. The instructional aides need iPads or similar devices to help with instruction and access to web-based activities. This would require additional training to ensure that the devices are utilized appropriately. Additional consumable materials will need to be purchased so that the TIAs have similar resources as those used in classrooms. Feedback from the district’s parent liaisons about the parenting curriculum and the sessions involving the parents experiencing homelessness is very positive; however, the attendance rate of the parents in this population is low. There needs to be more effort made to increase participation from this group of parents. A shift in the times and days, to include evenings and weekends, when parenting sessions are offered is needed in order to accommodate the schedules of the homeless parents. With funds from the TEXSHEP grant, additional parental involvement materials for elementary campuses will need to be purchased in order to provide the same training as what is offered at the high schools and middle schools. The district’s homeless liaison needs to attend the annual state conference on ending homelessness as a provision of the TEXSHEP grant and to remain current on best practices to meet the academic, social, and psychological needs of children and youth in homeless situations. The liaison also needs to maintain the ability to connect families, children and youth with community resources and services through annual membership renewal and regular attendance at the El Paso Coalition for the Homeless meetings.

In order to provide additional support, there is a need for the department to implement the 2015-16 No Excuses College and Career Readiness Camp for middle school students. Students in 6th, 7th, and 8th grade from across the Socorro District will be offered an opportunity to begin planning for their futures before entering high school. The purpose is to identify students in the HANDS Program that exhibit the potential to become students for the AVID Program, at their home campus, and guide them through recognition of their interests; choosing careers that align with interests; and, searching for vocational, two-year, or four-year higher education prospects. The students selected will participate in a week-long camp filled with various activities to help develop their study-skills, increase their understanding of the relevance of working hard, and to make connections with what SISD offers to help enhance their interests before graduation. A culminating activity includes a field trip to the University of Texas at El Paso for a tour of the campus.

--Migrant Education Program

Intent and Purpose

The purpose of the Migrant Education Program is to design and support programs that help migrant students overcome the challenges of mobility, cultural and language barriers, social isolation, and other difficulties associated with a migratory lifestyle in order to succeed in school and to successfully transition to postsecondary education or employment.

Strengths

The Migrant Education Program (MEP) identifies and serves all qualifying migrant families and students. The qualifying students are eligible to receive additional academic support and additional services provided by the MEP. Students who are identified as needing eye or dental care are provided with financial assistance and those who are struggling academically are identified and academic support is provided through a Temporary Instructional Aide (one-to-one instruction). The migrant recruiter provides educational support for the three and four year old migrant students who are not enrolled in a head start program, and the parent and child receive instruction using A Bright Beginning curriculum. The M.E.P. provides additional resources such as laptops or other technical equipment for many of the students who are struggling academically. The students are able to use the equipment at home, so long as they are not abusing the use of the equipment and as long as it is being used for educational purposes. This allows the student to work at his/her own pace and allows the parents to work alongside their child. The Migrant Education Program also provides enrichment opportunities. The students are invited to attend different summer programs which are organized by the Assistant Director and the NGS Migrant Recruiter. The Assistant Director also coordinates educational field trips that are determined to be beneficial for the students. The field trips are always focused on the areas of weakness that have been identified by benchmark scores or State Assessment (STAAR) results. These opportunities help improve the academic achievement of the migrant students. The M.E.P. recruiter works diligently to follow up on all possible leads and to quickly identify and recruit migrant families so that the district can provide the necessary services that the families and students may be requiring. The NGS recruiter conducts home visits to complete the Certificate of Eligibility (COE) forms and to conduct verifications of those families already in the program, so that the families can continue to receive services. Parent meetings are also held by the department to keep them involved and well notified of the academic requirements of the district as well as how the needs of the students are being met. Parents are also informed of how they may be of help in educating their children.

Needs

There is a need to continue to serve our qualifying migrant families with eye and dental care and to continue to provide academic support for our struggling students. There is a need to continue monitoring the students’ progress and intervene in efforts to keep all migrant students performing at grade level. There is a need to continue to provide technological support to assist our migrant students. Many of the migrant families do not own or have access to internet or a computer. Students in need of a laptop can request one from the Temporary Instructional Aides or they can call the Department of State and Federal Programs, Assistant Director to request one. The parent and child then must make an appointment to come in and sign a contract. There are other electronic devices the students can request such as Nooks, calculators, Leapsters, Kineos, etc. It is greatly beneficial for the students to continue to have access to such devices.There is a need to continue employing Temporary Instructional Aides (TIAs) that serve to provide one-to-one support for the struggling students who are failing or falling behind. The support that the TIAs provide greatly impacts student success. Enrichment opportunities for our migrant students should be continued as they focus on improving academic success. These activities provide the students with first-hand experiences, allowing them to gain useful educational understanding of concepts that they may not have the opportunity to experience otherwise. There is a need to employ a NGS/Migrant recruiter to identify, recruit, and provide services to migrant children and youth, including conducting annual residency verification and other identification and recruitment (ID&R) activities according to specific timelines, as outlined in the Texas Manual for the Identification and Recruitment of Migrant Students. In addition, to ensure migrant vans used for recruiting are adequately maintained and serviced. Migrant families need to be identified quickly, as many of these students are often lagging behind academically and it is necessary to provide timely academic support to get them back on grade level. Parent meetings will continue to be organized to keep them in the circle of knowledge regarding the education of the students and their roles as parents.

There is a veritable need to support migrant students in their academic growth outside the school day, so various extra education-based activities such as a Robotics camp, a STEM camp, and field trips to universities (to orient them in college education) have been implemented. These activities will occur during intersession and during the summer.

Extending these activities listed above, SISD's Migrant Education Program seeks to offer the opportunity to attend a 5-day Computer Science Summer Camp which is being offered at St. Mary's University in San Antonio, Texas to middle and high school students. The camp will take place from June 6th through June 10th. The camp will teach the students the basics behind the development of computer software. The attendees will also have an opportunity to explore two major areas of software: computer games and cybersecurity. Students will learn about the software that they cannot see, hear, or touch, but it is the driving force behind any electronic device, from smartphones and computer games to televisions and cars. There is a need to take a total of 36 middle and high school students from the M.E.P. Students who may have to retake a STAAR exam over the summer will be exempt from attending this field trip due to summer remediation courses that they will be required to attend. On the trip, there should be one adult for every 9 students.

For migrant students who will not attend Summer tutoring because of academic issues, there is a need for the district to work with Creative Kids, a non-profit organization which will offer these students an intensive summer art program to which they otherwise would not have access. The participants are able to pick a track that is aligned with the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). These tracks are: painting, photography, digital media/graphic design, culinary arts, silk screening and printmaking.

With regard to SISD personnel that over see the Migrant Education Program, there is a need to send individuals to the 2016 National Migrant Education Conference in San Diego, California, from April 24-27, 2016. The conference is hosted by the National Association of State Directors of Migrant Education (NASME), out of Washington, D.C. The purpose of this trip is to provide attendees with training, leadership, and networking opportunities for all persons concerned with the education of migrant children. In order to help close the achievement gap between migrant students and their peers, it is important to take advantage of training and information dealing with the specifics of curriculum and support. It is also important to learn new ways to educate migrant families so that they may be aware of their rights and service opportunities mandated by state and federal law. Raising awareness and learning about new methods to support migrant students is of utmost importance, and ensuring a standardized process that is followed across the country is greatly needed. NASME offers sessions on Identification and Recruitment strategies as well as other sessions that will provide information and practice tools to help our program remain in compliance with guidelines. The Migrant Recruiter will benefit from additional information regarding data entry into the New Generations System and will also benefit from sessions on how to better engage migrant parents in their childrens' academics lives, particularly in the endeavor to help them reach higher education. Naturally, parental involvement is key to improving students' grades, attendance, and goals for college. NASME would be a great learning and networking opportunity to find out what other agencies are doing to improve services to migrant students. Finally, it is important to find out more about scholarship opportunities as well as other available resources.

--Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Intent and Purpose

The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) is the program the district selected seven years ago and has been implemented district-wide for the past four years to address some of the new requirements that came about during the regular session of the 82nd Texas Legislature in 2011. Texas school boards were required by law to adopt new or amend existing board policies that prohibit bullying, including cyber-bullying. State law encouraged, but did not require, school districts to provide staff training on identifying, responding to, and reporting incidents of bullying. Legislation required state agencies to provide school districts with new training resources for students, teachers and other district staff, aimed at raising awareness of behaviors that may lead to bullying.

Strengths

The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program has brought about more awareness to bullying issues. Teachers and students are becoming more informed and they are learning how to handle these situations in a more favorable manner. The district has continued to see less bullying incidents occurring at the campuses and students are feeling safe reporting bullying incidents through the use of the new K12 Anonymous Alerts Reporting System. Students are also moving away from simply being bystanders to becoming defenders and stopping the bullying before it gets out of control. Parents are also using the K12 Anonymous Alerts to report incidents that their children share with them. Through the new reporting system the administrators receive immediate alerts from students that have kept students from getting hurt or hurting someone else. The K12 Anonymous Alerts is a great tool that compliments the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. All the teachers in the district continue to have access to weekly classroom lessons that are developed through the use of Connect with Kids and YouTube videos. The lessons focus on topics that address bullying incidents, bullying behaviors and other related matters. The goal is for all campuses in the district to continue to implement the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program with fidelity in order to decrease the number of bullying incidents at each campus. Bullying Prevention Campus Committees (BPCC) include parent representatives that make a vital home-school connection, helping to ensure the success of the program at the respective campus. Parent Liaisons are required to provide a minimum of three parent workshops throughout the school year that helps the parents understand the program. Parents are informed and invited to be a part of some of the activities related to anti-bullying that the campuses organize. Many of the campuses in the district have implemented the Watchdog Program, a parent component that also helps administrators by having another set of eyes at the campus to monitor students.

Needs

In order to continue our efforts of ensuring district-wide implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, the district will continue to provide trainings for new BPCC members at the campuses and to provide campus support through the Olweus district mentors. District mentors will continue to monitor assigned campuses, to ensure proper implementation of the program. By continuing to provide access to the videos and resources that we have provided for all campuses, teachers can present lessons to students that will teach them how to avoid or properly handle bullying situations. The goal is to see increased gains in bullying reduction in the years to come. There is a need to continue to involve more parents in anti-bullying activities carried out by the campuses so that they are familiar with the initiatives the campuses have in place. Campuses should use the rapid notification system to invite parents to school anti-bullying activities. Campuses should continue to implement the Watchdog Program as it also helps deter bullying incidents and many parents are glad to assist. There is also a need to ensure that the district's certified Olweus mentors receive training in order to stay certified. Recertification is required every 3 years.

--Parental Involvement

Intent and Purpose

The parental involvement program adheres to NCLB and Section 1118 federal guidelines. Parental involvement has always been a center piece of Title I. The purpose of the parental involvement program is to support parents and campuses in addressing parent’s needs. This is accomplished by providing trainings, workshops, conferences, educational involvement activities, and events that actively engage parents in the educational process that ensures the success of students’ academic and behavioral success.

Strengths

The district parental involvement program continues to provide families excellent opportunities for involvement while also providing workshops and training that help improve student performance and promote better communication at home with their child(ren). One percent of the district’s Title I funds are set aside to meet the NCLB, section 1118- Parental Involvement Requirements. These monies are then distributed to each campus to provide parent workshops and training through the Parent Liaisons. All 48 campuses at SISD have a parent liaison/CIS to meet all NCLB, section 1118 parental involvement requirements. The statute defines parental involvement as the participation of parents in regular, two-way, and meaningful communication involving student academic learning and other school activities. This ensures parents play an integral role in assisting their child’s learning, parents are encouraged to be actively involved in their child’s education at school, parents are full partners in their child’ education and are included in the decision making and advisory committees, and other activities are carried out that will build the capacity of all parents. This is accomplished by parent liaisons working closely with administrators, counselors, teachers, and school staff to meet the needs of the parents and campus. The District continues its commitment to increase parental and community involvement to improve student academic achievement. The district offers parents a warm and welcoming environment where they feel they are a part of the school system and educational process. We encourage all parents to actively participate in their child’s education by attending the different workshops, trainings, and conferences offered by the district and campuses. Parent liaisons strive to meet the needs of the community by focusing their workshops and trainings on the community's particular needs. The Parent Liaisons with fidelity continue to do a great job of supporting our families by providing sessions based on resources and curriculum provided by the district. The parenting class and workshops help parents provide greater support for their children at home. Some of these workshops help parents get a better understanding of what their children are facing at school. The classes and workshops are helping to bring more parents into the schools. These sessions bolster positive parental partnerships and increase parent participation. Parent liaisons also invite guest speakers to their sessions to inform parents of services and resources they can use. Some services available are Texas Agri-life program, migrant and refugee services, El Paso Behavioral health system, and Colonia’s Program to name a few. The district and campuses promote and hold an annual Father-Son and Mother-Daughter Conference. The district prides itself in having these conferences where parents and their children attend workshops that have been prepared in advance by presenters. Topics include college and career ready, family violence, use of technology, college savings, gangs, laws pertaining to juveniles, STEM, relationships, education, internet safety, bullying, and communication. Parents are also being kept abreast of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program being implemented district-wide. The Parent Liaisons are offering classes and informing parents of the program and the changes which are taking place at the campuses in order to implement the program with fidelity. Parent liaisons invite the SISD police services to talk to parents about bullying and what they can do to protect their children. These session are held after school hours Awareness of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is increasing and parents are having a better understanding of what bullying is and what it isn’t. Our goal is to educate our local community on bullying and to recognize how to intervene if someone is being bullied. We want to increase awareness throughout the community so that our children can feel safe at school and at home. We will continue to promote K12 alerts and offer training at each campus on how parents can use the website or app to report cases of bullying.

Needs

There is a need to increase the level of parental involvement district wide. Parents need assistance in understanding such topics as the state’s academic content and achievement standards, the state assessment, the requirements of Title I, part A, and how to monitor their child’s progress and work with teachers to improve achievement. There is a need for parent liaisons to use the curriculum programs for parents with fidelity. Trainings will continue to focus on better student achievement, college and career ready, safety, and increase parental involvement. Evaluation forms, sign-in sheets and surveys will be analyzed and tabulated and will be used to dictate when and where sessions will be held.

There is a greater need to ensure that administrators understand the importance of parental involvement and ensure that parents feel welcomed at the campuses. The district will continue to offer trainings to administrators on the duties and responsibilities of parent liaisons. It is important that we have a Parent Liaison at each campus that will help meet all Title I parental involvement requirements and build capacity. Staff development for Parent Liaisons will continue to be focused on new ways we can engage more parents on becoming more involved and on providing trainings which focus on improving student academic achievement. We will continue to invite guest speakers from the district and local community that can provide additional support to the campuses on matters such as health, student achievement, and academic resources for parents.

--Private / Non-profit Schools

Intent and Purpose

The intent of Section 1120 of Title I, Part A, is for a participating school district to provide eligible children attending private elementary and secondary schools, their teachers, and their families with Title I services that are equitable to those provided to eligible public school children, their teachers and their families. The purpose is for the Title I program to provide supplemental educational services so that all children have a fair, equal, and significant opportunity to obtain a high-quality education. The district has a Private Nonprofit (PNP) Schools program coordinator who is responsible for coordinating and implementing an effective Title I program to ensure equitable participation of PNP eligible students, teachers and families.

Strengths

To qualify for assistance under Title I, a student must reside within the attendance area of a participating public school located in a low-income area and be failing, or at risk of failing, to meet student academic achievement standards. The services for private school students must be developed in consultation, an essential requirement, between the district and officials of the private schools. In order for area districts to avoid duplication of information sharing and documentation submission, a PNP Committee that includes program coordinators from the El Paso, Ysleta, Socorro and Clint school districts meets regularly with Region 19 staff to plan a yearly Initial Consultation Conference. In addition to planning the annual conference, the committee meets to address compliance related questions, determine the best methods of delivery of services, and coordinate other services that Title I, Part A requires. The Title I services the district provides for private school participants are designed to meet their education needs and to supplement the educational services the private school provides. The district develops vendor contracts in order to hire highly-qualified teachers that provide supplemental instruction based on the needs of the private school. The location, dates, and times for supplemental instruction are part of the on-going consultation process with individual private schools and include after-school tutorials, pull-out intervention support, and/or summer school programs. The allocation of funds to support the eligible private school participants includes money for parental involvement activities. The private schools use their funds for parental involvement to purchase materials for sessions with the parents of Title I eligible students. The PNP students and their parents who reside in the district boundaries receive invitations to SISD’s annual Father-Son and Mother-Daughter conferences. To ensure that the PNP teachers of Title I eligible students receive quality support for instruction in the classroom; the teachers can attend SISD staff development workshops.

Needs

The district needs to continue participating in the regularly scheduled meetings of the PNP Committee held at Region 19 in order to assist with Initial Consultation Conference planning and to receive current information of any guidance for Title I implementation as it relates to private schools. The districts PNP program coordinator needs to meet on an on-going basis with private school officials to ensure that the best supplemental academic support is available to eligible students. To meet the academic needs of eligible students attending participating private schools, the district needs to develop vendor contracts with highly qualified teachers to provide supplemental instruction. Parental involvement and staff development activities also need to continue through the purchase of resources and materials, invitations to district events, and / or coordination with activities provided by Region 19.

--Schaeffer Halfway House

Intent and Purpose

Schaeffer Halfway House is a transitional living center under the direction of the Texas Youth Commission that houses juveniles who are rehabilitated and transitioned back into society. Because Schaeffer House is within the boundaries of the Socorro Independent School District (SISD), it is incumbent upon SISD to provide GED instruction to all students housed at Schaeffer House who are 17 and 18 years old and do not have the required credits to receive a high school diploma. The students who do have high school credits and are able to meet the required number of credits for high school graduation receive their education through KEYS Academy. The ultimate goal is to is to help the students transition back into school and continue their education if they wish to do so, or prepare them to go out into the workforce and obtain a job.

Strengths

Socorro Independent School District employs a full time teacher to provide GED instruction and Career and Technical Education (CTE) classes to the students residing at Schaeffer Halfway House. The GED classes are provided for those students who have been identified as not having enough credits to receive a high school diploma. The GED instruction is provided within the Texas Youth Commission (TYC) transitional living center (Schaeffer Halfway House). Because the students live within the confines of the facility, parental in-put is for the most part non-existent. However, the TYC social workers collaborate with outside agencies to address the needs of the students. The students are also provided with the opportunity to attend a CTE course. Furthermore, the students are exposed to 8 Independent Living Modules that help prepare them for their transition into society. The primary instructional goal is to engage the students in meaningful learning experiences (to include obtaining their GED) that will help connect the classroom curriculum to the real world. The curriculum is technology driven. The GED classroom has 8 computers with internet connection. The users are the GED instructor and the Schaeffer Halfway House youth enrolled in GED instruction. The GED instructor is responsible for managing the applications to include creating the users on the application. The internet connection, server and maintenance of the computers will be performed by the SISD Information Technology support staff. The curriculum for the GED program is technology based. It has been of great assistance in allowing an increased number of students to acquire their GED diploma. The curriculum also improves the students' computer proficiency. Beyond GED instruction, students use the technology to access undergraduate education opportunities as well as FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). Workforce development is initiated through the implementation of software called Career Cruising. This software gives further insight as to where the student can pursue career opportunities based on outcomes from instruments used within this software. Thereafter, placement services are provided to assure students are employed in appropriate positions. The classroom has and IWB that the district has installed in order to facilitate classroom instruction. The students receive accelerated instruction so that they have an opportunity to obtain their GED before being released.

Needs

There is a need to continue to provide educational opportunities to students at Schaeffer Halfway House as it is a state requirement. The new changes that have been implemented in the new GED Exam require different GED software and new GED textbooks for instruction. There is a need to look into the possibility of acquiring better internet connection at the facility. The current internet access is slow and students are continuously booted out of the system, slowing down the learning process. There is also a need to provide staff development for the full time teacher so that she can support the students with appropriate GED instruction. In efforts of providing better employment opportunities for the students at Schaeffer Halfway House, there is a need to continue to employ a full time teacher that can continue to provide both GED Instruction and CTE classes for the students. This allows for greater opportunity for success for the students once released and it decreases the chances of the students falling back into the prison system. There is a need to improve the process currently in place obtaining testing vouchers when students are ready to take the GED Exam. In order to better serve the students, the length of time waiting to be tested needs to be reduced. Faster test results will allow students to begin studies on other content areas they may still need to test on. The Superintendent at Schaeffer House is working with the district to see what can be done to speed up this process. The students who reside at Schaeffer Halfway House are serving their final days or months there at the facility, and it is vital that they pass their GED Exam and/or are prepared to go out into the workforce or can enroll in a technical school of their choice.

Administrative Services

Intent and Purpose

Administrative Services will strive to provide a safe and healthy environment for all students, staff and community members in a professional and friendly manner.

Health Services (School Nurses)

Intent and Purpose

The primary purpose of the Socorro Independent School District's school health program is to promote, protect, maintain, and improve student, staff, and community health to its optimal level. The program assures a safe and healthy environment that is conducive to learning.

Strengths

School Nurses are on the front lines of emergency response. Their input and experience are vital in school emergency preparedness. School nurses were asked to implement a Campus Emergency Response Team and ALL Teams members had to be certified in CPR. The Health Services Department conducted 21 CPR classes and certified 420 staff members.

Needs

School nurses expressed concerns in coordinating their Emergency Response plans with school administrators and staff in being better prepared in the event of a school mass emergency. There is a need to attend the Annual South West School Nurse Conference. The National Association of School Nurses has been invited to present on School Emergency Triage Training, a program for School Nurses. The Goal is to provide school nurses with the knowledge, skills, and resources to perform as leaders of First-Aid teams in response to mass casualty events occurring in schools. The hope is that school nurses will be better prepared with the knowledge and confidence to train their campus Emergency Response Teams in responding to an emergency situation at their campuses.

Human Resources

Intent and Purpose

The Human Resources Department supports the District's goals and objectives by providing quality and timely service to all stakeholders assuring respect and confidentiality. The Department actively assists administrators in recruiting, hiring, and retaining the necessary highly-qualified personnel for their campuses and/or departments; assists district administrators in implementing district policy and procedures through timely training; assists in the development of employees' potential through educational opportunities provided by local and Title II funds; and assures a safe workplace that is free of any form of harassment or discrimination.

Highly Qualified Teachers

Strengths

Socorro ISD promotes excellence among all stakeholders. As educators, it is the expectation of the District, that we have the necessary credentials in order to promote excellence among all stakeholders. Socorro ISD is committed to ensuring that every student is provided with highly qualified teachers and staff. To that end, all applicants recommended for hire are screened to ensure they meet the criteria to be considered highly qualified for the position in which they are recommended. In addition, all current employees are accountable for ensuring that their certification and credentials are up to date and continue to meet the requirements for the No Child Left Behind Act.

Needs

There is a need for SISD to continue ensuring that all appropriate staff members are Highly Qualified as defined under the No Child Left Behind Act. Highly Qualified staff members are a vital component in ensuring that our children attain academic success. Highly Qualified staff members have the knowledge and skills needed to provide quality instruction and interventions for the varying students’ needs in SISD.

Library Services

Intent and Purpose

The Library Services program supports all students, librarians, teachers, and the learning community of the schools, in the development of successful learning cultures through quality collections of print and online resources and the teaching of information literacy.

Strengths

The strengths of the Library Services and campus Library programs include student and educator access to a variety of up to date and relevant resources that support the curriculum and reading needs and programs adopted by the District and which address School Library Programs: Standards and Guidelines for Texas levels for effective school library programs. The School Library Media Specialists provide training in the effective integration of these online resources through the development of literacy skills and quality instruction for teachers and students through library and classroom instruction. These resources and skills are essential in ensuring our students are college and career ready.

Needs

There is a need to provide all students and educators access to relevant and reliable sources of online research resources made up of the State Library package for K-12 schools called TexQuest. These online resources are accessible on a remote 24/7 basis to all SISD learners and integrated within library and classroom instruction. There is also a continued need to provide all students with research skills, such as note-taking and citation making, through the NoodleTools online program that will prepare them for success in college and career research. This tool is leveled beginning with elementary, progressing to middle school, and continuing through high school and college. Students and educators should be ensured access to TeachingBooks.net, an online author and teacher resource program that provides classroom support to the study of authors and literature studies, grades K-12. Finally, there is a need for the District Professional Library to continue to purchase Professional eBook resources that will be accessible to all teachers and educators through a web-based FollettShelf of digital titles that will support staff development and research.

Police Services

Intent and Purpose

It is the mission of the Socorro ISD Police Services Department to provide services with integrity and dedication, to preserve life, to enforce the law, and to work in partnership with the City and County of El Paso and other law enforcement agencies in order to enhance the quality of education and life in our community.

Strengths

The Department of Police Services provides progressive presentations to students and staff. Socorro ISD Police Officers as well as Security Officers give presentations in the area of safety to ensure that students feel safe by learning about safety in school as well as in the home. Presentations include District/Campus emergency procedures, emergency preparedness, and personnel safety concerns. Students and staff members have better understanding of emergency preparedness and why it is important. As campuses perform the district-mandated emergency drills throughout the year, students and faculty are able to understand the process and procedures taken to ensure that all campus occupants are safe and confident to perform the tasks needed of every individual to assist in an emergency situation. As individuals are trained and prepared, it will help ensure the safety of all students, staff, and visitors.

The Department also provides presentations to students and parents on the importance of attendance. Attendance Officers educate and inform parents as well as students of the Texas laws mandating students be present in school. Many parents and students are not familiar with Texas attendance laws. By informing parents and students early in the year, it is a goal of the Department to increase the attendance rate for Socorro ISD. Attendance Officers work with campus Attendance Clerks and campus administrators to reach their target at-risk populations.

Police and Security Officers presentations also educate and inform students, parents, and staff members of Texas laws and district/campus policies pertaining to student discipline. Knowledge and understanding of laws and policies help reduce the number of incidents. By educating parents and students early in the year it is a goal of the Department to decrease the number of disciplinary incidents for Socorro ISD.

Needs

There is a need to maintain staffing levels to ensure the presence of an officer at every campus. High visibility prevents emergency situations, because offenders are less likely to commit an act in the presence of a police officer. It is important to ensure the presence of a police officer to reduce response times to on-campus incidents. The presence of an officer assists administrators and prompts an immediate response to any emergency situation. Officer presence is a resource as well as a deterrent.

There is a continued need for the Department of Police Services to post a schedule of monthly drills to meet state/district mandates, for safety and audit drills. The schedule will ensure that all drills are conducted on the campus level in a timely manner. By performing emergency drills, students and staff will have better understanding of emergency preparedness and the roles they will perform. The District EOP Manager will train all campuses in multiple emergency scenarios.

There is a need to train a minimum of one administrator on each campus in National Incident Command Systems and National Incident Management Systems. NIMS and ICS will prepare administrators for the role of leaders in emergency situations. It will prepare administrators in the same field of training that first responders and other emergency agencies train in.

Public Relations

Intent and Purpose

The SISD Department of Public Relations exists to communicate accurate, timely information to engage stakeholders in the success of students and schools. The team is comprised of professional, creative artists, writers, technicians and support staff who strive to deliver excellent customer service to reflect transparency in the District.

Strengths

-SISD-TV News The SISD-TV news program has served as an important vehicle to deliver news, student achievements, staff success and district highlights for the entire SISD community. It is a way to communicate important messages in an engaging, easy to access format and serves as an archive of district news on the district’s YouTube channel. Producing an interactive SISD-TV news program highlighting the district’s strategic directions offers the opportunity to deliver key messages on topics such as safety, college and career readiness and community partnerships in the same easy to access format. It also offers the opportunity for the Superintendent to address the SISD community and general public in this innovative news show.

-Facebook Polls The District’s Facebook page is an excellent social media tool to deliver quick news flashes, student and staff achievements, information on school and/or district events, and key messages on district initiatives. The Facebook page has been useful in delivering daily messages and answering questions from parents. Posting Facebook polls allows us to gain insight into parents’ opinions about district initiatives and the idea of a team mentality. We can use the Facebook polls to initiate feedback on how to improve teamwork and unity in the District.

-SISD e-News The SISD e-News community newsletter is delivered to parents, business and community members who have signed up to receive the publication via e-mail. It is a useful tool to deliver key messages from the district about the latest news, student and staff achievements, school and district events, and district initiatives. By regularly delivering the SISD e-News to key SISD stakeholders it provides them with a consistent stream of news and updates from the district. Parents, business leaders and community members receive important and relevant information for student success straight into their e-mail inbox. It also gives them direct access via links to the district website, photo gallery, YouTube page and Facebook page.

-District Facebook Page The district’s Facebook page and Twitter feed are excellent social media tools to deliver quick news flashes, student and staff achievements, information on school and/or district events, and key messages on district initiatives. The Facebook page and Twitter feed have been useful in delivering daily messages and answering questions from parents. By sending more Facebook and Twitter messages about school or district events, it keeps parents, business and community members informed about SISD. These social media tools continue to be important resources in disseminating timely, accurate information about the district to a large audience in a quick and effective manner.

-Street Teams The Socorro ISD Partners in Education Program strives to cultivate partnerships that are collaborative, dynamic and rewarding. The Street Team helps to achieve the overall goal of creating relationships that are highly responsive to the needs of both businesses and the school district. In developing these relationships, SISD embraces a spirit of teamwork where students, educators and the community come together to shape great minds and a great school district. The exchange of ideas and shared initiatives moves SISD and the business community forward to reach their goals. The Street Team is designed to publicly promote district initiatives and to educate the community about the good things happening in Socorro ISD through the use of printed materials posted in business establishments. The team assists in communicating consistent messages from and about SISD in the communities that our parents and students are also consumers in.

-Power Lunches The Partners in Education Program has made a positive impact on our district and has been possible thanks to the generosity and vision of our business community. It has allowed us to draw some of the city’s finest faculty, build state-of-the-art facilities, and create model educational programs and promote reciprocal partnerships with the business community. Power Lunches help further support the success that PIE has generated for the district. Power Lunches are designed to invite businesses to network with other businesses already involved with the district. In addition, the lunches give the opportunity to deliver information about district goals and initiatives and gain valuable feedback from our business and community partners.

Needs

-Ammerman Training There is a need to provide Ammerman Training on conflict resolution for the SISD leadership team, as it is an effective communication course that helps educators to utilize best practices and skills to deliver key messages across to different audiences, including parents, media, and SISD stakeholders. The training focuses on various communication situations, such as dealing with the media, crisis communications, or conflict resolution. The media and crisis communication training was offered to the leadership team last school year. The Ammerman Training on conflict resolution will offer principals and administrators practical guidance on reducing anger when dealing with parents or others who have concerns or complaints about school issues. The training will be useful in providing what works and what does not work when dealing with an angry public that is upset about school issues.

There is a need to provide for the costs of printing associated with the publication of School Report Cards, as required by the Texas Education Agency. Each district is required to inform parents/guardians of the performance of the district and its campuses with regard to state assessment results from the previous year.

Secondary Education

Intent and Purpose

The goal of the Secondary Education Department is to improve the quality of education for all students by providing leadership in the development and implementation of instructional programs, so strong and inviting, that every student will be prepared and motivated to successfully complete challenging course work and continue their education beyond high school graduation. It is also a goal to increase the level of all students' performance by establishing benchmarks, aligning instructional content, and assessing data in compliance with No Child Left Behind requirements.

Career and Technical Education

Intent and Purpose

Career and Technical Education is a vital component of the high school curriculum. For many students, it represents as much as a third of their high school experience. It is a critical component in meeting the needs of students in academic achievement, career exploration, career preparation, and leadership development. Successful transition to postsecondary education, work, and/or the military is one of the goals of SISD's educational system.

Strengths

Technology, software, equipment and supplies have been provided to the core area that CTE supports. Anatomy & Physiology, Biomedical Sciences, Principles of Technology and Engineering have all received materials to ensure curriculum is taught with an application approach. Students in all CTE high school programs have an opportunity to challenge at least one industry certification and most sequences have at least one articulated course.

Needs

There is a need to ensure that administrators and teachers understand the requirement of House Bill 5. There is also a need to ensure that a higher percentage of our students served in Bilingual and Special Education programs are receiving certifications.

Summary

For the 2015-16 school year, substantial and elevated rigor surrounding our students' academic performance standards and expectations when coupled with the significant reduction in resources and revenue will demand that all school districts across Texas, but especially those districts with student demographics deemed highly at-risk, allocate all available resources in a thoughtful, deliberate and purposeful manner.

When coupled with the tandem of the Eduphoria assessment software and the iStation; an English language proficiency diagnostic tool; teachers will be able to quickly and regularly assess and monitor the progress of their students.

SISD staff members have established themselves as genuine powerhouses of creativity and hard work. Without their diligent action, student success would be difficult, if not impossible, to attain. The District invests in the betterment of its employees in order to bolster student achievement. While many items, such as training sessions, are made available to help staff members to develop their abilities, it should be stated that even more is necessary to ensure favorable outcomes for the future of District students.

Parents are the most powerful influence on the education of children, and SISD is proud to have many programs in place in order to secure their involvement. Never before has it been so evident that it truly does take a village to raise a child. This is why SISD has instilled within its functions the effort to include parents and community members in the education of students. The Parent Liaison program, Communities In Schools, Inc., and the Partners in Education program are only three excellent verifications of this endeavor. An undeniable need with regards to this is that more parent-community involvement must occur. With the positive presence of parents and community members, student achievement will be boosted to an even higher level.

In conclusion, the Socorro Independent School District continues to invest in Teaching, Learning and Leadership from all stakeholders. With this esprit de corps, we are confident that we will continue our legacy of success well into the future. We thank all parties for their participation and contributions in the development of this District Improvement Plan.

Grad001

State Budget
Object Code Description Gifted & Talented
21
Career & Technology
22
Special Education
23
Bilingual Education
25
High School Allotment
31
Totals
6112 SUBSTITUTES $16,480.00 $25,200.00 $58,167.00 $178,610.00 $1,000.00 $279,457.00
6118 EXTRA DUTY PAY $53,600.00 $293,000.00 $1,056,170.00 $771,325.00 $46,500.00 $2,220,595.00
6119 PROFESSIONAL SALARIES $165,426.00 $8,576,583.00 $18,440,504.00 $352,677.00 $1,829,995.00 $29,365,185.00
6121 OVERTIME-PARA/AUX/OTH $0.00 $2,400.00 $6,900.00 $0.00 $0.00 $9,300.00
6125 PART TIME WORKERS $0.00 $15,000.00 $0.00 $85,550.00 $59,875.00 $160,425.00
6129 SUPPORT SALARIES $0.00 $58,545.00 $6,517,784.00 $35,180.00 $0.00 $6,611,509.00
6139 EMPLOYEE ALLOWANCE $2,784.00 $6,864.00 $249,955.00 $11,040.00 $0.00 $270,643.00
6141 SOCIAL SECURITY/MEDICARE $2,400.00 $122,132.00 $362,484.00 $15,381.00 $26,553.00 $528,950.00
6142 GROUP HEALTH & LIFE INSURANCE $12,042.00 $957,382.00 $4,078,365.00 $36,126.00 $202,788.00 $5,286,703.00
6143 WORKERS' COMPENSATION $733.00 $37,853.00 $178,403.00 $4,612.00 $8,119.00 $229,720.00
6146 TEACHER RETIREMENT/TRS CARE $3,385.00 $164,758.00 $443,424.00 $11,230.00 $35,343.00 $658,140.00
6149 OTHER EMPLOYEE BENEFITS $1,848.00 $106,177.00 $340,358.00 $14,659.00 $21,309.00 $484,351.00
6219 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $0.00 $0.00 $15,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $15,500.00
6222 STUDENT TUITION PUBLIC SCH $0.00 $0.00 $20,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $20,000.00
6249 CONTRACTED MAINTENANCE & RPR $99.00 $4,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $4,099.00
6269 RENTALS/OPERATING LEASES $2,000.00 $12,500.00 $9,751.00 $7,000.00 $0.00 $31,251.00
6295 MS LICENSES $115.00 $8,300.00 $4,000.00 $373.00 $0.00 $12,788.00
6299 MISCELLANEOUS CONTRACTED SVCS $11,900.00 $23,200.00 $79,600.00 $12,883.00 $755,772.00 $883,355.00
6319 MAINT & OPERATIONS SUPPLIES $0.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $2,000.00
6321 TEXTBOOKS $11,000.00 $60,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $268,456.00 $339,456.00
6329 READING MATERIAL/ONLINE SUBSCR $19,700.00 $72,500.00 $2,180.00 $42,627.00 $8,832.00 $145,839.00
6339 TESTING MATERIALS $42,445.00 $0.00 $5,000.00 $35,300.00 $164,930.00 $247,675.00
6395 TECHNOLOGY/AV EQ/SW UNDER $5K $48,450.00 $714,010.00 $57,232.00 $79,225.00 $2,000.00 $900,917.00
6396 FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT UNDER $5K $0.00 $100,000.00 $10,700.00 $0.00 $0.00 $110,700.00
6399 GENERAL SUPPLIES $105,528.00 $784,600.00 $156,541.00 $263,982.00 $35,324.00 $1,345,975.00
6411 EMPLOYEE TRAVEL $19,675.00 $290,000.00 $26,720.00 $25,350.00 $85,616.00 $447,361.00
6412 STUDENT TRAVEL $107,273.00 $0.00 $500.00 $850.00 $29,400.00 $138,023.00
6419 NON EMPLOYEE TRAVEL $0.00 $0.00 $2,000.00 $0.00 $2,000.00 $4,000.00
6494 TRANSPORTATION EXP $21,005.00 $20,000.00 $20,343.00 $5,750.00 $350,400.00 $417,498.00
6499 MISCELLANEOUS OPERATING EXP $3,300.00 $55,500.00 $3,900.00 $3,300.00 $1,425.00 $67,425.00
$651,188.00 $12,512,504.00 $32,146,481.00 $1,993,030.00 $3,935,637.00 $51,238,840.00


State Compensatory Education Budget
Object Code Description Accelerated Education
24
Disciplinary
28
SchoolWide SCE
30
6112 SUBSTITUTES $3,000.00 $1,000.00 $0.00
6118 EXTRA DUTY PAY $3,000.00 $30,500.00 $2,348,704.00
6119 PROFESSIONAL SALARIES $170,883.00 $1,104,513.00 $11,099,848.00
6121 OVERTIME-PARA/AUX/OTH $0.00 $250.00 $0.00
6125 PART TIME WORKERS $0.00 $13,062.00 $24,385.00
6129 SUPPORT SALARIES $0.00 $391,200.00 $879,545.00
6139 EMPLOYEE ALLOWANCE $3,407.00 $3,316.00 $0.00
6141 SOCIAL SECURITY/MEDICARE $2,479.00 $23,896.00 $171,566.00
6142 GROUP HEALTH & LIFE INSURANCE $18,063.00 $228,799.00 $1,542,477.00
6143 WORKERS' COMPENSATION $758.00 $7,826.00 $54,002.00
6146 TEACHER RETIREMENT/TRS CARE $3,017.00 $24,672.00 $228,766.00
6149 OTHER EMPLOYEE BENEFITS $2,104.00 $20,229.00 $151,875.00
6239 CONTRACTED SVCS REGIONAL ESC $0.00 $950.00 $0.00
6269 RENTALS/OPERATING LEASES $0.00 $9,862.00 $0.00
6299 MISCELLANEOUS CONTRACTED SVCS $0.00 $36,850.00 $385,000.00
6319 MAINT & OPERATIONS SUPPLIES $0.00 $11,800.00 $0.00
6329 READING MATERIAL/ONLINE SUBSCR $0.00 $250.00 $2,000.00
6395 TECHNOLOGY/AV EQ/SW UNDER $5K $0.00 $5,000.00 $450,000.00
6396 FURNITURE/EQUIPMENT UNDER $5K $0.00 $500.00 $0.00
6399 GENERAL SUPPLIES $0.00 $25,019.00 $50,460.00
6411 EMPLOYEE TRAVEL $0.00 $3,100.00 $0.00
6412 STUDENT TRAVEL $0.00 $500.00 $0.00
6494 TRANSPORTATION EXP $0.00 $0.00 $34,640.00
6499 MISCELLANEOUS OPERATING EXP $0.00 $3,000.00 $0.00
$206,711.00 $1,946,094.00 $17,423,268.00


Title I Budget
Object Code Description Title I, Part A Title I, Part C Title I, Part D
Indirect cost $628,501.00 $10,627.00 $722.00
6112 Substitutes $9,600.00 $0.00 $0.00
6118 Extra Duty Pay $18,300.00 $0.00 $0.00
6119 Professional Salaries $532,274.00 $0.00 $8,258.00
6121 Overtime-Para/Aux/Oth $1,970.00 $1,000.00 $0.00
6125 Part-Time Workers $25,194.00 $76,800.00 $0.00
6129 Paraprofessional Salaries $610,445.40 $22,100.00 $0.00
6139 Travel Allowance $13,128.00 $0.00 $0.00
6141 Social Security/Medicare $17,107.01 $1,490.00 $114.00
6142 Health Care $273,907.56 $6,025.00 $2,007.00
6143 Worker's Compensation $7,111.01 $7,090.00 $70.00
6146 Teacher Retirement/TRS Care $102,271.84 $8,960.00 $661.00
6149 Other Employee Benefits $16,532.18 $2,580.00 $118.00
6219 Health Svcs-Prof Services $4,400.00 $4,000.00 $0.00
6249 Maintenance & Ops - Contr Maint/Rpr $0.00 $700.00 $0.00
6256 Instructional Services Telephone (Internet) $3,531.00 $0.00 $0.00
6299 Misc Contracted Services $591,245.00 $5,000.00 $0.00
6311 Maint & Ops-Gasoline $800.00 $500.00 $0.00
6319 Maint & Ops-M&O Supplies $0.00 $200.00 $0.00
6329 Reading Materials $2,951.00 $1,289.00 $0.00
6395 Technology $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00
6399 Supplies and Materials $107,317.00 $14,511.00 $0.00
6411 Employee Travel $26,775.00 $6,000.00 $0.00
6412 Student Travel $0.00 $3,000.00 $0.00
6419 Non Employee Travel $806.00 $0.00 $0.00
6494 Transportation $0.00 $1,000.00 $0.00
6499 Miscellaneous Oper Expense $25,675.00 $1,900.00 $0.00
$3,019,842.00 $175,772.00 $11,950.00


Title II & III Budget
Object Code Description Title II, Part A Title III
Indirect cost $61,247.00 $16,124.00
6118 Extra Duty $1,122.00 $0.00
6119 Professional Salaries $659,440.00 $0.00
6121 Overtime-Para/Aux/Oth $0.00 $0.00
6125 Part-Time Workers $0.00 $584,375.00
6129 Paraprofessional Salaries $35,765.00 $0.00
6139 Employee Allowances $19,395.00 $0.00
6141 Social Security/Medicare $10,215.00 $9,110.00
6142 Health Care $61,600.00 $0.00
6143 Worker's Compensation $6,135.00 $5,470.00
6146 Teacher Retirement/TRS Care $60,335.00 $46,800.00
6149 Other Employee Benefits $8,620.00 $54,715.00
6219 Health Svcs-Prof Services $0.00 $0.00
6249 Maintenance & Ops - Contr Maint/Rpr $0.00 $0.00
6299 Misc Contracted Services $50,000.00 $0.00
6311 Maint & Ops-Gasoline $0.00 $0.00
6319 Maint & Ops-M&O Supplies $0.00 $0.00
6329 Reading Materials $12,500.00 $24,193.00
6395 Technology $0.00 $0.00
6399 Supplies and Materials $12,500.00 $65,453.00
6411 Employee Travel $14,145.00 $0.00
6412 Student Travel $0.00 $0.00
6494 Transportation $0.00 $0.00
6499 Miscellaneous Oper Expense $0.00 $0.00
$1,013,019.00 $806,240.00


Goal 1 SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.
Objective 1.1 For the 2015-2016 school year, SISD will implement a plan of action to ensure that district stakeholders feel safe at school and school events, increasing the number of students that strongly agree that they feel safe by 70 on the next SISD climate survey.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.1.1 Provide progressive presentations to students and staff on a variety of safety related topics and issues.
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Chief of Police Services Daily General funds, Title I, Part A: TBD (extra duty pay) Police Officer STAT Sheet / Sign in Sheets Minimize the number of safety related situations Students and staff will have a better understanding of emergency preparedness. A prepared campus will be a safer campus
1.1.2 Maintain consistent staffing levels to ensure the presence of a Police Services officer at every campus, coordinating with the actions of the Human Relations Department.
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Chief of Police Services; Director of Staffing, Human Resources Monthly None needed Officer Visibility, roster of officers Officer Visibility will minimize the number of safety related situations Minimized incidents due to increased deterrents Minimized incidents due to increased deterrents
1.1.3 Utilize the district and campus Emergency Operations Plan (EOP) to evaluate emergency procedures set forth at both instructional and non instructional facilities.
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District EOP Manager Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed The EOP instructional and non-instructional facility will be revised and completed. The emergency drills will be documented utilizing the drill documentation form. The form will be submitted indicating the completion of the drill. The EOP instructional and non-instructional facility will be revised and completed. The information presented in the drill documentation form will be used to identify areas to address with regard to each drill. The EOP for instructional and non-instructional facility will be revised according emergency drill documentation along with actual events. The EOP for instructional and non-instructional facility will be revised according emergency drill documentation along with actual events.
1.1.4 Provide guidance lessons to students addressing student competencies in college and career readiness.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $325.00 Lesson plans, sign in sheets and sign in at parent meetings Improved feelings of safety Increased feeling of safety from formative evaluations after school counselor guidance lessons Increased feelings of safety on school climate survey
1.1.5 Provide SISD School Nurses with School Emergency Triage Training to be better equipped to respond to a school mass emergency situation. Training will occur at the National Association of School Nurses Conference, held locally.
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District Nurse Manager Fall Semester General funds: $5,500 All School Nurses will have an Emergency Response Team/Plan in place for their school campus School Nurses will verbalize/express confidence that the campus ERT is prepared for an emergency Campus ERT is prepared for an emergency Campus ERT is prepared for an emergency
1.1.6 Facilitate volunteer registration and the criminal background check process for parents, community member, business partners, UTEP Gear UP Program, EPCC School of Nursing Health Rotations, Watch Dogs Program, and Members of the Military at each campus to provide a safe learning and working environment for students and school personnel.
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Assistant Superintendent, Administrative Services; Volunteer Program Coordinator Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Results and billing From Texas Department of Public Safety, number of applications from the campuses Number of criminal background processed through DPS Increase 15% volunteers involved at the campuses Number of registered volunteers and number of service hours given by volunteers
Goal 1 SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.
Objective 1.2 For the 2015-2016 school year, 100% of all SISD campuses will fulfill the requirements for safety audits and safety drills to be prepared for multiple emergency scenarios.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.2.1 Post a schedule of monthly drills to meet state mandates for safety and audit exercises. The District Emergency Operations Procedure (EOP) Manager will work with all campuses so they are able to respond to multiple emergency scenarios.
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Chief of Police Services; District EOP Manager Monthly General funds The District EOP Manager will keep sign in sheets of trainings and recorded documentation of each drill conducted. Organization and preparedness of each campus during emergency drills Scheduled drills will ensure that drills are conducted in a timely manner. Well scheduled drills will create well prepared, confident students and staff.
1.2.2 Implement the use of National Incident Command Systems and National Incident Management Systems.
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Chief of Police Services; District EOP Manager Daily None needed Campus administrators will have certification Organization and preparedness of each campus administration during emergency drills. Administrators will be well versed in NIMS/ICS. Administrators will be prepared for multiple emergency scenarios.
1.2.3 Provide training to all stakeholders to include teachers, school administrators, campus support staff, parents (reunification), non-instructional facilities personnel with regard to emergency drills. Establish a training schedule for campuses in order adhere to required school emergency drills. Also establish a schedule for non-instructional facilities personnel to complete emergency drills.
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District EOP Manager Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed The emergency drills will be documented utilizing the drill documentation form. The form will be submitted indicating the completion of the drill. The information presented in the drill documentation form will be used to identify areas to address with regard to each drill. Each drill will be evaluated in order to provide information in improving the process. The information presented in the drill documentation will be added to the campus/annex emergency operation plan to improve emergency drill process.
Goal 1 SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.
Objective 1.3 For the 2015-2016 school year, the number of bullying-related incidents reported across the district (all campuses) will decrease by 3%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.3.1 Purchase and provide campuses with brochures and posters to communicate with parents and the community members regarding the OBPP and how it is being implemented to help diminish bullying incidents and improve school climate at all campuses.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1000; Title I, Part C: $1000 Purchase orders, Actual brochures and posters, student survey results, attendance rates Measureable increase in the number of students who report feeling safe at school on surveys, increase in attendance rate 2% increase in the number of students who report feeling safe at school on surveys 3% increase in the number of students who report feeling save at school on surveys
1.3.2 Purchase Annual Student Surveys, books, and materials in support of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $2500 (books and materials); Title I, Part A: $60,000 (student surveys) Purchase orders, books Measurable decrease in the number of bullying-related incidents at campuses, measurable increase in student attendance rates 2% decrease in overall bullying-related incidents 3% decrease in overall bullying-related incidents
1.3.3 Provide campuses with the Connect with Kids online video program as a supplemental resource executed in congruence with the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $14,440 (Connect with Kids) Olweus mentor walkthroughs indicating use of the videos and lessons. Decrease in bullying-associated incidents at campuses. Decrease in mid-year bullying reported via K-12 Anonymous Alerts. Decrease in end-of year bullying reported via K-12 Anonymous Alerts.
1.3.4 Purchase access to K-12 Anonymous Alerts for parents and students to encourage safe and anonymous bullying incident reporting.
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Director, State and Federal Programs 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $11,700 (K-12 Anonymous Alerts) Purchase order, incident reports Decrease in bullying-related incidence 2% decrease in overall bullying-related incidents 3% decrease in overall bullying-related incidents
1.3.5 Utilize the SISD Law Enforcement Operations for Safety (LEOS) program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly Title I, Part A: $1000 List of events Diminished incidence of bullying-related and behavior issues. 2% decrease in bullying incidents mid-year. 3% decrease in bullying incidents end-of-year.
Goal 1 SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.
Objective 1.4 By Spring 2016, the percentage of interventions for appropriate academic support will increase by 5% over the 2014-2015 school year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.4.1 Provide a part-time temporary instructional aide (TIA) per campus that will assist with small group instruction, guidance and targeted assistance for all LEP students in all core subject areas.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III, Part A; $800,000 Weekly logs, semi-annual certifications, evaluations, sign-in sheets from professional development sessions Increase overall report card grades, assessments, and state assessment results Increase percentage of ELL students passing rates in core content areas Increase in state and federal accountability
1.4.2 Develop and implement fall, spring and summer intersession ESL academies to Pre-K and K students in need of linguistic support.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession PIC 25, Bilingual Funds: $120,000 Lesson plans, sign-in sheets, student attendance rosters, progress monitoring sheets Increase in language proficiency for each student by domain Increase in OLPT scores and TELPAS scores Increase in state and federal accountability systems
1.4.3 CTE will support academic interventions through Region 19 staff development strategies and CTE curriculum integration of core subject areas to improve student learning.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant Staff development agenda Improved student scores Teacher inventory Teacher survey
1.4.4 Increase SISD homeless student achievement in core content areas through: improved identification and immediate enrollment, timely distribution of school supplies and/or requested articles of clothing, dental and vision screenings, expeditious evaluation of students in need of intervention and/or special education.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Special Education Monthly Title I, Part A: $11,500 Student Residency Questionnaires, Health Referrals, ARMS documentation, sign-in sheets, and agendas Increased enrollment, referrals, improved documentation, enhanced monitoring results Improved report card grades and benchmark assessment results Increase in state assessment scores results by 5% in all core content areas
1.4.5 Provide academic interventions to include intersession, transportation costs, materials, and/or technology equipment purchases to assist homeless students identified most at-risk based on TAKS/STAAR assessment results, retention rates, district initiatives for targeting student achievement, attendance rates, teacher/staff referral, etc.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Homeless Liaison, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester McKinney-Vento Sub Grant: $40,996 (.5 FTEs x 4); Title I, Part A: $10,249 (.5 FTE); Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title I, Part A: $1200 (No Excuses Camp) Contracts for instructional aides Personnel assignment documents, individual student PEIMS data, tutoring logs Increase on report card grades, attendance rates, benchmark scores Increase in state assessment results, promotion, graduation rates
1.4.6 Provide funds for supplemental instructional support, Highly Qualified teachers for tutoring, and/or summer school services to students attending Private-Nonprofit schools along with technical support to house data on a web-based system and mail annual Intent to Participate invitations to all area Private-Nonprofit schools through ESC Region 19.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester, 4th 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $13,800 Contract submission for Highly Qualified teacher to provide supplemental instruction Improved student performance in regular classroom Report card grades Improved yearly assessment scores
1.4.7 Provide scientifically research-based supplemental resources, such as Stemscopes, ScienceSaurus, equipment and materials for instruction and/or intervention materials in the entire core curriculum.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Science Daily, Weekly, Every 9 weeks Title II: $ 220,000; Title I: $14,000 (Stemscopes) Purchase Orders, materials, usage reports, contract Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans Unit assessments End of year student scores to include classroom grades and state assessments
1.4.8 Provide scientifically research-based supplemental resources, equipment, and materials for Social Studies instruction, such as Thinking Maps and Reading and Writing Through Social Studies books.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Daily, Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $4,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark Increased score in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results and K-7 final report card grade
1.4.9 Provide teachers with materials, resources, activities, and strategies, including ,but not limited to, content-based resources in all areas pertaining to Social Studies K-12, including, but not limited to, Texas History, World Cultures, World Geography, U.S. History and Government and Economics.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Daily, Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $4,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results and K-7 final report card grade and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
1.4.10 Instructional Officers will provide Intervention Conventions prior to every intersession to assure targeted interventions in all content areas.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $10,000 Teacher attendance reports, campus visits documenting evidence of strategies Increase in student participation during intersession, observed positive learning experiences with students during campus visits Students increase academically and with attendance Student increase academically and with attendance
1.4.11 Instructional Officers will collaborate with campus principals to ensure academic success in the content areas by assisting with planning and follow-ups on staff development efforts.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Teacher attendance reports, walkthrough data, campus visits Increased student learning evident through grades, unit assessments and state assessments Student increase academically and with attendance Student increase academically and with attendance
1.4.12 Provide data-driven, research-based interventions that engage students in higher level thinking and are aligned to the TEKS.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $29,998 (added 2-13-15) Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing / advanced levels
1.4.13 Provide funds for supplemental instructional materials for SISD Title I eligible students attending Private-Nonprofit schools.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; PNP Liaison Spring Semester Title I, Part A: $703 (St. Pius X School) Needs Assessment, Purchase Orders Improved student performance in regular classroom Report card grades Improved yearly assessment scores
Goal 1 SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.
Objective 1.5 For the 2015-2016 school year, the District attendance rate for all students will increase by .25% over the attendance rate of the previous year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.5.1 Implement the use of 4 master social workers and CIS coordinators at the various campuses to assist students to acquire resources to improve academic performance, increase self-esteem, and develop social skills.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; Campus Administrators Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: (4 FTEs) $240,000; SCE: CIS (21 FTEs) $345,000;Title I: $345,000; Title I: 1 (FTE) $35,000 Social worker’s and/or CIS coordinator’s student conference logs/student documented cases Improved academic achievement; improved attendance rates At least .12% increase in attendance rate; improved midyear academic performance .25% increase in attendance rate; improved end-of-year academic performance including state assessment scores
1.5.2 Provide progressive presentations to students and parents on the importance of attendance and attendance-related issues.
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Chief of Police Services Monthly General funds Attendance Officer STAT Sheet / Sign in Sheets Minimize the number of attendance related situations, increase in district attendance rate. Officer presentations will educate parents and students of Texas Attendance laws. Educating parents and students will result in an increase in district attendance rates.
1.5.3 Review and revise transportation policies to ensure continuity of attendance and academic support for Homeless and Foster Care students.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester None needed Agendas Improved attendance rates of students in foster care Attendance data Improved attendance and yearly assessment scores
Goal 1 SISD will ensure a safe school environment for students, staff, and community members by implementing both current and new initiatives to address safety concerns, keeping safety a top priority.
Objective 1.6 For the 2015-2016 school year, the total number of district-wide disciplinary incidents will decrease by 5%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.6.1 Provide progressive presentations to students and staff on Texas law as well as district/campus policies on conduct.
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Chief of Police Services Monthly General funds Officer STAT Sheet / Sign in Sheets Lowered number of student referrals Officer presentations will educate students and staff of Texas laws and district/campus policies. Educating students and staff will result in a decrease of student disciplinary incidents.

Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.1 By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, 100% of SISD teachers will be familiar with the requirements of House Bill 5.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.1.1 CTE Facilitators will meet with instructors during the Fall 2015 semester to insure they are familiar with the requirements and how to implement House Bill 5 to it’s full extent.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Fall Semester None needed Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets Improved awareness of House Bill 5 requirements among teacher, parents, and community members Increased number of teachers aware of House Bill 5 requirements Increased number of parents and community members notified of House Bill 5 requirements
2.1.2 Meet with District Service Center department leaders to disseminate information and provide updates regarding the requirements of House Bill 5.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Meeting agendas and sign in sheets Increased awareness of House Bill 5 requirements amongst district departments Compliance with House Bill 5 requirements by the district Compliance with House Bill 5 requirements by the district
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.2 For the 2015-2016 school year, the District will continue to implement a College and Career Ready Strategic Plan at 100% of its campuses.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.2.1 Increase SISD Migrant student readiness (early childhood)and achievement in core content areas through: timely distribution of school materials, supplies and/or requested articles of clothing, dental and vision screening, expeditious evaluation and monitoring of students in need of intervention, provide Temporary Instructional Aides for struggling and "Priority for Service" migrant students. During summer school, employ a teacher to work with elementary and middle school students during a summer engineering camp.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $84,446; Title I, Part C: $7,000 (summer engineering camp including teacher and kids) Sign-in sheets, agendas, monitoring visits Improved report card grades and benchmark assessment results Increase in student passing rates, sign-in sheets, agendas and monitoring visits Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates
2.2.2 Provide supplemental services to include intersession, all materials, replace existing laptops with more current laptops, snacks, and program costs (including visits to universities) for students in the Migrant Education Program to increase extended academic opportunities through enrolling them in various programs (Robotics Camp, Educational Field Trips, and Reading Program) that will focus on Science, Reading and/or Math. Include the provision of Kajeet mobile internet access for laptops.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Summer Intersession, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $10,000; Title I, Part C: $5,000; Title I, Part C: $15,000 (university visit); Title I, Part C: $6000 (Kajeet); Title I, Part C: $22000 (Science Camp St. Marys'); Title I, Part C: $2500 (Creative Kids) Program agendas, lesson plans, monitoring visits, and sign-in sheets Improved report card grades and benchmark assessment results, increased participation in program activities Increase in student passing rates in core content areas, student surveys Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates.
2.2.3 Meet with the high school counseling staff to verify implementation of the CCRP and House Bill 5 requirements for each program.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; District CTE Counselor; District CTE Staff Spring Semester Carl Perkins Grant Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets Students enrolled in proper Coherent Sequence of courses PEIMS Coding Report PEIMS Coding Report
2.2.4 Collaborate with Technology Services to link the CCRP to pre-registration to help ensure the selected student coherent sequences of courses are completed.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Director, Technology Services; District CTE Counselor Spring Semester Carl Perkins Grant Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets Program is linked and working properly Trial run of Pre-registration Registration
2.2.5 Provide college, technical, and military academy postsecondary awareness opportunities through various means in including student transition guides in 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th grades.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $10,000 Student sign in sheets, student signature for receipt of student guide Improvement in proper course selection, resume and essay writing, FAFSA applications, Apply Texas applications Increase in proper course selection, increase in number of students applying for FAFSA and Apply Texas Increase in the number of students completing FAFSA and Apply Texas
2.2.6 Implement Generation Texas Week to focus on college ready activities appropriate for all grade levels. Implement six collegiate forums to assist high school students and their parents: (Preparing for College Forum, National Collegiate Forum, State Collegiate Forum, Regional Collegiate Forum, Alumni Collegiate Forum, and Military Academy Collegiate Forum).
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $2,000 Copies of counselor lesson plans and activities, sign in sheets, and agendas Improved knowledge of college and career readiness at all levels, PK-12; Increase in the number of students applying for college, universities and scholarships Increased number of students completing Generation Texas Week activities. Increased number of students applying for grants, scholarships and military appointments Increase in the number of students receiving financial aid (grants, scholarships and military funding). Increase in the amount of award money for scholarships, grants and military appointments
2.2.7 College and career ready components will be implemented in professional development sessions in core content areas.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $1,000 Sign in sheets, walkthroughs, support visits, student success Student’s academic increase in content areas student scores increase, walkthroughs Student increase academically and with attendance
2.2.8 Purchase licenses for Unique Learning Systems in order to provide specialized lessons for Special Education students taking the STAAR-ALT.
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Director, Special Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $40,000 Lesson plan documentation, user log-ins, observations during walkthroughs Instructional rounds data in specialized support classrooms: FLS, SLU, ILC and PAS, improvement on the STAAR-ALT Based on walkthroughs, ULS is being implemented in at least 75% of identified classrooms 2% increase in the passing rate of Special Education students on the STAAR ALT test
2.2.9 Provide college preparatory programs such as Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) and SpringBoard in K-8, middle, and high school campuses in support of career/college readiness for students.
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Chief Academic Officer; Campus Administrators; District Advanced Academics Personnel Spring Semester, Fall Semester (General funds; Title I, Part A funds; Local funds; State funds): $200,000; Title I, Part A: $73,000 (Six elementary campuses) Campus planning, meeting agendas, lesson plans Increased number of students participating in programs Report cards, progress reports AVID Certification Self Study Report, Springboard walkthrough reports
2.2.10 Implement the use of the Kindermusik program in order to bolster the academic development of students at the early childhood level.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $386,000 Purchase orders, student rosters, music kits Improved classroom and report card grades Improved scoring on early reading assessments at the middle of the year Improved scoring on early reading assessments at the end of the year
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.3 For the 2015-2016 school year, 100% of SISD students, encompassing all special and sub-populations, will be placed in proper learning environments and proper grade levels to ensure that they reach their full potential.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.3.1 Ensure that each campus LPAC administrator holds monthly meetings to accurately identify, place and serve all ELL students effectively.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; District LPAC Coordinator; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists, Campus Principals Monthly, Every 9 weeks None needed LPAC minutes, agendas, monitoring sheets Accurate data submission to PEIMS for snapshot Verification reports Decrease the number of coding errors on Tyler Munis
2.3.2 Employ a NGS/Migrant recruiter to identify, recruit, and provide services to migrant children and youth, including conducting annual residency verification and other identification and recruitment (ID&R) activities according to specific timelines, as outlined in the Texas Manual for the identification and Recruitment of Migrant Students. In addition, ensure migrant vans used for recruiting are adequately maintained and serviced.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Daily, Every 9 weeks Title I Part C: $45,000.00 (migrant van maintenance) Certificate of Eligibility forms Student rosters, student grades, Vehicle work orders from transportation. Improved academic achievement of migrant students. Mid-year improvement in the classroom grades of migrant students, increased attendance of migrant students. Certificate of Eligibility forms Increased performance of migrant students on state assessments, increased overall attendance of students vs. previous year.
2.3.3 Maintain and improve educational achievement for Schaeffer House students by providing a full time teacher to offer GED instruction and CTE courses. The improvement of educational achievement for Schaeffer House students also includes the purchase of supplies, resources and materials. The teacher provides instruction, guidance, and leadership to the GED students of Schaeffer House as they complete their classwork to take their GED Exam.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Career and Technical Education Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part D: $25,000.00; Title I, Part D: (FTEs 0.5) $22,400 Teacher records, lesson plans, enrollment reports, Pre TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education), number of students completing GED Post TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education), number of students completing GED, promotion and retention reports Schaeffer House student grades, student rosters Schaeffer House student graduation rate, end of year student grades
2.3.4 Provide technology services to Schaeffer House students to complete GED graduation requirements and /or obtain employment after leaving the facility
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Technology Services Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4025.50 Purchase orders of internet service and computers Better scores and GED completion rate Schaeffer House student grades, student rosters Schaeffer House student graduation rate, end of year student scores
2.3.5 Ensure proper placement for Special Populations regarding House Bill 5 via meetings between CTE staff and Diagnosticians.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; District CTE Counselor Spring Semester PIC22 and Carl Perkins Grant Agendas, sign-in sheets IEPs match PGP Diagnostician survey Student schedules
2.3.6 Provide tours for special needs students and teachers to showcase CTED programs offered throughout the district.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; District CTE Counselor Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 and Carl Perkins Grant Tour schedule Number of students enrolled in CTED Programs Student that attend tours Increase in the number of CTED students enrolled
2.3.7 Strategy has been discontinued, but the number has been reserved as a placeholder to maintain the integrity of the strategy numbering scheme throughout the plan. It will be phased out in the next version of the plan.
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2.3.8 Provide students with every opportunity to graduate on time by contracting with LUCHA transcript services to retrieve, if necessary, transcripts for immigrant students from Mexico to the United States entering a SISD high school. SPANTRAN will be contracted to evaluate transcripts for immigrant students coming to the District from countries other than Mexico. SPANTRAN will provide a Graduation Credit Analysis (GCA) to place students into proper grade level and core-content area courses.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling; Academic Compliance Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $25,000 (LUCHA); Title I, Part A: $10,000 (SPANTRAN) Transcript Analysis Form and Student’s AAR Increased number of students graduating with their cohort Increased number of students placed in initial appropriate coursework, decreased number of students repeating course work Four year graduation rates
2.3.9 Ensure appropriately normed assessments and protocols to determine eligibility and skill levels for Special Education students which support instruction.
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Director, Special Education Weekly IDEA-B: 20,000 Eligibility numbers and state performance plan results, PBMAS State and federal accountability standards are met at school and district level Eligibility data, Medicaid rosters PEIMS submission (with eligible students noted)
2.3.10 Provide intervention services for students enrolled in Compensatory Education Home Instruction (CEHI) and Pregnancy-related services program through supports provided by Homebound instructors.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Special Education Weekly SCE (contingent upon 15-16 teacher schedule) Teacher schedules for services provided to students, student rosters, lesson plans Student grades, grade level advancement Walkthroughs, number of students who transition back to school after home bound services Student state assessment data, drop-out data
2.3.11 Provide targeted assistance, supplemental support, and intervention for At-Risk Students to increase student passing rates in all content areas.
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Special Education Daily, Weekly IDEA-B: $116,195 (32 FTEs - Special Education Aides) Personnel Action Forms, duty schedules, signed job descriptions, teacher schedules, student rosters, lesson plans, sign-in sheets Increased state assessment scores for at-risk students Benchmarks, classroom observations State assessment scores, decreased percentage of at-risk students
2.3.12 Provide online connectivity (hot spot), equipment, and instructional materials to aid homebound students.
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Director, Special Education Weekly Special Education: $400/month Lesson plans, work orders, purchase orders, bid list, teacher logs Usage reports Benchmark scores State assessment scores
2.3.13 Develop contractual relationships with other entities to ensure that all Special Education students living within our boundaries receive appropriate services
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Director, Special Education Monthly Special Education: $7,500/year Contracts and payment procedures No parental complaints Mid-year documentation Final billing
2.3.14 Provide access for Special Education students to medical and specialized services within the community and specific to their disabilities to ensure success in the classroom.
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Director, Special Education Monthly Special Education: $10,000/year Purchase orders, executed medical services Increase in academic performance of Special Education students Overall mid-year increase in the scores of Special Education students Overall end-of-year increase in the scores of Special Education students
2.3.15 Nominated and identify students, districtwide, for GT services during the Fall and Spring semesters with the use of various assessment instruments in student’s language of strength to include measures of creativity, abstract skills and academic areas of strength.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Coordinators; Campus GT Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $100,000 Agendas from campus GT committee meetings to discuss placement / non-placement of students. Increased number of students identified as Gifted and Talented GT identification updated lists PEIMS reports, end of Year GT reports
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.4 By January 2016, SISD shall increase the level of instructional rigor across the core content areas, to achieve an overall improvement in student state assessment scores of at least 4%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.4.1 Provide scientifically research-based supplemental resources, equipment and materials for instruction and/or intervention in the entire core curriculum.
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendents, Elementary and Secondary Education; Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Director, Special Education; Director, Career and Technical Education; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling; Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Research and Evaluation Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $635,800; Title II; Title III: $165,000; IDEA-B: $10,000; SCE; Bilingual/ESL: $40,000; CTE; GT Scientifically based-research literature on specific programs; purchase orders; bid list; approved vendors list; agendas and sign-in sheets of professional development where materials were used Program usage reports, increase in students achievement as per benchmarks, 9-weeks grades, and STAAR results Middle-of-year student grades / scores End–of-year student scores to include classroom grades and state assessment
2.4.2 Employ a State Compensatory Education Specialist in the SISD Department of State and Federal Programs to work in collaboration with SCE funded personnel to ensure services for at risk students.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; SCE Instructional Specialist Monthly SCE: $76,000 Personnel Action Form, Signed job description, duty schedule Increased availability of mentoring and academic support for at risk students 2.5% increase in grades and test scores At least 5% increase overall in the core areas; increased state assessment scores of students coded at risk
2.4.3 Provide supplemental State Compensatory Education funded class-size reduction teaching positions to work with at risk students.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; SCE Instructional Specialist Daily SCE: (50 FTEs) $3,000,000 (27: 5th grade teachers) and (23: 6-12th grade teachers) Personnel Action Forms; Signed job descriptions; duty schedules; student rosters; ARMS interventions’ reports Increased grades and increased test scores every 9 weeks 2.5% increase in grades and test scores At least 5% increase overall in the core areas; increased state assessment scores of students coded at risk
2.4.4 Implement the use of State Compensatory Education Intervention (SCEI) Coaches to assist teachers in the delivery of curriculum and instruction, as well as to provide academic support services to at risk students.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; SCE Instructional Specialist Daily SCE: (75 FTEs) $4,500,000 Personnel Action Forms; Signed job descriptions; duty schedules; student rosters; ARMS interventions’ reports; Increased grades and increased test scores every 9 weeks 2.5% increase in grades and test scores At least 5% increase overall in the core areas; increased state assessment scores of students coded at risk
2.4.5 Provide an alternative high school for students at risk of not graduating due to exit level state assessments, and/or lack of credits. Options High School serves as the District’s credit recovery alternative high school.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; Options HS Administration Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: $681,627 State assessment data for each student; plan of action for improvement in state assessment Increased grades and increased test scores every 9 weeks 2.5% increase in grades and test scores At least 5% increase overall in the core areas, increase in number of students graduating, number of credits earned by students; increased state assessment scores
2.4.6 Provide a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP). KEYS Academy serves as the District’s DAEP.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; KEYS Academy Administration Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: (72.50 FTEs) $1,835,723 State assessment data for each student; plan of action for improvement in state assessment Increased grades and increased test scores every 9 weeks 2.5% increase in grades and test scores At least 5% increase overall in the core areas; increased state assessment scores
2.4.7 Ensure the use of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) by all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Lesson plans, walkthroughs Increased passing rate of ELL students Increase in mid-year passing rates of ELL students in all content areas Improved performance of ELL students on state assessments
2.4.8 Facilitate a cross-curricular session (Math/Science) that reinforces problem solving strategies that are found in both math and science projects. Graphing skills and data analysis would be reviewed to build strengths in both Math and Science.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary; Instructional Officer-Math, Elementary; 1st 9-weeks Title II: $1,500 Sign-in Sheets, agendas Improve report card grades and benchmark assessment results, increased participation in program activities Increase in students passing rates in core content areas Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
2.4.9 Support the integration of technology via equipment acquisition, related software, and accessories into the four core subjects of ELAR, Math, Science, and Social Studies.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $500 Purchase orders, technology inventory Samples of student work, increase in student grades and assessment scores 2% increase in overall grades in core subject areas 2% increase in state assessment scores in core subject areas.
2.4.10 Utilize Eduphoria School Objects to track teacher and student progress and to analyze associated assessments. Funding is also provided for the Lead4Ward module in Eduphoria Aware as well as for the acquisition of new servers for Eduphoria School Objects.
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Director, Research and Evaluation 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $80,000 (Eduphoria School Objects); Title I, Part A: $12,750 (Lead4Ward module); Title I, Part A: $28,000 (Server Blades) Student and teacher progress reports District data reports Timely analysis of data will result in increased academic performance of students Increased academic performance of students on state assessments, enhanced analysis of areas of need
2.4.11 Implement the use of STAAR Test Maker by Progress Testing,
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Director, Research and Evaluation 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $75,000 Item Bank used for district benchmarks District data reports STAAR aligned test in Eduphoria Aware District data reports
2.4.12 Provide funding to cover the printing cost of district spring and fall benchmarks and district writing initiative.
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Director, Research and Evaluation Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $117,000 District data District data reports provided to campuses for student progress Analyzing data for student progress District data reports
2.4.13 Provide funding to cover the cost of reports from Pearson, ACT and College Board.
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Director, Research and Evaluation Spring Semester, Fall Semester Testing fund: $30,000 District data reports District data reports District data reports provided to campuses Availability of state and federal assessment data
2.4.14 Provide funding to execute Credit by Exam activities.
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Director, Research and Evaluation Spring Semester, Fall Semester High School Allotment funding: $15,000 Purchase orders, student rosters Acquisition of college credit by students Increased number of students earning college credit (MOY) Increased number of students earning college credit (EOY)
2.4.15 Purchase booklets for SAT/PSAT data report information.
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Director, Research and Evaluation Spring Semester, Fall Semester Academic Services and Gear Up funding: $110,750 Purchase orders, student rosters District data reports District data reports provided to campuses for student progress Availability of state and federal assessment data
2.4.16 Provide teachers with materials, resources, activities, and strategies, including, but not limited to, graphic organizers, note taking skills, writing across the curriculum, and vocabulary strategies.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Daily, Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $10,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans Increased scores on unit assessments and MOY student scores Increased STAAR scores; increased final report card scores
2.4.17 Provide teachers with materials, resources, activities, and strategies, including, but not limited to, content-based resources in all areas pertaining to Social Studies K-12, including, but not limited to, Texas History, World Cultures, World Geography, World History, U.S. History, Government, and Economics.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Daily, Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $4,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results and K-7 final report card grade and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.4.18 Integrate the Math Process Skills into 75% of classroom instruction.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math, Campus Administrators, SCEI Coaches, Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Lesson plans, campus planning agendas, increase of rigor in instruction Improved student success on unit assessments, TCM Progress Monitoring assessment, benchmarks and STAAR Performance Indicators, in-class assessments, informal observations Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks
2.4.19 Utilize the documents from TEKS Resource System (Year at a Glance, Vertical Alignment Document, TEKS Clarification Document, Instructional Focus Document, Unit Assessments Performance Indicators).
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math, Campus Administrators, SCEI Coaches, Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Lesson Plans, planning agendas, increased student success, timely pacing Improved student success on unit assessments, TCM Progress Monitoring assessment, Benchmarks and STAAR Performance Indicators, in class assessments, informal observations Unit TESTS TCM PM Assessments STAAR Benchmarks ISTATION
2.4.20 Use data to drive instruction and planning. Plan standards-based small group instruction and whole group for students on all Tiers.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Small group lesson plans, planning sessions to unpack TEKS, TEKS Academies, increase of students moving into Tier 1 Improved student success on unit assessments, TCM Progress Monitoring assessment, Benchmarks and STAAR Performance Indicators, in class performance, informal observations Performance Indicators, in class performance, informal observations
2.4.21 Instructional support team will increase the rigor of professional development expectations and follow ups at the campus through SCEI academies and other professional development activities.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $5,000 Increase in content area(s) performances for varied schools Increase in student success rate academically Increase in student success in core content areas Increase scores in state and local assessments
2.4.22 Modify curriculum to incorporate differentiated instructional strategies to meet the unique needs of students identfied as Gifted and Talented.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Coordinators; Campus GT Coordinators: GT Trained Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $80,000 Lesson plans Progress reports, student grades Ongoing teacher assessment, informal or formal student feedback Student grades, progress reports and report cards, GT showcase
2.4.23 Use instructional techniques highlighting multiple-intelligence approaches in developing individual and group projects. Promote the development of products that show creative and artistic approaches.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Coordinators; Campus GT Coordinators: GT Trained Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $20,000 Lesson plans Progress reports, student grades, student portfolios, Project displays Ongoing teacher assessment, informal or formal student feedback Student grades, progress reports and report cards, GT showcase
2.4.24 Implement college preparatory curriculum such as Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) and SpringBoard in K-8, middle, and high school campuses in order to increase level or rigor in core content courses.
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Chief Academic Officer; Campus Administrators; District Advanced Academics Personnel Spring Semester, Fall Semester (General funds; Title I, Part A funds; Local funds; State funds): $100,000 Campus planning, meeting agendas, lesson plans, curriculum guides Increased number of students participating in programs Report cards, progress reports AVID Certification Self Study Report, EOC scores
2.4.25 Provide materials/resources to support campuses implementing the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, the Connecting With Kids Program, and the Law Enforcement Operations for Safety (LEOS) Program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $60,000 Coordinating Committee workbook, progress reports 1-3, campus walkthroughs-teacher observations, campus coordinator meeting sign-in sheets Olweus Bullying Prevention Program questionnaire, PEIMS Olweus Bullying Prevention Program questionnaire, PEIMS, number of reported bullying incidents, student/teacher surveys Olweus Bullying Prevention Program questionnaire, PEIMS report-decreased number of bullying incidents
2.4.26 Implement the services of LITCONN and Dr. Erlinda Teisinger to provide critical support, intervention, and progress monitoring in the areas of Reading and Writing for Kinder-5th grade students at Mission Ridge Elementary School.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Principal, Mission Ridge Elementary Spring Semester Title I, Part A: $49,975 Service contract, student rosters Improved reading and writing performance of Kinder-2nd grade students. Improved class grades Improved class grades, student promotion to next grade
2.4.27 Provide funding for students of the Migrant Education Program to attend a Summer STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Math) program in Houston, Texas.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Summer Intersession Title I, Part C: $35,000 Roster of Students, Travel Requests Improved academic performance of migrant students 2% increased academic performance of migrant students in Science and Math classroom grades. 2% increased academic performance of migrant students on state assessments.
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.5 For the 2015-2016 school year, student state assessment scores in Reading and Writing will improve by 4% as compared to the 2014-2015 state assessment scores.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.5.1 Provide tutoring services to students during intersessions and summer.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession SCE: $1.6 million; Title I: $200,000 Student rosters, teacher lists, extra-duty pay timesheets Increase in Reading scores / 9-week; grades, MOY, EOY Minimum of 2.5% increase in classroom Reading assessments 5% increase in Reading scores on STAAR
2.5.2 Ensure the use of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) by all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Lesson plans, walkthroughs Increased passing rate of ELL students Increase in mid-year passing rates of ELL students in all content areas Improved performance of ELL students on state assessments
2.5.3 Plan lessons that utilize the Interactive Note-taking Binder, incorporate high levels/text-dependent questioning, and that implement writing across the curriculum.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $4,000 Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing / advanced levels
2.5.4 Plan targeted lessons that are data-driven and address the TEKS as stated on the TEKS Resource YAG. Use the TEKS Resource System Performance Indicators to increase rigor in ELAR.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $4,000 Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing / advanced levels
2.5.5 Integrate the Balanced Literacy framework into the 90 minute block of Reading, use Close Reading to target specific areas of weakness as indicated by student assessment data, and utilize the CATS folder K-8.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $9801 (added 2-13-15); Title II: $15,000 Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, mproved STAAR passing / advanced levels
2.5.6 Plan instruction using cooperative learning and brain-based strategies.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $26,000 Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing / advanced levels
2.5.7 Prioritize and implement Reading and Word Study notebooks K-5 and use the TEKS Resource rubrics.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $4,000 Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing / advanced levels
2.5.8 Utilize the SISD Milestones (K-5) to monitor student progress and set goals for students.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers; Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing / advanced levels
2.5.9 Implement instructional strategies that address genre studies (expository texts; poetry) and that can be integrated into any lesson to help students be successful in STAAR/EOC Reading.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Secondary ELAR; SCEI Coaches Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $3,000 Genre study binders; student artifacts Fall and Spring benchmark scores; STAAR scores Fall and Spring benchmarks scores STAAR scores
2.5.10 Fund the continued implementation of IStation and C-PALLS to improve student performance.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Secondary ELAR; SCEI Coaches Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $125,000 (istation), $20,000 (C-PALLS); Title II: $10,000 IStation reports Fall and Spring benchmark Scores; STAAR scores Fall and Spring benchmarks scores STAAR scores
2.5.11 Increase the number of secondary campuses implementing Empowering Writers.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Secondary ELAR; SCEI Coaches Fall Semester Title II: $10,000 Writing notebooks Fall and Spring benchmark scores; STAAR scores Fall and Spring benchmark scores STAAR Writing scores
2.5.12 Provide secondary ELAR teachers with strategies on writing from the Write for Texas summer institute.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Secondary ELAR; SCEI Coaches Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $7,000 Writing notebooks Fall and Spring benchmark scores; STAAR scores Fall and Spring benchmark scores STAAR Writing scores
2.5.13 Provide a Writing Teacher Network (WTN) to secondary teachers who will be teaching the writing support courses.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Secondary ELAR; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Secondary ELAR Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Writing notebooks; student artifacts; WTN sign in sheets; campus support visit forms Fall and Spring benchmark scores; STAAR scores Fall and Spring benchmark scores STAAR Writing scores
2.5.14 Purchase and implement the district-wide use of the Lexia Program.
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Director, Special Education Weekly Special Education: $408.46/week or $21,240/year Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets Lexia data logs, improved student academic performance on grades and tests Increased usage according to Fall Lexia data logs, 2% increase in the mid-year scores of Special Education students Increased usage according to Spring Lexia data logs, increased passing rates of Special Education students on state standardized tests
2.5.15 Plan and facilitate a writing workshop in all K-5 classrooms using the writing process.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Elementary ELAR Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $4,000 Lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improved report card grades Performance Indicators, informal observations, common assessments Improved Istation levels, improved STAAR passing/advanced levels and K-5 Writing Initiative
2.5.16 Purchase library books for the purpose of motivating students in the development of Reading skills and to drive for the improvement of Reading scores. This also supports the Blue Bonnet Book Club for 3rd & 4th graders.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $10,000 (Perma-Bond) Purchase order, book list Improved reading skills as demonstrated on classroom grades and assessments 2% mid-year improvement in reading skills as reflected on classroom grades and assessments 3% end-of-year improvement in Reading as reflected on classroom grades and assessments
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.6 For the 2015-2016 school year, student state assessment scores in Mathematics will improve by 4% as compared to the 2014-2015 state assessment scores.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.6.1 Provide tutoring services to students during intersessions and summer.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Refer to funding in Strategy 2.5.1 Student rosters, teacher lists, extra-duty pay timesheets Increase in Math scores / 9-week; grades, MOY, EOY Minimum of 2.5% increase in classroom Math assessments 5% increase in Math scores on STAAR
2.6.2 Ensure the use of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) by all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Lesson plans, walkthroughs Increased passing rate of ELL students Increase in mid-year passing rates of ELL students in all content areas Improved performance of ELL students on state assessments
2.6.3 Implement all 7 components of the Guided Math Framework.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Classroom schedules, planning sessions, lesson plans, professional development sessions Increase student engagement, increase rigor in instructional delivery, increased student success Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, performance indicators Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks
2.6.4 Teach and plan instruction using the new 2012 Math TEKS and engage students in the problem solving process on a daily basis, using the Math Process Skills TEKS.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $29,998 (same amount listed in Strategy 1.4.12 added 2-13-15); Title II: $3,000 Planning session agendas, whole group and small group lesson plans, observations Increase student engagement, increase rigor in instructional delivery, increased student success Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, Performance Indicators Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks, Performance Indicators
2.6.5 Utilize math manipulatives and technology resources (apps/IWB) to effectively teach math concepts.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $7,000 Planning session agendas, whole group and small group lesson plans, observations Increase student engagement, increase rigor in instructional delivery, increased student success Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, Performance Indicators Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks, Performance Indicators
2.6.6 Participate in the unpacking of the Math TEKS to plan and execute instruction. Plan and use the TEKS Resource System and the Performance Indicators to teach new Math TEKS.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $4,000 Planning sessions, lesson plans, Performance Indicators Planning session agendas, whole group and small group lesson plans, observations Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, Performance Indicators, lesson plans Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks, Performance Indicators
2.6.7 Integrate Reading and Writing Strategies, from the Interactive Note-taking Binder into Math Instruction.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $5,000 Planning session agendas, whole group and small group lesson plans, observations Increase student engagement, increase rigor in instructional delivery, increased student success Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, Performance Indicators, lesson plans Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks
2.6.8 Use data and standards to plan whole class instruction, Math workshops, small group instruction
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $3,000 Planning session agendas, whole group, math workshop small group lesson plans, observations Increase student engagement, increase rigor in instructional delivery, increased student success Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, Performance Indicators Unit tests, TCM PM assessments, STAAR, benchmarks
2.6.9 Use TI-Nspire calculators in the classroom daily to support instruction.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches; Teachers (K-5); Instructional Aides Spring Semester, Fall Semester GEAR-UP Funds: $10,000; Title II: $5,000 Planning sessions, lesson plans, observations Increase student engagement, increase rigor in instructional delivery, increased student success Student portfolios, informal observations, common assessments, Performance Indicators Unit tests, STAAR, benchmarks, Performance Indicators
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.7 For the 2015-2016 school year, student grades/benchmark/state assessment scores in Social Studies will improve by 4% as compared to the 2014-2015 grades/benchmark/state assessment scores.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.7.1 Provide tutoring services to students during intersessions and summer.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Refer to funding in Strategy 2.5.1 Student rosters, teacher lists, extra-duty pay timesheets Increase in Social Studies scores / 9-week; grades, MOY, EOY Minimum of 2.5% increase in classroom Social Studies assessments 5% increase in Social Studies scores on STAAR
2.7.2 Ensure the use of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) by all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Lesson plans, walkthroughs Increased passing rate of ELL students Increase in mid-year passing rates of ELL students in all content areas Improved performance of ELL students on state assessments
2.7.3 Provide supplemental services to include intersession, all materials, snacks, and program costs to increase extended academic opportunities through participation in various programs, such as, but not limited to, Archaeology Camps.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $8,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Surveys, student scores, student artifacts Unit assessments, walkthroughs Increased scores in final report card grades, 8th grade STAAR, EOC
2.7.4 Facilitate and/or assist in Project Based Learning opportunities, integrating all the core subjects (Ex: Lemonade Day, Projectile Warfare, etc.)
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks, walkthroughs Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.7.5 Form a K-12 vertical alignment focusing on process skills, using Thinking Maps, reading and writing strategies, brain based strategies, and best practices.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks None needed Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts, lesson plans, surveys, evaluations Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Writing artifacts in Social Studies, district benchmark data, unit assessments Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and Exit Level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.7.6 Form horizontal alignment groups in order to facilitate and assist in, but not limited to, the creation of lesson plans, common assessments, YAGs, pacing guides, study reviews.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks None needed Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts, lesson plans, surveys, evaluations Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.7.7 Provide district common assessments for elementary Social Studies, grades 4 and 5, with the prospect of including grades K-3.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title II: $2,000 Data reports, lesson plans, surveys, assessment results, benchmark exams Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts Increased scores in K-7 final report card grade
2.7.8 Facilitate the professional development of, creation of, and distribution of common assessments for middle school social studies grade 6-8.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title II: $5,000 Data reports, lesson plans, surveys, assessment results, benchmark exams Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results and 6-7 final report card grade
2.7.9 Facilitate the professional development of, creation of, and distribution of common assessments for high school social studies grade 9-11.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title II: $6,000 Data reports, lesson plans, surveys, assessment results, benchmark exams Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, high school benchmarks Increased scores in exit level U.S. History E.O.C. and final report card grades in World History
2.7.10 Implement Constitution Week, in observance of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day, to provide students educational programming on the history of the American Constitution through various activities and contests.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $1,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, pictures, student artifacts, schedule of events Surveys, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.7.11 Facilitate and assist in a mock voting in order to emphasize foundational ideas on good citizenship practices.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Voting results, schedule of events, materials Surveys, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.7.12 Provide newsletters to campuses that include information, such as, but not limited to, events around the city, activities for the month, bulletin board ideas, breakdown of TEKS, interesting facts, and parent home connection activities.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Every 9 weeks Title II: $2000 Student artifacts, surveys Surveys, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
2.7.13 Facilitate an Invention Convention to include 3 categories: Historical Inventions, Future Inventions, and Inventions Using Recycled Materials.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding source in Strategy 2.7.6 School participation, agendas, sign-in sheets Surveys, student scores, student artifacts Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.7 For the 2015-2016 school year, student state assessment scores in Science will improve by 4% as compared to the 2014-2015 state assessment scores.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.7.1 Provide tutoring services to students during intersessions and summer.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Refer to funding in Strategy 2.5.1 Student rosters, teacher lists, extra-duty pay timesheets Increase in Science scores / 9-week; grades, MOY, EOY Minimum of 2.5% increase in classroom Science assessments 5% increase in Science scores on STAAR
2.7.2 Ensure the use of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) by all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Lesson plans, walkthroughs Increased passing rate of ELL students Increase in mid-year passing rates of ELL students in all content areas Improved performance of ELL students on state assessments
2.7.3 Provide supplemental services to include intersession, materials, snacks, and program costs for participants to increase extended academic opportunities for students, including enrollment in various programs (Robotics Camp, Intersession Science Camps).
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary Summer Intersession, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $25,000 Program agendas, lesson plans, monitoring visits, and sign-in sheets Improve report card grades and benchmark assessment results, increased participation in program activities Increase in students passing rates in core content areas, student surveys Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates
2.7.4 Provide opportunities for students to participate in academic activities such as the Socorro Independent School District Elementary, Middle, and High School Science Fairs, and receive awards and recognition for such participation. Advancing students and coordinators will participate at the Regional, State and International Levels with room, travel and per diem accommodations paid accordingly. Judges and coordinators will be provided with breakfast and lunch will be provided to coordinators during tabulation on the Science Fair dates.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $25,000 Sign-in sheets Improve report card grades and benchmark assessment results, increased participation in program activities Increase in students passing rates in core content areas Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates
2.7.5 Provide newsletter to campus that includes information such as, but is not limited to, events around the city, activities for the month, bulletin board ideas, break down of the TEKS, interesting facts and parent home connections.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary Every 9 weeks None needed Copies of newsletter Walkthroughs and survey Unit assessments End of year student scores to include classroom grades and state assessments
2.7.6 Provide opportunities for students to participate in academic activities such as the Socorro Independent School District Invention Convention, to include three categories: Historical Inventions, Inventions Using Recycled Materials, and Future Inventions. Judges and coordinators will be provided with breakfast and lunch will be provided to coordinators during tabulation on the Invention Convention dates.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Social Studies, Elementary Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $3,000 School participation, agenda, training dates Improve report card grades and benchmark assessment results, increased participation in program activities Increase in students passing rates in core content areas Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.9 For the 2015-2016 school year, the overall number of students enrolled in pre-advanced/advanced placement courses and pre-international/international baccalaureate courses will increase by 4% as compared to the overall enrollment for the 2014-2015 year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.9.1 Provide guidance lessons to students addressing student competencies in college and career readiness.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 1.1.4 Lesson plans, sign in sheets and sign in at parent meetings Increase in pre-AP, AP, pre-IB and IB courses for middle and high school students. Increase in pre-AP, AP, pre-IB and IB courses for middle and high school students and an increase of successful completion at 9 weeks and semester. Increase in the number of students successfully completing Pre-AP, AP, Pre-IB and IB courses.
2.9.2 Ensure that scheduling modifications are made at middle school and high school based on individual student needs through the use of inter-campus programs, Pre-Advanced Placement classes, Advanced Placement classes, Pre-International Baccalaureate, International Baccalaureate classes and Dual Credit classes.
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Chief Academic Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel; Campus Administrators; Counselors; GT/AP/IB Content Area Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $50,000 Student schedules, enrollment numbers in Pre-AP, AP, Pre-IB, IB courses, availability of intercampus programs Retention rate of students in Pre-AP to AP courses or Pre-IB to IB courses, enrollments in intercampus programs Progress reports, report cards College credit hours, number of AP and IB exams taken, increase in number of students receiving / qualifying scores on AP or IB exams
2.9.3 Implement college preparatory curriculum such as Advancement Via Individual Achievement (AVID) and SpringBoard in K-8, middle, and high school campuses in order to increase level or rigor in core content courses.
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Chief Academic Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel; Campus Administrators Spring Semester, Fall Semester (General funds; Title I, Part A funds; Local funds; State funds): $80,000 Campus planning, meeting agendas, lesson plans, curriculum guides Increased number of students participating in programs Report cards, progress reports AVID Certification Self Study Report, campus generated reports
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.10 For the 2015-2016 school year, the overall number of students enrolled in dual-credit courses will increase by 4% as compared to the overall enrollment for the 2014-2015 year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.10.1 Continue to add additional Dual Credit courses and pay for books and resources needed for courses.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding, Carl Perkins Grant Purchase orders Number of classes offered Purchase orders Purchase orders
2.10.2 Continue to provide teachers with technology, equipment, and supplies in order to teach TEKS and Articulated/Dual Credit required curriculum.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding, Carl Perkins Grant Purchase orders More students with certification and competency profiles Number of students certified and receiving articulated and dual credit Increase in number of students certified and receiving articulated and dual credit
2.10.3 Provide guidance lessons to students addressing student competencies in college and career readiness.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 1.1.4 Lesson plans, sign in sign in at parent meetings Increase in dual credit enrollment Increase in dual credit for high school students and an increase in successful completion at 9 weeks and semester Increase in the number of students successfully completing dual credit courses
2.10.4 Ensure that scheduling modifications are made at high schools based on individual student needs through the use of Dual Credit classes.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Coordinators; Campus Administrators; Counselors; Dual Credit Content Area Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $10,000 Student schedules, enrollment numbers in dual credit courses, availability of intercampus programs Retention rate of students in dual credit courses, enrollments in intercampus programs Progress reports, report cards College credit hours earned in Dual Credit
2.10.5 Implement college preparatory curriculum such as Advancement Via Individual Achievement (AVID) and SpringBoard in K-8, middle, and high school campuses in order to increase success in dual credit courses.
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Chief Academic Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel; Campus Administrators Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds; Title I, Part A funds; Local funds; State funds Campus planning, meeting agendas, lesson plans, curriculum guides Increased number of students enrolled in dual credit courses Report cards, progress reports AVID Certification Self Study Report, campus generated reports, college credits earned
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.11 For the 2015-2016 school year, the overall number of students participating in ACT/SAT college admissions test administrations will increase by 5%/25% as compared to the 2014-2015 school year, in preparation for post-secondary education.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.11.1 Provide guidance lessons to students addressing student competencies in college and career readiness.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 1.1.4 Lesson plans, sign in sign in at parent meetings Increase in the number of students signing up for ACT/SAT Increase in the number of students signing up for SAT/ACT Increase in the number of students sitting for the ACT/SAT.
2.11.2 Offer the opportunity for high school students participating in the AVID College readiness system to take the PSAT or SAT/ACT.
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Chief Academic Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel; Campus Administrators; Counselors; AVID Campus Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester (General funds; Title I, Part A funds): $80,000 Number of students taking exams Increased number of students taking exams Exam tickets for scheduled tests Exam score reports
Goal 2 SISD students will receive a quality education with rigorous instructional standards that adequately prepares them for the college and career of their choice.
Objective 2.12 By the beginning of the 2015-2016 school year, the numbers of students enrolled in Career and Technical Education classes will increase by 3% as compared to the 2014-2015 Beginning-Of-Year enrollment.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.12.1 Continue to work with campus principals to increase the CTE elective course offerings
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding Course Catalog Number of students added per campus Number of courses added per campus Number of courses added per campus
2.12.2 Support adding Biomedical Sciences at all high school campuses
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Campus Adminstrators Spring Semester PIC22 funding Course sections Increase number of students in Biomedical Compare 2014 to 2015 Number of students in 2015
2.12.3 Offer additional CTED courses to support student Program of Study selections who are served under Special Education. Example: Building Maintenance.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Director, Special Education; Campus Administrators; Diagnosticians; Counselors Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding CTED courses Increased number of courses CTED Course Catalog Courses for 2015 school year
2.12.4 Ensure that campus principals allow students to select CTE courses that are equivalent to their core academic counterpart. Example: Principles of Technology rather than Physics.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Campus Administrators; Counselors Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding Sections of courses offered Number of students enrolled Number of sections Number of students
2.12.5 Continue to coordinate 8th grade and high school campus tours to ensure knowledge of programs offered at all high school campuses.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; District CTE Counselor; Campus Administrators; Counselors Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding Tour rosters Students create their TAP and Verification of Endorsement CCRP report CCRP report
2.12.6 Provide guidance lessons to students addressing student competencies in college and career readiness.
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Chief Academic Officer; Coordinator, Guidance and Counseling Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 1.1.4 Lesson plans, sign in sign in at parent meetings Increase in the number of students selecting proper courses, including CTE courses during pre-registration Increase in the number of students sitting in CTE courses in the appropriate sequence Increase in the number of students successfully completing CTE courses in the appropriate sequence
2.12.7 Students will participate in the new PAS class which focuses on the acquisition of vocational skills and better prepares them for CTED classes.
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Director, Special Education Daily Special Ed Teacher (IDEA-B) (12 FTEs) $800,000 Class Rrosters, projections 10% increase in CTED enrollment for the 15-16 school year Progress reports IEP mastery, report card grades

Goal 3 SISD will recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified faculty, staff, and support personnel to improve student academic performance and to ensure that students graduate college and career ready.
Objective 3.1 For the 2015-2016 school year, the number of teachers that demonstrate increased instructional effectiveness (as measured by PDAS, walkthroughs, etc.) will increase by 4%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.1.1 Provide professional development opportunities to campus teachers, SCE Intervention Coaches, SCE intervention teachers, SCE Instructional Specialist, instructional aides, parent liaisons, CIS Coordinators, and master social workers in order to enhance the academic support services for at risk students to include providing supplies, materials, refreshments, and snacks. Sessions will include “Sensitivity” trainings.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Library Services Coordinator Saturdays, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $200,000; SCE: $175,000 Master Professional Development calendar; Session agendas with topics, dates, hours, presenter(s); sign-in sheets Continuous improved academic performance of at risk students; wider range of ARMS interventions Increased midyear academic performance of students to include class grades and benchmark scores At least 6% increase in end of year academic performance of students, to include class grades, benchmark scores, state assessment scores
3.1.2 Provide training and support of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) to all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of ELPS in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
3.1.3 Continue to recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified Faculty by supporting them through a ACP program for certification and retention.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Director of Staffing, Human Resources Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 Funding, Carl Perkins Grant CTE Highly Qualified Teachers 100% HQ Staff Teachers enrolled in ACP Actual number of Highly Qualified Teachers
3.1.4 Implement the New Teacher Induction Academy to provide a solid foundation for new educators in the district.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $8,000 Attendance sheets and participation expectations and projects assigned throughout the year Teacher success rate and retention of highly qualified teacher Teacher effectiveness through walkthrough data and campus visits and student successes Teacher effectiveness through walkthrough data and campus visits and student successes
3.1.5 Utilize and support the Teacher Mentor Program (Becoming a Friend for Tomorrow’s Future) created by the Academic Services Department. Provide additional professional development training to ensure the success of teacher mentorship, new teacher induction, and continued support.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $5,000 Attendance sheets and participation expectations and projects assigned throughout the year Teacher success rate and retention of highly qualified teacher Teacher effectiveness through walkthrough data and campus visits and student successes Teacher effectiveness through walkthrough data and campus visits and student successes
3.1.6 Purchase/renew a district license for an electronic newsletter from Stetson and Associates, including the Hot Topics newsletter, to provide training and strategies for best practices in differentiated instruction and specially designed instruction to teachers.
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Director, Special Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds: $5000/year Certificates of completion of courses, meeting agendas, purchase orders Campus visit forms, lesson plan documentation, classroom walkthrough data Usage in the classroom, data showing evidence of differentiated instruction and best practices during walkthroughs, increased student scores on common assessments, benchmarks, and released tests Increase in the passing rate on state assessments
Goal 3 SISD will recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified faculty, staff, and support personnel to improve student academic performance and to ensure that students graduate college and career ready.
Objective 3.2 For the 2015-2016 school year, the District will maintain 100% Highly Qualified teachers in all core academic subjects.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.2.1 Increase the number of instructional facilitators, instructional coaches, teachers, administrators, support staff, and SCE coaches, campus based dyslexia providers, and counselors that receive Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol training (SIOP), Response to Intervention (RtI), At-Risk, and other differentiated approaches to instruction support and provide follow-up support with the emphasis on differentiated instruction specific to student needs.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Bilingual/ESL: $35,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of SIOP in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
3.2.2 Maintain and improve educational achievement for Schaeffer House students by providing a full time teacher to offer GED course training and CTE courses. The improvement of educational achievement for Schaeffer House students also includes the purchase of supplies and materials. The instructor provides instruction, guidance, and leadership to the GED students of Schaeffer House as they complete their GED diplomas.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Career and Technical Education Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 2.3.3 Teacher records, lesson plans, enrollment reports, Pre TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education), number of students completing GED Post TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education), number of students completing GED, promotion and retention reports Schaeffer House student grades, student rosters Schaeffer House student graduation rate, end of year student scores
3.2.3 Continue to carry out Instructional Support Team monthly professional development sessions for campuses.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Monthly Title II: $5,000 Walkthrough data, campus support visits, administrative debriefings Increase student performance in assessments in varied content areas Increase teacher and student performance through walkthroughs, site visits Student increase academically and with attendance
3.2.4 Support the integration of technology via equipment acquisition, attendance of local and/or state conferences, and professional development into the four core subjects of ELAR, Math, Science, and Social Studies.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $10,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increased access to technology for all teachers and the integration of technology into all areas of curriculum Usage in the classroom, data showing evidence of differentiated instruction and best practices during walkthroughs, increased student scores on common assessments, benchmarks, and released tests Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
Goal 3 SISD will recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified faculty, staff, and support personnel to improve student academic performance and to ensure that students graduate college and career ready.
Objective 3.3 During the 2015-2016 school year, the number of professional development opportunities offered to District employees will increase by 6% as compared to the 2014-2015 school year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.3.1 Attend state and/or national conferences such as, but not limited to, the Association of Compensatory Educators of Texas, Olweus Bullying Prevention, Homeless Education, the National Association of State Directors of Migrant Education (NASME), and Migrant Educators of Texas that address state and/or federal compliance issues.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $5,000; General Funds: $1,000; Title I, Part C: $4000 (Migrant Conference for TIAs); Title I, Part C: $3000 (NASME) Approved trip requests, conference agendas, conference programs, certificates of completion, turn-around trainings All deadlines for applications and reports to TEA are met on a consistent and continuous manner which equals to the District receiving state and federal funds to improve the basic programs. NCLB Consolidated Application and Compliance report submissions; acceptable compliance spot checks, improved awareness of state guidelines and requirements Enhanced monitoring of compliance issues both at the District and campus levels.
3.3.2 Provide training and on-going support to campus clerks to ensure that coding is accurate in Tyler Munis based on LPAC documentation for accountability, assessment and curriculum purposes.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Director, LPAC Coordinator, Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists, Campus Principals, Technology Services Monthly None needed Sign-in sheets, agendas, LPAC documentation Accurate data submissions to PEIMs for snapshot Verification reports Increase the clerk knowledge on how to navigate Tyler Munis error free
3.3.3 Provide training and support of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) to all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL, Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of ELPS in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
3.3.4 Provide training workshops to teachers and campus staff in the Latino Family Literacy Project to work with Latino parents and their children in building a regular reading routine and strong English-language skills.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL; School Improvement Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $60,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of ELPS in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
3.3.5 Provide training to a minimum of one administrator on each campus in National Incident Command Systems and National Incident Management Systems.
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Chief of Police Services; EOP Manager Spring Semester General funds Campus administrators will have certification Organization and preparedness of each campus administration during emergency drills. Administrators will be well versed in NIMS/ICS. Administrators will be prepared for multiple emergency scenarios.
3.3.6 Provide initial and follow-up trainings to all SISD school campuses on the Olweus Bullying Prevention coordinating Committees (BPCC) to include providing supplies, materials, refreshments and snacks. The trainings will be provided as needed to ensure each campus has a trained BPCC.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $5000 Sign-in sheets, P.O.s for materials, agendas Decrease in discipline referrals, higher attendance rate, Improved student performance Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Questionnaire, PEIMS data, mid-year decrease in bullying related referrals Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Questionnaire, PEIMS data, end-of-year decrease in bullying related referrals
3.3.7 Offer opportunities via CTE for teachers to attend staff development trainings offered locally and throughout the state of Texas.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 Funding, Carl Perkins Grant Trip requests Student achievement and certifications Trip requests Number of teachers attending training
3.3.8 Provide staff awareness trainings to district personnel to include classroom teachers on the issues surrounding homelessness.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $200 Sign-in sheets, agenda, conferences, professional development Evaluations, turn-around trainings Enhanced monitoring of report grades and benchmark assessments Increase in state assessment scores results by 5% in all core content areas
3.3.9 Provide opportunities for district personnel to become members of organizations / coalitions and attend statewide conferences that support the District's Homeless Education Program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly, 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $100; McKinney-Vento sub grant: $1,250 Conference information, teacher schedules, student rosters, and services provided Increased number of homeless students passing all areas of state assessment Agency contacts for services Increased numbers of students receiving support from El Paso area agencies that provide services for the homeless
3.3.10 Provide teacher training and support through
Super Scientist Academies/Science Blitz (STAAR Rotations) in an array of mediums, such as interactive workshops, classroom modeling, lesson planning and assessment samples.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $3,000 Program agendas and sign-in sheets Participant, surveys, evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, and lesson plans Unit assessments End of year student scores to include classroom grades and state assessments
3.3.11 Provide a district Trainer of Trainers (ToT) for New Science Textbook Adoption.
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School Improvement Officer, Academic Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $10,000 Sign-In Sheets, Agenda Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans Unit assessments End of year student scores to include classroom grades and state assessments
3.3.12 Attend state and/or national conferences such as National Science Teachers Association (NSTA), Science Teachers Association of Texas (STAT) and others that address Science content.
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School Improvement Officer, Academic Support; Instructional Officer-Science, Elementary; Instructional Officer-Science, Secondary Summer Intersession, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $10,000 Agenda, Conferences, Professional Development Evaluations, Turn-around trainings and provide agendas Improved science best practices Broadened support to campuses for science
3.3.13 Provide support and training for Social Studies teachers in an array of mediums, to include, but not limited to, interactive workshops, online activities, mentoring, classroom observations, and model classrooms.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks, Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $5,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts, evaluations, surveys Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
3.3.14 Facilitate an Intervention Convention to include all subject areas where intervention support to teachers will be provided, including but not limited to resource development, lesson planning, common lesson planning, data analysis for instructional focus, development of pre- and post-assessments, formative assessment, and evidence of impact.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $4,000 School participation, agendas, sign-in sheets Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
3.3.15 Facilitate the professional development in, development of and distribution of teacher-created materials in Social Studies, including, but not limited to the development of and copies of unit plans, pacing guides, Social Studies-based student handouts, electronic resources, common assessments, etc.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $5,000 School participation, agendas, sign-in sheets, teacher artifacts, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
3.3.16 Provide Social Studies Cadres for elementary Texas History and U.S. History in order for teachers to unpack the TEKS and gain a better understanding of the content, as well as lesson ideas, activities, and strategies.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $2,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
3.3.17 Provide professional development opportunities showing how Social Studies content can be integrated into Reading and Writing.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Every 9 weeks, Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $2,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
3.3.18 Attend state and/or national Social Studies and ELAR conferences, such as, but not limited to, Texas Council for the Social Studies and National Council for the Social Studies that address integrating Social Studies in the curriculum.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $3,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials Evaluations, turn around trainings with agendas and sign in sheets Enhanced monitoring of Social Studies implementation Broadened support to campuses through ELAR and Social Studies
3.3.19 Provide content-specific professional development connected to the Texas Student Expectations for Social Studies K-12.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $2,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies unit assessments / common assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, high school benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and exit level U.S. History E.O.C.
3.3.20 Provide targeted professional development on new Math instructional materials for grades K-8.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; SCEI Coaches Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $5,000 Attendance sheets, planning agendas, teacher attendance Increase teacher capacity and build content knowledge of the new TEKS and their specificity. Teachers will be able to choose appropriate lessons and assignments that are directly aligned to the standards Evaluation forms End of year evaluation forms
3.3.21 Provide professional development to support implementation, development and use of TI-Nspire calculators in the classroom
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math; SCEI Coaches Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $5,000 Attendance sheets, planning agendas, teacher attendance Increase teacher capacity and build content knowledge of the new TEKS and their specificity. Teachers will be able to choose lessons that are directly aligned to the standards Evaluation forms End of year evaluation forms
3.3.22 Offer monthly planning sessions for teachers in grades K-8 using new 2012 Math TEKS.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $2,000 Attendance sheets, planning agendas, teacher attendance Increase teacher capacity and build content knowledge of the new TEKS and their specificity. Teachers will be able to choose lessons that are directly aligned to the standards Evaluation forms End of year evaluation forms
3.3.23 Offer 4 professional development sessions through the year on best practices in Math instruction.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $3,000 Attendance sheets, planning agendas, teacher attendance Increase teacher capacity and build content knowledge of the new TEKS and their specificity. Teachers will be able to choose lessons that are directly aligned to the standards Evaluation forms End of year evaluation forms
3.3.24 Provide opportunities for Instructional leaders, campus and district, to attend state and national conferences in the content areas.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $2,000 Professional development offerings, lesson plans, district initiatives Increase instructional leader capacity and knowledge on cutting edge issues involving content, pedagogy and best practices. Evaluation forms End of year evaluation forms
3.3.25 Provide Parent Liaisons with professional development training to promote and increase parental involvement. Include costs for generating hard copies of the district parental involvement policies for distribution to campus parents.

Parent Liaison professional development will occur in July, November, and April.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $8,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, hard copies of policies, receipts Sign-in sheets, evidence of increased attendance Sign-in sheets End-of-year compliance reports for each campus
3.3.26 Instructional officers will offer a minimum of 2 professional development opportunities per month in ELAR.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR Monthly Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $7,000 Teacher rosters, lesson plans, agendas, sign-in sheets Improve report card grades Performance Indicators Informal observations Common Assessments Improve Istation levels Improve STAAR Passing/advanced levels
3.3.27 Provide professional development on the Close Reading strategy, Text Dependent Questioning, Genre Studies
(expository texts; poetry), and on Figure 19.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officer- Secondary ELAR Fall Intersession, 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $3,000 Close Reading binders; Genre study binders; student artifacts Fall and Spring Benchmark Scores; STAAR Scores Fall and Spring Benchmarks Scores STAAR Scores
3.3.28 Provide additional professional development on the use of the TEKS Resource System, highlighting the significance of Performance Indicators.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR Fall Intersession, 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $3,000 Student artifacts Fall and Spring Benchmark Scores; STAAR Scores Fall and Spring Benchmark Scores STAAR Scores
3.3.29 Notify district personnel of professional development opportunities via a variety of media, such as the Save-Our-Schools (SOS) Newsletter, in order to bolster professional growth and increase academic achievement.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Monthly Title II: $3,000 Copies of SOS newsletter and other notifications Increased attendance at professional development sessions Mid-year increase of teacher professional development attendance End-of-Year increase of both administrator and teacher professional development attendance.
3.3.30 Provide teachers with training on differentiated instruction, co-teaching, and strategies for the new PAS class.
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Director, Special Education Monthly None needed Sign-in sheets, purchase orders, Stetson Online training reports Training evaluations, walk through observations Implementation of strategies in 50% of classrooms visited when appropriate for co-teaching and PAS; 10% for DI Implementation of strategies in 75% of classrooms visited when appropriate for co-teaching and PAS; 25% for DI
3.3.31 Implement a training and monitoring system for campus administrators and teachers in the Continuum of Services instructional models (Co-Teaching, Support Facilitation, Specialized Support, External Support) to bolster the academic performance of Special Education students.
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Director, Special Education Weekly, Monthly General funds: $500/year Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, campus visit forms, purchase orders, monthly assessment meeting meetings Staffing Data, Scheduling data, Improvement in academic performance of Special Education students of teachers who have received training Increase in District benchmark and Released test scores Increase in the passing rate of Special Education students on state assessments
3.3.32 Provide extra-duty pay, travel funds for Special Education personnel for tutorials and professional development.
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Director, Special Education Weekly IDEA-B: $25,000 Extra duty pay sheets, sign-in sheets, agendas, state and national conference registrations, tutorials, professional development turn-around trainings Evaluations, increased student performance for special education students Benchmarks, Released State Assessments Final State Assessment Scores
3.3.33 Provide staff development to teachers on the use of Unique Learning System (ULS), Lexia Core 5, MVRC, and FLRT, to bolster the academic progress of special education students.
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Director, Special Education Monthly General Funds: $500 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, purchase orders, campus visit forms Classroom walkthroughs and observations, lesson plan documentation, user log-ins, improvement on state assessment Progress monitoring, data reports on progress and usage, Increase on state assessment scores Increased state assessment scores
3.3.34 Offer a minimum of thirty hours (30) of training to include Nature and Needs of GT Students, Identification and Assessment of GT Students, and Curriculum and Instruction for GT Students to all district teachers.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Personnel Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $3,000 GT training materials, GT district website, staff development website, training brochures, agendas, sign-in sheets GT training evaluations GT queries and reports End of year GT reports, SISD DIP Summative Evaluation
3.3.35 Offer an additional six hour (6) annual update training districtwide. Other training opportunities will be offered such as book studies and technology-based training as an alternative to attending scheduled six hour annual update in-services.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Personnel Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $2,000 GT training materials, GT district website, staff development website, training brochures, agendas, sign-in sheets GT training evaluations GT queries and reports End of year GT reports, SISD DIP Summative Evaluation
3.3.36 Offer AVID elective teachers, site team members, administrators, and counselors the opportunity to attend Summer Institute Training, Path Training, or Divisional Leadership Trainings.
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Chief Academic Officer; School Improvement Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel; Campus AVID Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester (Title I, Part A funds; Local funds; State Funds): $100,000; Title I, Part A: $72,000 (PATH Training); Title II: $30,000 (School Improvement Officer approved training added 2-11-16) AVID Training Materials, AVID on District Website, Staff Development Website, Training brochures, agendas, sign in sheets AVID training evaluations AVID queries and reports End of year AVID CSS reports, SISD DIP Summative Evaluation
3.3.37 Provide professional development in an array of mediums: interactive workshops, online activities (to include PDAS training and "Prioritizing Subpopulation Assignments" for campus administrators, counselors, curriculum specialists, and teachers), newsletters, mentoring, coaching, classroom observations, model lessons, etc.
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers; SCE Intervention Coaches Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $200,000 (Superintendent's Academy)/$10,000 (Kagan Training); Title II, Part A: $700,000 (salaries); Title II, Part A: $11,860 (PDAS training); Title II, Part A: $21,200 (Prioritizing Subpopulation Assignments); SCE: $18,000 (extra duty pay) Campus and district calendars, sign-in sheets, agendas Increased student performance, better placement of English Language Learners (ELL) and Special Education students. Observations of application of new knowledge and skills, improved classroom grades Improved benchmark test results, improved state assessment scores
Goal 3 SISD will recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified faculty, staff, and support personnel to improve student academic performance and to ensure that students graduate college and career ready.
Objective 3.4 During the 2015-2016 school year, the District will provide funding to purchase scientifically research-based programs, materials, and/or resources for professional development training in order to decrease the number of schools that did not meet system safeguard indicators by 5, as compared to the 2014-2015 school year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.4.1 Provide Dual Credit Scholarship for teachers interested in teaching Dual Credit CTE courses to increase the number of Dual Credit offerings through CTE.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC 22 Funding Number of Teachers enrolled in graduate courses = TRs Number of teachers qualified to teach dual credit Teachers enrolled Teachers completed
3.4.2 Instructional Support Team will provide laser-focused professional development sessions for Tier 3 schools.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $3,000 Sign in sheets, walkthrough data , campus visits, follow ups Decrease safeguards missed and increase in student performance in core areas Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed
3.4.3 Continue the use of Instructional Rounds to strengthen instructional best practices and to ensure a networking potential between campuses.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Sign in sheets, walkthrough data , campus visits, follow ups Decrease safeguards missed and increase in student performance in core areas Decrease safeguards missed and increase in student performance in core areas Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed
3.4.4 Ensure that Special Education administrative costs, including equipment, printing, postage, part-time pay, supplies, furniture, and various fees (to include publishing fees) are incurred to support staff in their responsibilities.
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Director, Special Education Weekly IDEA-B: $10,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Improved student performance Mid-year review of expenditures Final expenditure reports
3.4.5 Teachers will be provided training on the district dyslexia programs.
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Director, Special Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester General Funds: $15,000 Sign-in sheets, extra duty pay sheets, contracts Training evaluations, walkthrough observations Program implemented with fidelity based on checklist, cadre meetings, teacher-student conferences 90% of items on fidelity checklist have been observed
3.4.6 Provide funding for district personnel to attend the "National Train-the-Trainer Institute: Co-Teaching That Works" program in Boston, Massachusetts that will concentrate on the development of enhanced co-teaching models for Special Education students. This trainer-of-trainers staff development will improve pedagogy for Special Education students. (Response to PBMAS results).
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Director, State and Federal Programs; School Improvement Officer, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $30,000 Travel requests, turn-around trainings Improved scores for Special Educations students on grades and assessments 2% improvement in scores for students on classroom grades and classroom assessments 2% improvement in state assessment scores for Special Education students.
3.4.7 Provide Campus data analysis session for Read 180
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School Improvement Officer Spring Semester Title II Walkthroughs Increase in STAAR reading performance for MS/High Schools SRI/SPI STAAR
Goal 3 SISD will recruit and retain 100% Highly Qualified faculty, staff, and support personnel to improve student academic performance and to ensure that students graduate college and career ready.
Objective 3.5 During the 2015-2016 school year, the number of teachers certified in Bilingual Education, English as a Second Language, and/or Special Education will increase by at least 7% district wide.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.5.1 Offer reimbursement opportunities via Title II funds for teachers seeking Special Education, Bilingual Education, or English as a Second Language certifications.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $10,000 Teacher rosters, meeting agendas Improved academic performance of students in Special Education, Bilingual Education, and ESL Education Mid-year improvement in grades of targeted students Improved performance of targeted students on state assessments
3.5.2 Increase the number of instructional facilitators, instructional coaches, teachers, administrators, support staff, SCE coaches, campus based dyslexia providers, and counselors that receive Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol Training (SIOP), Response to Intervention (RtI), At-Risk, and other differentiated approaches to instructional support and provide follow up support, with emphasis on differentiated instruction specific to student needs.
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Director, Special Education; School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $3,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Higher student attendance rate, increased student performance Class walk-throughs, lesson planning Increased student performance based on increased scores on state assessments

Goal 4 SISD will build positive parent, business, and community partnerships to ensure the academic success of students by engaging in collaborative district and campus-level activities; by connecting regularly via numerous means of communication; and by providing regular access to current educational information.
Objective 4.1 During the 2015-2016 school year, the District will increase the number of collaborative educational involvement activities and events for parents and community members by 3% as compared to the 2014-2015 school year to promote teamwork and unity in the education of students.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
4.1.1 Utilize the Latino Family Literacy Project to work with Latino parents and their children in building a regular reading routing and strong English-language skills.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education, Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Campus funds Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of ELPS in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
4.1.2 Produce an interactive SISD-TV news program highlighting the district’s strategic directions (3-4 shows).
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Post the shows on the district’s YouTube channel and district website Track the number of hits on the district’s YouTube channel and district website Increased awareness of district projects as well as the strategic directions Increased awareness of district projects as well as the strategic directions
4.1.3 The district will implement a new mobile app to offer increased communication with Team SISD stakeholders, allow parents 24/7 access to their children’s information, such as grades, assignments, and attendance, and give students and parents another avenue to easily receive district and school news.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds App creation Number of app users, representing stakeholder use Increased parent and community awareness of SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD endeavors
4.1.4 Provide progressive presentations to students and parents on the importance of attendance and attendance-related issues.
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Chief of Police Services Monthly General funds Attendance Officer STAT Sheet / Sign in Sheets Minimize the number of attendance related situations, increase in district attendance rate. Officer presentations will educate parents and students of Texas Attendance laws. Educating parents and students will result in an increase in district attendance rates.
4.1.5 Provide informational meetings to Migrant Education Program (MEP) parents on how to access resources that are appropriate for timely, at-home, interventions for their children. Provide materials and resources to parents who speak little or no English to assist in eliminating the language barrier to communication between school and home in ensuring student academic success. Provide light snacks at evening meetings to ensure increased attendance. For presenters at MEP meetings, provide funding for contracted services.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $500.00; Title I, Part C: $8,000 (contracted services) Sign-in sheets, agendas, progress reports At-Risk Management System reports, progress reports, report cards, recruiter's daily log Presentation evaluations, parent surveys Presentation evaluations, parent surveys
4.1.6 Hold a minimum of two CTE sponsored meetings per program per year where students, parents, instructors and business and industry representatives discuss program outcomes and program improvement.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Meeting Facilitator; Teachers and Culinary Arts Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding Agendas, sign-in sheets Plan for program improvement Number of attendees Number of attendees
4.1.7 Provide funds to Private Nonprofit schools to support equitable parental involvement activities for parents of SISD Title I eligible students.
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Director, State and Federal Programs 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $300 Agendas, purchase orders Sign-in sheets Increase in number of parents attending meetings/trainings Improved student performance
4.1.8 Strategy has been discontinued, but the number has been reserved as a placeholder to maintain the integrity of the strategy numbering scheme throughout the plan. It will be phased out in the next version of the plan.
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- Weekly - - - - -
4.1.9 Facilitate and/or assist in a variety of social studies enrichment opportunities including, but not limited to, Social Studies nights, culture fairs, guest speakers, inventor of the month, and living museums.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title II: $4,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, evaluations, surveys evaluations, student scores, student artifacts, interest surveys Social Studies Unit Assessments/Common Assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, High School Benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and Exit Level U.S. History E.O.C.
4.1.10 Provide registration costs for parents to attend workshops and trainings.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Director, Special Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $500; Title I, Part C: $1000; Title III, LEP: $1,000; IDEA-B: $5500 Purchase orders, attendee rosters, event materials Increased parent and community attendance of particular events Mid-year tally of events and attendance End of year tally of events and attendance
4.1.11 Fund a Title I Parent Liaison at each SISD campus to build capacity. Responsibilities include facilitating and offering parent workshop opportunities a minimum of twice a month to bolster parent involvement in order to increase student academic performance.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Daily, Weekly, Monthly Title I, Part A: (1 FTE per campus) $16,000 Title I Parent Liaison employment documentation; workshop posters, flyers, and web notices Workshop agendas, sign-in sheets, and other evidence of parent participation Student, parent, and teacher surveys Workshop evaluations, parental involvement event documentation
4.1.12 Purchase and implement scientifically research-based programs, materials, books, and other resources in support of Parent Liaison activities meant to increase campus parental involvement.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $20,000 Purchase orders, Parent rosters, Parent workshop schedules Parent workshop agendas, sign-in sheets, Parent workshop products. Parent and teacher surveys, workshop evaluations Parent and teacher surveys, workshop evaluations
4.1.13 Offer SISD “Guiding Your Gifted” meetings to parents of GT identified students.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Personnel; Campus GT Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $1,000 Flyers, calendars, sign-in sheets Increased number of parents attending demonstrated on sign-in sheets Sign-in sheets, flyers, agendas, handouts, electronic mail GT district generated report
4.1.14 Offer AVID meetings for parents of students participating in AVID at campuses with AVID college readiness system.
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Chief Academic Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel; Campus AVID Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester (Local funds; Title I, Part A funds): $1,000 Flyers, calendars, sign-in sheets Increased number of parents attending demonstrated on sign-in sheets Sign-in sheets, flyers, agendas, handouts, electronic mail AVID Certification Self Study (CSS) report
4.1.15 Host a father/son conference and a mother/daughter conference in order to increase parental engagement.

Father/Son - Sept, 2015
Mother/Daughter - Jan, 2016
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $15,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas Improved student scores for participants Registration list for evidence of participation Evaluations, end of year total participation
4.1.16 Support and promote ELL parental involvement trainings, workshops, classes, and seminars through the use of technology, supplies and materials to increase ELL scores in the areas of Reading, Math, Science and Social Studies on state and federal assessments.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists; Campus LPAC Administrators; Campus Bilingual/ESL Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III, LEP Part A: $750 Purchase orders, sign-in sheets, meeting agendas, training materials Increase of parental attendance at campus level, improved performance of students meeting level II performance on STAAR, increase of students achieving AH on TELPAS Progress monitoring, 3/6/9 assessments, benchmark scores End of year LEP scores for: OLPT, TELPAS, STAAR, EOC will increase by 2% overall in all content areas
4.1.17 Facilitate on a monthly basis informational & educational workshops and presentations that promote awareness of child crisis and youth related issues that influence academics and social behavior. Conduct volunteer orientations and trainings at the campus level. Recognize and honor volunteers at an annual luncheon and present volunteer awards to outstanding individuals and parent groups from each campus for their hours of service. Update Volunteer Coordinator’s Manual to contain best practices. Develop training materials for Volunteer Coordinators to manage the campus volunteer program. Update guideline manuals for parent organization’s training (booster clubs, PTAs & PTOs). Bylaws and IRS training. Provide meals for workshops and Trainings.
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Assistant Superintendent, Administrative Services; Volunteer Program Coordinator Daily, Weekly, Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Flyers, e-mails, District calendar of events, and web notices Sign-in sheets, agendas, and scheduled programs End of year program evaluation, sign-in sheets, agendas, and scheduled programs Impact and quality of service provided by volunteers with emphasis on student achievement, behavior, and assistance given to students, school staff, or district. Number of campus volunteer orientations, and number of registered parent organizations
4.1.18 Develop and implement a multimedia campaign celebrating members of Team SISD. The campaign will foster unity and pride within the community and provide dynamic materials to promote the progress and success achieved in the district.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Produced segments highlighting SISD members. Number of hits on SISD YouTube posts. Increased parent and community awareness of SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD endeavors
Goal 4 SISD will build positive parent, business, and community partnerships to ensure the academic success of students by engaging in collaborative district and campus-level activities; by connecting regularly via numerous means of communication; and by providing regular access to current educational information.
Objective 4.2 For the 2015-2016 school year, the District and campuses will increase the number of notifications, sent via newsletters, email, etc. to parents, business, and community members by 4%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
4.2.1 Inform parents and community stakeholders of federally funded programs at an annual meeting.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Director, Special Education; School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000 Notification in West Texas County Courier, SISD Website, Publication, copy of power point presentation, agenda, minutes, sign-in sheets District is seen as “transparent” about the use of federal funds Better understanding by parents and community regarding federal funds’ expenditures at the District and campus level Parents and community stakeholders’ willingness to question and make recommendations about how federal funds should be expended
4.2.2 Send SISD e-News community newsletter to parents, business and community members.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Monthly General funds E-mail to all SISD stakeholders signed up to receive the e-newsletter Review feedback from community, requests to share information in newsletter Increased parent and community awareness on SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD endeavors
4.2.3 Send Facebook and Twitter messages about school or district events, initatives.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Weekly General funds Facebook and Twitter postings Review Facebook and Twitter comments from SISD community Increased parent and community awareness on SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD endeavors
4.2.4 Purchase and provide campuses with brochures and posters to communicate with parents and the community members regarding programs (Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, Migrant Education Program, HANDS Program, etc.) and how it is being implemented in the schools to help diminish bullying incidents and improve school climate. (previously mentioned in Strategy 1.3.1)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 1.3.1 Purchase orders, Actual brochures and posters, student survey results, attendance rates Measureable increase in the number of students who report feeling safe at school on surveys, increase in attendance rate 2% increase in the number of students who report feeling safe at school on surveys 3% increase in the number of students who report feeling save at school on surveys
4.2.5 Provide parents calendar of events, use district messenger, and emails to inform of workshops, conferences, and school meetings.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $8,000 Distribution of District Parental Involvement Policy, signature page by administrator Increased parental involvement Parent surveys, sign in, attendance Increase parental involvement, increase student achievement
4.2.6 Support attendance and activities of a Parent Advisory Committee/Coffee with the Director meeting. Funding is for refreshments and snacks.
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Director, Special Education Monthly IDEA-B: $200 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, emails to parents on mailing list, Purchase orders, Special Education website publication, esped news Increase in parental participation Parent evaluation and feedback after meetings, mid-year increase in parental involvement Parent evaluation and feedback after meetings; year-end parent survey results, overall increase in parent involvement by year-end
4.2.7 Notify parents of all GT students about scheduled meetings at the beginning of the year and in the Spring to invite them for the GT Showcase and campus showcases and meetings.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Coordinators; Campus GT Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT state funds: $1,000 Flyers, calendars, sign-in sheets Increased number of parents attending demonstrated on sign-in sheets Sign-in sheets, flyers, agendas, handouts, electronic mail GT district and campus reports
4.2.8 As required by the Texas Education Agency, provide School Report Cards (SRCs) to parents/guardians in printed or electronic format to inform them of the performance and characteristics of the district and its campuses for the previous year.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester Title I, Part A: $4500 Printed SRCs, online posting of SRCs, purchase order for printing costs. Increased awareness of school performance among parents and community members. Increase in attendance of parental involvement sessions regarding school performance. Positive session evaluation results from parents Positive session evaluation results from parents and increased parental involvement
4.2.9 Develop brochures and informational leaflets about the Volunteer Program. Post a list of volunteer trainings and workshop on the SISD Volunteer Webpage and send out notices via e-mail and notices to campuses. Provide volunteers and parent organizations a calendar of events. Provide online access to volunteer’s registration, volunteer guidelines and parent organization training manuals and PowerPoint training presentations.
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Assistant Superintendent, Administrative Services; Volunteer Program Coordinator Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Volunteer workshop schedules, volunteer coordinator’s rosters, parent volunteer rosters, and Purchase orders Number of webpage visit hits and number of volunteer registration forms submitted to the volunteer program and sign-in sheets Volunteer surveys and feedback from parents, campus volunteer coordinators, and parent organizations End of year program evaluation
Goal 4 SISD will build positive parent, business, and community partnerships to ensure the academic success of students by engaging in collaborative district and campus-level activities; by connecting regularly via numerous means of communication; and by providing regular access to current educational information.
Objective 4.3 By the end of the 2015-2016 school year, the District will increase, by 3 over the previous year, the number of partnership activities with businesses, higher education institutions, and other outside agencies to support student education.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
4.3.1 Maximize the Partners in Education Program to help promote district initiatives and to educate the community about the good things happening in Socorro ISD.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Every 9 weeks General funds Visibility in local establishments Evaluation cards at the end of school year Increased parent and community awareness of SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD events
4.3.2 Invite Realtors and professionals in the real estate industry to an annual meeting to update them on district demographics, school information, boundaries, facilities updates, and registration requirements.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Attendance of at least 15 to 25 participants Evaluation cards at end of meeting Increased parent and community awareness of SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD events
4.3.3 Conduct Annual Senior Seminar where seniors present projects to parents, instructors, and business and industry partners.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; CTE Facilitators; Campus Administrators; Teachers Spring Semester PIC22 funding Program Number of professionals in areas of presentation Number of judges 2015 Number of judges 2016
4.3.4 Increase the number of College and Career Readiness Enrichment opportunities offered by teachers to a minimum of two per year per program (Guest Speakers, College Visits, Career Days/Fairs, Science Fairs and Industry visits)
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Director, Career and Technical Education; Campus Administrators; Teachers Spring Semester, Fall Semester PIC22 funding Number of activities conducted Number of students participating Number of activities 2015 Increase in number of activities
4.3.5 Provide opportunities for district personnel to attend regular meetings of the Foster Care Education Coalition to ensure academic and community support for students in foster care.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly None needed Agendas and meeting materials Increased number of foster care students passing all areas of state assessment Agency contacts for services Increased numbers of students receiving support from El Paso area agencies that provide services for students in foster care
4.3.6 Implement the Annual James Butler Spring Games Event, the James Butler Celebration Day Events, and the annual Run/Walk for James Butler Scholarship Fund. Timeline pertains to monthly meetings for planning and funding pertains to refreshments, snacks, flyers, and participation medals.
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Director, Special Education Monthly, Spring Semester IDEA-B: $500 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, publications, purchase orders Attendance data, sign-in sheets, registrations Parent survey, attendance data Parent survey, attendance and participation data for each event
4.3.7 Develop a community engagement, giving back initiative to serve the greater SISD community.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Engagement costs and plans Visibility in local establishments Increased parent and community awareness of SISD projects Increased participation of parents and community members in SISD events
Goal 4 SISD will build positive parent, business, and community partnerships to ensure the academic success of students by engaging in collaborative district and campus-level activities; by connecting regularly via numerous means of communication; and by providing regular access to current educational information.
Objective 4.4 For the 2015-2016 school year, the District will increase the number of customer service training sessions by 2% to ensure a positive and welcoming school climate for parents and community members.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
4.4.1 Facilitate Ammerman training on conflict resolution for leadership team.
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Chief Communications Officer, Public Relations Spring Semester General funds Majority of district principals attending (sign-in sheets, agendas) Feedback/evaluation forms on the training Decrease in mid-year incidents Decrease in end-of-year incidents

Goal 5 SISD district leaders, campus leaders, faculty, and staff members will ensure that students receive a quality education by working collaboratively towards the fulfillment of educational goals at the federal, state, and district level.
Objective 5.1 For the 2015-2016 school year, 93% of all students in all subgroups will meet district, state, and federal accountability standards and measured by reports such as the Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
5.1.1 Implement the use of 4 master social workers and CIS coordinators at the various campuses to assist students to acquire resources to improve academic performance, increase self-esteem, and develop social skills.
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Chief Financial Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; Campus Administrators Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 1.5.1 Social worker’s and / or CIS Coordinator’s student conference logs / student documented cases Improved student academic achievement Improved mid-year academic performance Improved end-of-year academic performance including state assessment scores
5.1.2 Ensure the use of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) by all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III: $20,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of ELPS in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
5.1.3 Increase the number of instructional facilitators, instructional coaches, teachers, administrators, support staff, and SCE coaches, campus based dyslexia providers, and counselors that receive Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol training (SIOP), Response to Intervention (RtI), At-Risk, and other differentiated approaches to instruction support and provide follow-up support with the emphasis on differentiated instruction specific to student needs.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education, Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Bilingual/ESL: $35,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of SIOP in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
5.1.4 Provide funding to conduct meetings of the Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC), the district-level decision-making entity mandated by district policies BQA Legal and Local. At least 6 meetings per year are conducted to address areas the areas of planning, budgeting, curriculum, staffing patterns, staff development, and school organization.
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester General funds Agendas, sign-in sheets Improved communication between the district-level and campus-level decision-making committees (EPAC and SIT, respectively) Increased attendance/participation of EPAC members from campuses, increased awareness of issues affecting campuses Increased attendance/participation of EPAC members from campuses, improved employee results on climate survey
5.1.5 Keep abreast of compliance requirements through the purchase of federal and state publications and reference materials.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I Part A: $3500 Purchase orders Increase awareness of current compliance requirements Training and information sharing with district departments and campuses Sign-in sheets Performance Based Monitoring Analysis System
5.1.6 Implement the use of Plan4Learning and Title I Crate to create, monitor, and refine Socorro ISD's annual District Improvement Plan and Campus Improvement Plans to improve the academic performance of students. Services acquired include training for district personnel on the use of the tool(s).
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Director, State and Federal Programs Summer Intersession, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $12,200 Purchase order, online district and campus improvement plans Increase in the academic achievement of students, enhanced utilization of state and federal funding district-wide 2% overall increase in student grades and/or assessments 2% overall increase in student state assessment scores
Goal 5 SISD district leaders, campus leaders, faculty, and staff members will ensure that students receive a quality education by working collaboratively towards the fulfillment of educational goals at the federal, state, and district level.
Objective 5.2 During the 2015-2016 school year, SISD will ensure that 100% of teachers at all grade levels will provide students with meaningful and effective academic interventions to ensure their academic growth.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
5.2.1 Conduct more frequent visits at Schaeffer House to monitor and evaluate student progress. Also conduct more campus visits where Temporary Instructional Aides are assigned to work one-to-one with migrant students and evaluate student progress
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Walkthroughs recorded Improved student performance Temporary Instructional aides progress Monitoring Report, Report Cards, Student Progress Reports Temporary Instructional aides progress Monitoring Report, Report Cards, Student Progress Reports, STAAR Assessment Results
5.2.2 Conduct monthly walk-throughs at all campuses by district mentors to ensure Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is being implemented with fidelity at all campuses, while also ensuring teachers have access to Olweus classroom on-line lessons.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Olweus District Mentors Monthly None needed Observations recorded on Olweus Tracker by assigned mentors Decrease in discipline referrals, higher attendance rate, Improved student performance Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Questionnaire, PEIMS data, mid-year decrease in bullying related referrals Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Questionnaire, PEIMS data, end-of-year decrease in bullying related referrals, Olweus Tracker
5.2.3 Ensure access to K12 Anonymous Alerts for campus administrators and ensure the investigation and documentation of all incident reports received by the campus.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Weekly None needed Documentation of investigation conducted for all incident reports received on K12 Anonymous Alerts Decrease in discipline referrals, higher attendance rate, Improved student performance Decrease in bullying related referrals, increased number of students reporting feeling safe at school on Olweus Questionnaire Administrators will document and close all completed investigations on K12 Alerts
5.2.4 Ensure that Tier 2 and Tier 3 students are provided with supplemental, explicit and systematic small group mathematics instruction that is aimed at building Math proficiencies, using research-based interventions that specifically target students’ needs based on data. Student growth will be monitored.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Small group lesson plans, observations, ARMS documentation Increased student success, increased number of Tier 1 students Unit assessments, Performance Indicators, common assessments TCM EOY assessments, STAAR
5.2.5 Ensure that students are provided with models of proficient problem solving, verbalization of thought processes, guided practice, corrective feedback and frequent review.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Math Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Small group lesson plans, observations, ARMS documentation Increased student success, increased number of Tier 1 students Unit assessments, Performance Indicators, common assessments TCM EOY assessments, STAAR
5.2.6 Ensure the provision of Intervention Conventions by Instructional Officers prior to every intersession to assure targeted interventions in all content areas.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession None needed Teacher attendance reports, campus visits documenting evidence of strategies Increase in student participation during intersession, observed positive learning experiences with students during campus visits Students increase academically and with attendance Students increase academically and with attendance
5.2.7 Implement targeted intersession support sessions conducted by the Instructional Support Department.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $4,000 Increase state assessment student scores, unit assessments and decreased safeguards missed Increase in state assessments Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed
5.2.8 Ensure that students are provided with data-driven, research-based interventions that engage them in higher level thinking and are aligned to the TEKS.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Lesson plans, campus meeting agendas, campus walkthroughs Improve report card grades Performance Indicators Informal observations Common Assessments Improve Istation levels Improve STAAR Passing/advanced levels
5.2.9 Ensure that all students served through Special Education funds receive full program benefit and are making adequate progress.
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Director, Special Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, walkthrough documentation Students demonstrate progress in multiple areas Documentation and/or assessments demonstrate improve student standings mid-year Documentation and/or assessments demonstrate improve student standings mid-year
5.2.10 Provide scientifically-research based supplemental interventions specific to students with characteristics of dyslexia that meet the state’s criteria for a dyslexia program.
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Director, Special Education Weekly General Funds: $40,000/year Purchase orders, materials, bid list, online reports Online progress monitoring, increased scores on the state assessment Scholastic reading inventory, scholastic phonemic inventory, reading diagnostic survey Scholastic reading inventory, scholastic phonemic inventory, WADE testing, reading diagnostic survey, STAAR Reading scores
Goal 5 SISD district leaders, campus leaders, faculty, and staff members will ensure that students receive a quality education by working collaboratively towards the fulfillment of educational goals at the federal, state, and district level.
Objective 5.3 For the 2015-2016 school year, SISD campus leaders will increase, by 4%, the number of campus teachers provided with professional development support and resources to achieve professional growth and high student academic achievement rates.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
5.3.1 Ensure that district personnel are notified of professional development opportunities via a variety of media, such as the Save-Our-Schools (SOS) Newsletter, in order to bolster professional growth and increase academic achievement.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Refer to funding in Strategy 3.3.29 Copies of SOS newsletter and other notifications Increased attendance at professional development sessions Mid-year increase of teacher professional development attendance End-of-Year increase of both administrator and teacher professional development attendance.
5.3.2 Ensure the continuation of Instructional Rounds to strengthen instructional best practices and to ensure a networking potential between campuses.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed Sign in sheets, walkthrough data, campus visits, follow ups Decrease safeguards missed and increase in student performance in core areas Decrease safeguards missed and increase in student performance in core areas Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed
5.3.3 Carry out Tier 2 and Tier 3 campus support visits in order to provide essential planning resources and courses of action for campuses in need. Administrative debriefings are embedded as part of this strategy.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $2,000 Campus data collected Student and teacher performance increase Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed
5.3.4 Carry out general campus support visits in order to advise campus teams on academic improvement. Administrative debriefings are embedded as part of this strategy.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title II: $2,000 Campus data collected Student and teacher performance increase Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed Increase state assessment student scores, lessen safeguards missed
5.3.5 Ensure assistance to campuses for additional professional development in Gifted and Talented Education.
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Chief Academic Officer; District GT Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed GT training materials, GT district website, staff development website, training brochures, agendas, sign-in sheets GT training evaluations GT queries and reports End of year GT reports, SISD DIP Summative Evaluation
5.3.6 Ensure assistance to campuses for additional professional development in the AVID college readiness system.
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Chief Academic Officer; District Advanced Academics Personnel Spring Semester, Fall Semester None needed AVID training materials, AVID on district website, staff development website, training brochures, agendas, sign-in sheets AVID training evaluations AVID queries and reports AVID Certification Self Study report
Goal 5 SISD district leaders, campus leaders, faculty, and staff members will ensure that students receive a quality education by working collaboratively towards the fulfillment of educational goals at the federal, state, and district level.
Objective 5.4 During the 2015-2016 school year, Curriculum and Instruction personnel will increase the number of data feedback sessions for each campus by 2, to provide further support and resources.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
5.4.1 Provide professional development support to campuses specific to Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) at the campus, grade, and subject-area levels including but not limited to Student Expectation breakdown and understanding, pacing, unit planning, lesson planning, common lesson planning, application of strategies, application of resources, development of common assessments, instructional observation and support, data analysis, revision of planning, lesson study, and intervention development. Frequency of support will be as needed by campus.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-Social Studies Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $4,000; Title II: $4,000 School participation, agendas, sign-in sheets, teacher artifacts, student artifacts Evaluations, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans, student artifacts, surveys Social Studies Unit Assessments/Common Assessments, student artifacts, 8th grade benchmark, High School Benchmarks Increased scores in 8th grade Social Studies STAAR results, K-7 final report card grade, and Exit Level U.S. History E.O.C.
5.4.2 Plan feedback sessions after every benchmark or mock assessment. This is offered to all schools and is mandatory for Tier 3 schools.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers-ELAR Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $2,000 Lesson plans, campus meeting agendas & sign-in sheets Improve report card grades Progress monitoring Improve Istation levels Improve STAAR Passing/advanced levels
5.4.3 Carry out Lead4Ward and STAAR analysis sessions to bolster improved academic performance at campuses.
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School Improvement Officer, Instructional Support; Instructional Officers Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1,000; Title II: $2,000 Sign in sheets, agendas Fall and Spring benchmark scores; STAAR scores Fall and Spring benchmark scores STAAR scores
Goal 5 SISD district leaders, campus leaders, faculty, and staff members will ensure that students receive a quality education by working collaboratively towards the fulfillment of educational goals at the federal, state, and district level.
Objective 5.5 During the 2015-2016 school year, school personnel will actively engage parents in the education process to ensure the academic and behavioral success of students by increasing parent attendance at school meetings and events by 4% as compared to the 2014-2015 school year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
5.5.1 Ensure fidelity in the use of the Latino Family Literacy Project to work with Latino parents and their children in building a regular reading routing and strong English-language skills.
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Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Bilingual/ESL Instructional Specialists Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III, Part A LEP: $5000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials & resources, lesson plans Increase of use of ELPS in core content areas and lesson plans Benchmarks, report card grades Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects
5.5.2 Provide training to district personnel on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act Parental Rights and Awareness.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $500 Flyers, agendas Sign-in sheets Improved report card grades and benchmark scores Increase in state assessment scores results by 6% in all core content areas
5.5.3 Provide support through targeted training to parents of students experiencing homelessness that are part of the M-V TEXSHEP grant.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Homeless Liaison, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester TEXSHEP Grant: $3,900 Purchase orders for training materials Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials Increased parent participation Sign-in sheets, evaluations
5.5.4 Strategy has been discontinued, but the number has been reserved as a placeholder to maintain the integrity of the strategy numbering scheme throughout the plan. It will be phased out in the next version of the plan.
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- Weekly - - - - -
5.5.5 Provide transportation and travel costs for parents of student served by the Department of Special Education.
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Director, Special Education Daily Special Education: $500 Travel documentation, detailed travel requests Random survey of parents Mid-year increase of parents served Increase in positive comments on parent survey
5.5.6 Provide supplies and materials for parents of students served by the Department of Special Education.
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Director, Special Education Daily, Weekly Special Education: $2000 Purchase orders Parent surveys Mid-year increase in number of parents served Increase in positive comments on parent survey


2015-2016

EPAC Members

In accordance with the administrative procedures established under Education Code 11.251(b), the campus-level committee shall be involved in decisions in the areas of planning, budgeting, curriculum, staffing patterns, staff development, and school organization. Education code 11.253(e)
  Dr. Magdalena Aguilar - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Dulce Aleman - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Maria Belinda Arnold - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Julietta Arredondo - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Jackie Beltran - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Elena Burdan - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Sandra Burton - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Lorena Cartagena - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Lizette Castro - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Carlos Contreras - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Verna De La Cruz - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Jennifer De La Riva - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Ernesto Espinoza - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Jessica Ferando - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Stephen Fernandez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Dolores Annie Gibson - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Torita Hansby - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Ruth Harris - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Angelica Herrera - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Kimberly Holt - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Gabriela Iglesias - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Johanna Jauregui - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Herlinda Johnston - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Sherry Lewis - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Christine Llewellyn - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Cynthia Madrid-Reyes - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Mayte Marquez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Lorena Martinez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Luis Miranda - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Gerardo Morales - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Patricia Ochoa - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Martha Ortega - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Gina Panfile - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Vanessa Parra - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Elizabeth Ponce Lugo - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Dianna Rios - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Fernando Ruiz - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Sonia Schulte - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Frenda Serda-Gerardo - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Angelica Soto - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Olga Terrazas - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Steve Warren - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Deana White - EPAC Member          6/19/2019