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Year:

Socorro Independent School District
2013-2014

Vision
Improving Lives
Mission Statement
Socorro Independent School District exists to maximize our children's academic, artistic, athletic and social skills.
Board of Trustees
CYNTHIA ANN NAJERA, PRESIDENT
PAUL GUERRA, VICE-PRESIDENT
ANGELICA RODRIGUEZ, SECRETARY
ANTONIO "TONY" AYUB, TRUSTEE
GARY GANDARA, TRUSTEE
HECTOR F. GONZALEZ, TRUSTEE
MICHAEL ANTHONY NAJERA, TRUSTEE
Superintendent
DR. JOSE A ESPINOZA
Comprehensive Needs Assessment
INTRODUCTION

The Socorro Independent School District is located in the southeastern portion of El Paso County, Texas. It serves Socorro, Horizon City, and the eastern portion of the City of El Paso. The District covers 136 square miles of El Paso County. The District's northern boundary is the Texas/New Mexico line. Its southern boundary is the Rio Grande River. It is part of Texas Education Agency Region XIX.

Socorro I.S.D. is one of the fastest growing school districts in the state of Texas. The District has twenty (20) elementary schools, six (6) PK-8 schools, nine (9) middle schools, five (5) high schools, one (1) ninth grade academy, and two (2) specialty campuses, a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) campus, and a community education program. The Student Activities Complex includes an 11,000-seat stadium, and the adjacent Aquatic Center, also open throughout the year, has indoor and outdoor pools.

The Socorro Independent School District is proud to be recognized throughout the state of Texas as an innovative educational leader. With nearly 44,300 students, Socorro is one of the largest Year Round school districts in Texas. The district's calendar features two-week breaks in the fall and spring as well as a two-week break during December.

Contributing to student success, we are fortunate to have a strong and supportive community. As a District, we believe it is vital that we work together in partnership with parents, local businesses, institutions of higher education, and our corporate community. Working together, we can ensure the continued growth and success of our wonderful District.

The Socorro District Improvement Plan (DIP) is prepared in accordance with requirements of Chapter 11, Subchapter F, of the Texas Education Code, specifically 11.251 and 11.252. These requirements are also contained in SISD policies BQ (Legal) and BQA (Legal).

Each school district shall have a district improvement plan that is developed, evaluated, and revised annually, in accordance with district policy, by the Superintendent with the assistance of the district-level committee. The purpose of the district improvement plan is to guide district and campus staff in the improvement of student performance for all student groups in order to attain state standards in respect to academic excellence indicators.

The district is required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 to implement the following 10 Title I School wide components:
- Comprehensive Needs Assessment
- Reform Strategies
- Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers
- High Quality Professional Development
- Strategies to Attract Highly Qualified Teachers
- Strategies to Increase Parental Involvement
- Transition Pre-K / K
- Teachers Included in Decisions Regarding Assessments
- Effective and Timely Assistance to Students Experiencing Difficulty
- Coordination and Integration of Federal, State, and Local Services and Programs

In addition to the 10 components, the following items are addressed within the framework of the Socorro District Improvement Plan: a) long range goals; b) measurable performance objectives; c) strategies for improvement of student performance in support of objectives; d) staff responsible for accomplishing strategies; e) specific timelines for implementation of each strategy; f) state and federal resources used to implement strategies g) evidence of strategy implementation; h) evidence of strategy impact; i) formative; and j) summative evaluation criteria.

In developing the 2013-2014 DIP, the SISD Educator's Professional Advisory Council (EPAC), comprised of elected members representing all campuses, along with members from the community, parents, business and central office, analyzed information and met in committee to review district needs, propose performance objectives, and recommend approval.

In addition to meeting state and federal rules and regulations, the 2013-2014 DIP aligns directly with the Socorro ISD Policies established by the Board of Trustees. Accordingly, monitoring of the strategies included in the DIP is accomplished through ongoing monitoring of the district policies and performance indicators. Furthermore, goals from each of the campus improvement plans are aligned directly with the DIP. Law has established that the District Plan and campus plans be the primary record supporting expenditures attributed to the State Compensatory Education Program.

In its effort to prepare its students for the future, the Socorro Independent School District utilizes numerous research-based programs and activities. While maintaining fidelity to those that have proven successful, the district also investigates and implements many innovative programs at the very forefront of modern education in order to address the Board adopted district goals.


Goal I:
The Socorro Independent School District will improve student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that all students are prepared to graduate college and career ready.

Goal II:
The Socorro Independent School District will provide services and benefits to attract, retain, and guarantee growth opportunities to ensure a highly qualified staff.

Goal III:
The Socorro Independent School District will promote and support active parent and community engagement in the education process to improve student achievement.


CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION


Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language
The Bilingual/English as a Second Language Department strives to provide every English Language Learner (ELL) student equal access to the English curriculum and ensure all students succeed. The Bilingual/English as a Second Language Department provides instructional support in the implementation of the English Language Proficiency Standards and Sheltered Instruction in grades Pk-12. The department provides support in all content areas for teachers to better support lesson delivery for student success. Additionally, the department provides guidance to campus administrators and support staff in the areas of LPAC and TELPAS. Most importantly, the department strives to support teachers to provide equal access to the English curriculum and ensure that all students succeed. Along with other departments, collaboration is key to ensure all students are provided with instructional tools and resources to be successful. Professional development is provided to teachers based on needs and moreover, to enrich a classroom environment that will provide optimal learning for an ELL student. Teachers will learn new instructional strategies to meet the various needs of the ELL student.

Elementary Education
The Elementary Education Department provides curriculum and instruction support in the implementation of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in grades K-5 and the Pre-K Curriculum Guidelines. The department provides information and guidance in the following content and program areas: Early Childhood Education, Language Arts and Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Assessment Literacy, Texas Math Initiative, and the Texas Reading Initiative. Additionally, the department provides information to school administrators and teachers regarding professional development offerings and meeting the learning needs of students through 19 Texas Administrative Code (TAC) Chapter 74. In collaboration with the other departments within Instructional Services, the Elementary Education Department works to ensure academic success of all students in the Socorro Independent School District.

Special Education
The Special Education Department provides service and support to campuses and students so students receive a free and appropriate education in the least restrictive environment. In addition to instructional services, related services are also provided to students who have an identified need. The Special Education Department provides campuses and staff with support for the inclusion of special education students in grade level instructional programs and provides support to the assessment staff to implement appropriate evaluations. The department also provides opportunities for staff development so all personnel in the district will understand issues regarding students with disabilities. The department strives to recognize areas of special need for students and seeks to provide improved transitional supports as they prepare for adulthood. It offers services to parents of students with disabilities and support for District and Regional Special Olympics.

Staff Development
In the effort to maintain high standards for the children of Socorro ISD, the Department of Staff Development offers a variety of opportunities for teacher growth and learning. Teachers are able to choose from a variety of staff development opportunities through Socorro ISD and approved providers that positively affect student learning.

Secondary Education
The Secondary Education Department provides curriculum and instruction support in the implementation of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) in grades 6-12. The department provides information and guidance in the following content and program areas: Language Arts and Reading, Mathematics, Science, Social Studies, Assessment Literacy, Texas Math Initiative, and the Texas Reading Initiative. Additionally, the department provides information to school administrators and teachers regarding professional development offerings and meeting the learning needs of students through 19 TAC Chapter 74. In collaboration with the other departments within Instructional Services, the Secondary Education Department works to ensure academic success of all students in the Socorro Independent School District. The mission of the Secondary Education Department is to support student success through the delivery of an aligned, guaranteed curriculum for every secondary student in the Socorro Independent School District. One of its primary goals is to improve the quality of education for all students by providing leadership in the development and implementation of instructional programs, so strong and inviting, that every student will be prepared and motivated to successfully complete challenging course work and continue their education beyond high school graduation.

School Improvement and Leadership Development
The School Improvement and Leadership Development Office is charged with implementing curriculum alignment vertically and horizontally throughout the district to foster accelerated student achievement, instructional capacity building for teachers, and leadership capacity building for principals and assistant principals within the feeder pattern. It also assists principals in developing climates of excellence and effective engagement with parents and community and supports principal accountability for academic growth and attendance.

Its major responsibilities include: a) ensuring that each campus improves student performance and meets state and federal performance standards; b) ensuring improvement of the quality of instruction and teacher's ability to teach with high levels of engagement and rigor; c) ensuring that each campus within the feeder pattern has a healthy climate and culture; d) directing, supporting, and monitoring principals to mold them into effective instructional leaders through coaching and professional development.

It also seeks to lead and support principals to ensure that the district's instructional and curricular programs, assessments, and pedagogical approaches are fully and appropriately implemented in all assigned campuses. It moves to organize and support professional learning communities for principals, as well as participate directly in such learning; professional learning communities are focused on improving teaching and learning. Part of its purpose is to supervise and evaluate the performance of principals in assigned feeder pattern; meet regularly with principals to collaboratively develop professional learning experiences and plans for improvement and ensure and support assigned campuses to develop and implement campus improvement plans designed to maintain continuous progress in student achievement and meet the targeted district goals set forth in the District Improvement Plan.

The School Improvement and Leadership Development Office also conducts regular campus visits that include conferring with principals, reviewing campus improvement plans and assessing student achievement progress. It uses student and campus data to develop and provide professional development for administrators and teachers. It also meets regularly with the Superintendent of Schools, assistant superintendent, and chief of schools and other designated central office staff to discuss campus progress, review data, and identify professional development budgetary supports and resources needed to assist campus staff to improve teaching and learning. It seeks to ensure assigned campuses comply with TEA, state, federal, and school board policies and laws.

The office develops procedures to address the following: attendance for students and teachers, dropout rates, graduation rates, college readiness, grade placement, and student success initiatives. It also develops procedures to ensure an increase in the number of students enrolled in honors and Advanced Placement classes. It seeks to ensure parent and community involvement on assigned campuses; ensure that principals understand and implement district policies and procedures for maintaining safe and secure environments or students; establish a collaborative relationship with all departments and divisions to ensure support of local campus academic, fiscal, training and facility needs; and finally to direct the development and maintenance of such records and reports as are necessary to keep the Superintendent of Schools, Board of Trustees and other executive staff informed of the district’s progress and future plans.

State and Federal Programs
The Department of State and Federal Programs exists for the purpose of meeting the requirements under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 and State Compensatory Education. The primary function of NCLB is to close the achievement gap between groups of students by (1) requiring greater accountability - for student performance; (2) focusing on what works - scientifically-based research, high quality teachers and paraprofessional qualifications; and (3) empowering parents – capacity building of schools and parents. The goal of the State Compensatory Education (SCE) Program is to provide a challenging and meaningful instructional program to close the achievement gap between children at risk of dropping out of school and their peers. To meet this goal, the Socorro Independent School District uses student performance data to design and implement appropriate compensatory, intensive, or accelerated instructional services that enable them to be performing at grade level at the conclusion of the school year.

In addition to implementing positions, programs, strategies, and/or activities that are supplemental to the basic instructional program funded throughs SCE dollars, the department examines data to improve academic performance through direct instructional services to students at risk of dropping out of school.

To ensure at-risk students are receiving a meaningful and effective program, SISD funds supplemental positions such as an instructional specialist, curriculum coaches, reading and lab teachers, instructional aides, and social workers. SCE funded personnel participate in professional development that are both related and beneficial to the state compensatory education program. Professional development is not only key but essential for the delivery of instructional services for at-risk students.

Additionally, the District evaluates and documents the effectiveness of the SCE program and determines which funded strategies are successful at raising academic standards. If the programs and/or services that are provided to reduce any disparity in academic performance are unsuccessful, the SCE resources are redirected.

Due to increased accountability, systems are in place to document the various SCE supplemental programs and or services that are undertaken by the district. The department maintains documents such as improvement plans, signed job descriptions, purchase orders, FTE lists, personnel action forms, time sheets, transportation logs, time and effort logs, lesson plans, and at risk student rosters to justify the use of SCE funding. For Goal 2, which addresses professional development, auditable documents include sign-in sheets, agendas, and evaluations.

21st Century Learning
The mission of the Department of 21st Century Learning is to support and encourage 21st Century Learning Skills and Environments that will provide all students in the Socorro Independent School District an opportunity to graduate college and career ready. Its various programs allow students to strive for maximum academic and personal growth before embarking upon paths towards the future.

GEAR UP-SOAR
The GEAR UP-SOAR program is a project that SISD has implemented in a partnership with UTEP, designed to increase the number of students who are academically prepared to enter and succeed in postsecondary education. The program focuses on strengthening the academic, technological and critical thinking skills that will be required for students to be college ready for the 21st century workforce. The program embraces the idea that in order for schools to provide a quality education, families and communities must be involved as purposeful partners in the education process.

At SISD, the GEAR UP-SOAR program started supporting seventh graders during the 11-12 school year. It will continue to support these students through high school graduation and in their first year of college. SOAR stands for Solutions for Optimal Academic Readiness and GEAR UP stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs. Students in the Socorro Independent School District have been receiving encouragement, support and academic preparation from the UTEP-SISD SOAR GEAR UP Project to ensure they will be ready for college and the workforce when they graduate from high school.

Advanced Academics
The purpose of Advanced Academics is to offer classes and differentiated programs for middle and high school students who may not be identified as gifted but require a rigorous curriculum. The Department offers a variety of advanced courses touching on all content areas at SISD high schools.

Career and Technical Education
Career and Technical Education strives to provide opportunities for students to participate in advanced Programs of Study to promote leadership, skills development and a seamless transition to post secondary education and/or work. Its goals are to provide opportunities for all students through a rigorous Career & Technical Education program, to provide a quality academic counseling and career guidance program for all students, and to provide sustainable partnerships with business and industry for current and emerging occupations. Career and Technical Education is a vital component of the high school curriculum. For many students, it represents as much as a third of their high school experience. It is a critical component in meeting the needs of students in academic achievement, career exploration, career preparation, and leadership development. Successful transition to postsecondary education, work, and/or the military is one of the goals of SISD's educational system.

Gifted and Talented
The SISD Gifted and Talented program directs an educational program that identifies, nurtures, and challenges the abilities of gifted students to a maximum capacity, thereby expanding their potential in order for identified students to realize areas of their contribution to self and society. The ultimate goal of the gifted and talented program at SISD is to develop within a student the desire for excellence and self-directed learning, thinking, research and communication and a sense of individual responsibility to the school community and the community at large.

Guidance and Counseling
The mission of the Socorro ISD school counseling program is to provide a comprehensive developmental guidance and counseling program that will maximize the academic, personal-social, and career competencies of all students so that they may realize personal postsecondary goals. The department's fundamental beliefs are that all students are important, have the right to participate in the school counseling program, and deserve the opportunity to achieve to their fullest potential. It also believes that students' ethnic, cultural, sexual differences, and special needs must be considered in planning and implementing the school counseling program and that all students shall have access to a full-time, certified, master's degree level school counselor.


SISD SUPPORT STRUCTURES

Human Resources
The Human Resources Department supports the District's goals and objectives by providing quality and timely service to all stakeholders assuring respect and confidentiality. The Department actively assists administrators in recruiting, hiring, and retaining the necessary highly-qualified personnel for their campuses and/or departments; assists district administrators in implementing district policy and procedures through timely training; assists in the development of employees' potential through educational opportunities provided by local and Title II funds; and assures a safe workplace that is free of any form of harassment or discrimination.

Financial Services
The Department of Financial Services is committed to helping provide the finest education to all students through its support efforts. Financial Services consists of the Payroll, Purchasing, Information Services, Budget & Business Services departments. Its goals are to provide training and guidance to all departments and campuses, assist all campuses and departments in following all the necessary state federal and local regulations, and serve the district in all aspects of education as needed.

Police Services
The Department of Police Services works toward a common district goal of developing students who excel academically, who reason and solve problems rationally, and act responsibly by displaying good character and citizenship. It is comprised of 28 sworn Peace Officers, 10 Attendance Officers, over 50 Security Officers, a Dispatch section and a support staff. The officers are licensed Peace Officers of the State of Texas, they have full arrest powers and all rights similar to municipal and county police officers. Additionally, the department has an Investigations Unit, a K-9 Unit and a Community Outreach Program. The officers who are designated as School Resource Officers (SRO's) are assigned to the high schools and middle schools. Our officers specialize in establishing a one-on-one rapport with students, parents, and staff to ensure that they have a positive experience with law enforcement.

Administrative Services
The Department of Administrative Services strives to provide a safe and healthy environment for all students, staff, and community members in a professional and friendly manner. SISD, through this department, has implemented the School Choice Option (Title IX, Sec. 9532). The School Choice Option states that the district, by receiving money under NCLB, must implement a policy for the following:

A student attending a persistently dangerous public elementary school or secondary school (as determined by the Texas Education Agency or a student who becomes the victim of a violent criminal offense while in or on the grounds of a public elementary or secondary school that the student attends, is offered and allowed to attend a safe public elementary or secondary school within the district, including a public charter school.

The Department of Administrative Services works with the Department of Police Services (and other district entities) to respond to student, parent, community, and campus concerns in this regard.

Technology Services
Socorro Independent School District has a robust Technology Infrastructure that meets the demands of students, staff and administrative technological challenges. The Districts Technological Systems and tools are successfully supported, managed, secured and reliable through our seven divisions under the Department of Technology Services: Systems Administration, Database Administration, Technical Services, Infrastructure and Security, Erate and Network Communications. Department of Technology Services is committed to providing equal access to technology for all students and the integration of technology into all areas of curriculum.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) to System Safeguards Shift
Adequate Yearly progress (AYP) was a standard that was required by the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 to determine which school districts and schools were making adequate academic progress, and which schools would be identified as needing improvement, corrective action, or restructuring because they were not making the required progress. All states that accepted Title I funding (currently every state) established AYP goals for every public school district and school in the state. Every state was required to assess and report on the AYP performance of every school in the state, even for those schools and school districts that did not qualify as Title I entities. (www.ncpie.org)

SISD failed to meet Adequate Yearly Progress for two consecutive years in the following areas:

District students identified as English Language Learners (ELL) scored 79% on the STAAR Reading test, short of the 87% required to meet AYP. ELL students also scored 81% on the STAAR Math test, short of the 83% required to meet AYP. District Special Education students scored 70% on the STAAR Reading test, short of the 87% required to meet AYP. Special Education students also scored 66% on the STAAR Math test, short of the 83% required to meet AYP. District students identified as African-American scored 78% on the STAAR Math test, short of the 83% required to meet AYP.

In reviewing our adequate yearly progress for students that are LEP or in their first or second year of monitoring, data is aggregated as one of the seven student groups for accountability. Although our overall district scores for ELL students were still short of the state goals, data shows that there were increases in at least four content areas. In grades 3-8 STAAR results of students served, first year monitored and second year monitored, our reading scores increased by 5%, math 5%, science 7%, social studies 8% and a decrease of 3% points in writing. SISD also tested fewer students this school year due to less number of ELL students. High school scores are still not final.

As a result of the scores listed above, SISD must now meet the requirements of the School Improvement Program (SIP), which calls for the District to meet specific sanctions in its efforts to fulfill the requirements of System Safeguards. The District will implement new objectives and strategies (for each of its 3 goals) specifically created for this purpose. Seven Critical Success Factors (CSF), key milestones that are components of successful schools, have been provided by the Texas Education Agency to be included in the plan.

These Critical Success Factors are: Academic Performance, Use of Quality Data to Drive Instruction, Leadership Effectiveness, Increased Learning Time, Family and Community Engagement, School Climate, and Teacher Quality.

Within the framework of the district plan, a labeling system has been employed to identify which Critical Success Factors that each Safeguards specific objective and strategy addresses. Quite simply, the system works as follows: (AP) for Academic Performance, (QD) for the Use of Quality Data to Drive Instruction, (LE) for Leadership Effectiveness, (ILT) for Increased Learning Time, (FCE) for Family and Community Engagement, (SC) for School Climate, and (TQ) for Teacher Quality. At the end of each Safeguards specific objective and strategy, one of the abbreviations will be included.

Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS)
The Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS) is a federal statute that guides the Texas Education Agency (TEA) in its monitoring of students served in programs that are supported by state and federal funds. Programs included are: Special Education, Bilingual Education, Career & Technical Education, and No Child Left Behind. The essential nature of PBMAS is the use of an indicator system to ensure that these students are being properly served and that the funding is being utilized effectively. Data examined under PBMAS comes from a variety of sources, which includes: Student assessment data including STAAR data obtained from data sets produced by the Student Assessment Division of TEA, Dropout & graduation data from Division of Accountability Research, Academic Excellence Indicator System (AEIS), AYP & Graduation data from Performance Reporting Division, and PEIMS Data from PEIMS Division.

Socorro ISD has completed the 2012-2013 Performance-Based Monitoring (PBM) intervention requirements for the bilingual education/English as a second language and career and technical education programs. Intervention activities tailored to each type and/or stage of intervention are described and reflect an emphasis on data integrity, data analysis, improved program effectiveness, and increased student performance. Local needs have been identified and improvement planning activities have been implemented to address identified needs.

Of particular concern with regards to PBMAS is that for Socorro ISD Intervention Types, Career and Technical Education (CTE) is at Stage 4 (Escalated Oversight) and Bilingual Education/ESL is at Stage 2 (Baseline). There is a definite need to ensure the implementation and monitoring of strategies that will move towards rectifying the current Intervention levels of CTE and Bilingual Education/ESL.

Adequate Yearly Progress Information
Additions/revisions to the SISD 2012-2013 CNA have been maintained in the 2013-2014 CNA since measures implemented to meet adequate yearly progress are still in place. The information is as follows:

For Goal 1, it was determined that specific objectives for particular student populations should be adopted in order for the District to meet AYP standards by 2014. Since the District previously failed to meet AYP requirements for ELL students, Special Education students, and African American students, the percentages needed to meet the new Safeguards percentages for each population were discussed. Percentages pertaining to standard proficiency targets were reviewed.

There is a continued need to clarify data from each district department for proper analysis to ensure support for students with language barriers, and that responsibility for these students is to be shared by all teachers at the secondary level. It was stressed that the District should maximize its use of technology resources and provide these resources equitably across departments and campuses. There is a need to ensure implementation of vertical alignment, Kagan strategies, and Inclusion. With regard to the military, the District should analyze and respond to the mobility of students of military families. Different types of military parents should be considered, such as active duty, reserves, etc. Counseling and mentoring for military students who need support adjusting to Texas standards should also be provided.

With regards to Goal 2, there is a continued need to coordinate professional development on Saturdays, to provide professional development for instructional aides via various methods (including webinars), and to train all teachers on Differentiated Learning. There is also a need to provide training for regular education and special education teachers to enhance collaboration between inclusion teachers and their regular education counterparts. There is a need to train teachers on the subject of cultural sensitivity and issues faced by transitioning families such as military families and/or displaced families.

For Goal 3, a continued need is the importance of implementing extracurricular activities at greater levels to involve more parents. Additional training for parents on how to help with homework at both the elementary and secondary levels is also needed.

The SISD Climate Survey
During the 2012-2013 school year, SISD Superintendent Dr. José Espinoza spearheaded the implementation of the SISD Climate Survey, specifically created to gather information about the perceptions of District stakeholders. The purpose of the Climate Survey is to provide direction for the District in raising student academic achievement. Quite simply, its results have provided a starting point for the District to respond to the needs of its students, parents, and employees. While Dr. Espinoza, the Department of Technology Services, and the Department of Public Relations comprehensively presented the Climate Survey and its results in a formal release, the results pages have been extracted and are displayed below. SISD campuses may post their own survey results within their own online campus improvement plans.






STAAR and EOC Test Results
Before proceeding to discuss the strengths and needs of student performance, professional development, and parent and community engagement, provided below are 3rd-8th grade Spring 2013 STAAR test results along with 2012 results for comparison. Immediately following the 3rd-8th grade STAAR results are results for 2013 STAAR EOC tests. SISD campuses analyze their data to compare their results to their peer schools, to measure their own growth, and to understand what is necessary for student academic performance to increase.













GOAL 1
STUDENT FINDINGS AND STRENGTHS

Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) Reflection
EPAC members pointed out a number of key strengths demonstrated by the District that should be continued for 2013-2014. First and foremost, SISD recognizes the need of 21st Century learners to have access to relevant, up-to-date, and effective technology tools in order to become contributors to the global community. As such, the District provides its employees with multiple digital tools to address curricular, administrative, and professional development needs in order to provide an effective learning environment for the students. Many of these tools are now offered in a web-based format to allow for additional accessibility and flexibility in delivering the content the end-user is requiring. An example of these tools is the Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) online content which provides a myriad of resources, videos, and content to assist professionals working with SISD's ELL population in their transition to the English language. Additionally, the same strategies can be used to provide support for all struggling readers, regardless of their native language.

The members of EPAC observed that SISD offers training in areas such as SIOP to teachers, provides staff development in different content areas, and offers support via TIAs. Campuses decide how to use technology and technology tools in the classrooms. The District offered numerous Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) training opportunities throughout the school year, but they sometimes interfered with teacher time in the classroom. During the January staff development, teachers in the middle school area were broken up by content in order to provide content specific training such as the TI-NSPIRE calculators. TIAs offer much support to campuses and more specifically to students and teachers when offering one-on-one and small group instruction as well as teacher support via lessons. The District is moving toward data driven decisions, which aid teachers and administrators in making decisions and identifying areas of strengths and needs. Campuses were given the freedom to plan their intersession and after school tutoring programs with the help of administrators and State Compensatory Education Intervention (SCEI) Coaches. The District also provided summer school opportunities for schools to target students needing additional academic support. The District continues to encourage the use of technology tools such as iPads and Nooks to enrich classroom lessons.

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Advanced Academics - AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)
The strengths of the AVID program are the structures that are provided to the students that are selected for participation in the program. Students are selected based on set criteria from AVID. These include students that are generally not considered high achieving, yet have the ability to succeed, are often from low-income families, and more likely to be first generation college going students. Campuses that implemented the AVID program provided the rigorous curriculum and many or all of the strategies school-wide so that the campus culture centered on a college going environment. Another strength of the AVID program was that students were afforded the opportunity to attend colleges and/or universities outside of the El Paso area. Students were also provided with the research tools to research about particular career paths and the institutions of higher learning that support such career paths. Mentors were assigned to assist AVID students during the AVID elective; the mentors rely on metacognition and question development among peers as a means of developing a stronger academic language among the AVID students.

At-Risk Student Support

State Compensatory Education (SCE) is defined in law as programs and/or services designed to supplement the regular education program for students identified as at-risk of dropping out of school (TEC 29.081).
Its purpose is to increase the academic achievement and reduce the drop out rate of these identified students, while its goal is to provide direct instruction to close the achievement gap between children at risk of dropping out of school and their peers.

A veritable strength of SISD is the way that these students who are at risk of dropping out of school are offered support. Good teaching includes proven, research-based methods by which teachers respond to students who are experiencing difficulty, academically or otherwise. These methods, referred to as interventions, are not only vital to supporting At-Risk students, but are also to be documented as per state guidelines. Using an internally developed database known as the At-Risk Management System (ARMS), SISD has made it possible for teachers to document the different methods by which they support their At-Risk students. Additionally ARMS gives teachers the ability to see what previous teachers have already tried in support of these same students. Responding to the needs of struggling students is already something that teachers do, and ARMS simply gives them a way to see what their colleagues have already tried and to document what they have tried themselves. The strength of the system, like all other systems, is entirely dependent upon users utilizing it with diligence.

At each of its campuses, SISD has implemented the use of State Compensatory Intervention (SCEI) Coaches to serve At-Risk students with direct intervention and to provide support to teachers in the form of lesson modeling, training, and intervention delivery. Additionally, Class Size Reduction (CSR) teachers are in place at elementary campuses to alleviate class loads in 5th grade and to implement a more favorable student-teacher ratio. At secondary campuses, CSR teachers are used to provide additional support to students in the content area(s) that each campus has defined as priority. Data is used to deliver proper direct instruction to At-Risk students most in need.

Students receive mentoring through a program called Connect with Kids, which is an online video database with lesson support that teachers use to deliver character development content. This program strives to improve school climate and offers students the opportunity to share any difficulties they may be experiencing that will undoubtedly interfere with their academic performance.

At SISD campuses, teachers work with an assigned At-Risk Instructional Aide who works with small groups and who can assist struggling students on a one-to-one basis. Evidence to support the feasibility of this includes standardized test scores and classroom assessments. Some campuses utilize Communities in Schools (CIS) coordinators who assist struggling students via community services. Evidence of the positive impact of CIS workers includes standardized test scores and classroom assessments. The District also has an alternative high school or school of choice (Options High School) with capacity to serve 150-200 At-Risk and recovered dropout students. Admission to Options High School is based on recommendations from counselors at the main district high schools and on interviews with students and their families.

Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language
The Bilingual/ESL Department is able to fund a minimum of one TIA (temporary instructional aide) with Title III funds to support small group instruction and focused intervention for ELL students. TIAs are beneficial in supporting recent immigrants with the transition into learning English in all content areas. TIAs provide individualized support with learning the new content and language through the use of various resources and tools. A language power kit will be used to maximize learning that is aligned to the TEKS and ELPS to better support student learning.

Students also have access to technology such as ipads, nooks and laptops that will allow them to enrich their technology learning specifically to assist them while taking STAAR L assessments and TELPAS online reading activities.

IStation is also available to ELL students to support their strengths and weaknesses in the areas of reading for grades K-3. STEMscopes is another tool that ELL students have access to that provides numerous hands-on inquiry activities, intervention and accelerated materials in the area of science.

A K-3 leveled bookroom in Spanish is available at all elementary schools to assist students’ transition from Spanish to English while learning new content in English. These books are lexiled to the students reading ability.

The department also provides guidance to campus LPAC committees to ensure that decisions to support student learning are made in the best interest of the student. The department provides training to campus administrators so monitoring and decision making for ELL students is in compliance with state and federal requirements.

Career and Technical Education
The Department of Career and Technical Education has supported Rigor, Relevance and Relationships by: a) using industry recognized curriculum leading to industry recognized certifications. (listing of the Curriculum and Certifications); b) providing many opportunities for students to obtain Articulated and Dual Credit through CTE courses. (Listing of the Articulated and Dual Credited courses and the number of students who qualify); c) providing opportunities for students to shadow and intern at local business and industries. (Listing of Partners); d) ensuring that while in eighth grade, all students develop a 4-6 year plan for the courses that they will take in high school and the first two years in college. (Plans are housed on the CCRP website); and e) providing students opportunities to participate in Career and Technical Student Organizations that promotes the development of leadership skills.

Communities in Schools (CIS)
Communities in Schools is a program that provides support services to at-risk students and their families in order prevent student dropout and to help students follow positive paths towards successful futures. SISD implements the use of CIS coordinators at campuses to help at-risk students overcome obstacles that they sometimes encounter, not only in school, but in other areas of life. On the Communities in Schools of El Paso website, the program states: We implement the following six components to all of our direct caseload students:
1. Educational Enhancement
2. Supportive Guidance
3. Enrichment
4. Health and Human Services
5. Parental Involvement
6.Career Awareness/Employment

The services that Socorro ISD campuses offer to at-risk students have been greatly enhanced by those offered by CIS personnel. The cooperative efforts of SISD and CIS to support these students illustrate how school-community partnerships are so crucial.

Elementary Education
CSCOPE is utilized by the district to organize and execute curriculum. CSCOPE is a comprehensive, customizable, user-friendly curriculum management system built on the most current research-based practices in the field. CSCOPE is created by the The Texas Education Service Center Curriculum Collaborative (TESCCC) which includes a team of nineteen of the twenty Education Service Centers that represents all areas of the state of Texas. The collaborative's goal is to provide a quality curriculum support system to Texas K-12 schools. TESCCC has developed CSCOPE, a comprehensive, customized, user-friendly curriculum support system. In addition to the curriculum, CSCOPE encompasses resources for the implementation, monitors the curriculum and establishes an accountability process to ensure a quality implementation. The curriculum component of CSCOPE is based on best practice models from top researchers. At the heart of the CSCOPE process is a guaranteed & viable curriculum. Content area experts ensure quality through a process of continual review. The key components of the CSCOPE curriculum are:
- A K-12 systemic model in the four core content areas
- Common language, structure, and process for curriculum delivery
- Innovative Technology
- Aligned written, taught, and tested curriculum
- Clarified and specified TEKS/STAAR expectations assembled in a vertical alignment format
- Customizable instructional plans that allow district resources to be integrated into the system

Scholastic Leveled Bookrooms are all-in-one packages utilized by the District that provide everything a teacher needs to quickly help students learn essential vocabulary, enhance comprehension skills and analyze challenging sentence structure. Each bookroom comes with the exclusive Leveled Bookroom Teacher Resource Kit that delivers research-based strategies, best practices and the following:
- Teaching Cards for every title
- Guided Reading Implementation DVD
- Implementation Guide featuring:
- Running records
- Behavioral observation assessments
- Reproducible reading logs
- Reproducible genre bookmarks in English and Spanish

The K-6 Leveled Bookroom (English) and K-3 Leveled Bookroom (Spanish) provide leveled reading material for elementary and K-8 campuses. Each campus owns the titles outright which allows for unlimited usage of the leveled readers for every student and teacher within the campus.

iStation is a computer-based system that is utilized as the District’s early reading assessment for students in grades K-3. A beginning, middle and end-of-year assessment is given to students to determine an approximate reading level as well as the strengths and areas of need for students. The reports generated are then used to determine specific interventions that the students will need to accelerate their learning. In addition to this, the system provides intervention lessons on the computer that is geared to the students’ individual needs. Since technology can be a powerful bridge to higher reading achievement by engaging students in learning that is relevant and meaningful, iStation Reading allows educators to better meet the needs of students with diverse abilities by means of differentiated instruction and automated assessments. iStation offers research-based effective reading instruction which integrates subject-area content with strategic reading skills. The five key reading areas (phonics, Fluency, Vocabulary, Comprehension, Phonemic Awareness) are threaded carefully throughout with explicit, direct, and systematic instruction. ISIP, iStations Indicators of Progress, is an Internet delivered computer adaptive testing (CAT) system that administers student-friendly, short tests through the Internet to determine each student's overall reading ability and then adapts difficulty of questions based on performance.
iStation Highlights:
- Differentiates and delivers individualized instruction with Benchmark and Continuous Progress Monitoring assessments through ISIP.
- Helps students achieve reading progress with motivating animated lessons, readings, and additional skill practice.
- Continuously assesses student progress and identifies students who need additional support through instantly published reports.
- Utilizes automatically linked recommended teacher-directed lessons and supplemental materials to deliver targeted instruction for individuals or small groups.
Programs utilized by teachers as part of this department's activities include CSCOPE, ELPs, differentiated instruction, and intervention resources for all tiers and four core curriculum areas. CSCOPE is used as the vehicle for Tier 1 activities. TPRI, I-Station were used for extra intervention. Smaller group of kids go to Tier 2 and then Tier 3. Differentiated resources for all three levels are used.

STEMscopes is a comprehensive online curriculum program that provides numerous hands-on inquiry activities, plus intervention and acceleration materials, as well as teacher support resources all focused specifically on each newly-adopted science Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) student expectations. STEMscopes allows for:
-Getting students to achieve college-readiness levels in science
-Providing proven, research-based, and Rice University resources to help teachers provide rigorous instruction in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Initiative).
-Engaging students in interactive-based learning through games, virtual labs, and online assessments

Tango serves as the data system required to administer CPALLS+, which is the assessment used for PRE-kindergarten students. As is the case with the District’s early reading assessment, the students are administered a beginning, middle and end-of-year assessment. The data provided by this assessment is then used by the teachers to make appropriate adjustments to instruction to assist in enhancing student learning.

The summer and intervention academies provided for elementary students serve as a means to accelerate the learning for those students who are need of additional support. The intent is to provide engaging strategies that will support the understanding of our state standards. The idea is to provide a curriculum that supports small group instruction, with innovative ways to enhance learning. In addition, class sizes are limited to provide a more individualized approach to learning.

Elementary and Secondary Education Instructional Coaches
The Elementary and Secondary Education Department consistently provide curriculum and instruction support for grades Pre K-5 and 6-12 in the implementation of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). The district's Instructional Coaches assist campuses in improving the quality of education for all students by providing leadership, mentorship, support and expertise for teachers and staff in instructional best practices. The departments work to increase the level of all students' performance by establishing benchmarks, aligning instructional content, and assessing data in compliance with the No Child Left Behind requirements. The mission of both the Elementary and the Secondary Education Departments is to ensure the academic success of all students in the Socorro Independent School District.

Gifted and Talented
The strengths of the Gifted and Talented Program include a structured and on-going nomination and testing process. A differentiated curriculum is provided to all GT students either through a pull-out program or in a core class setting. Texas Performance Standards Projects have been incorporated as a means of ensuring students’ giftedness is enhanced at each grade level. These performance standards projects have been showcased at the campus and district level to provide students with presentation skills and to allow for peer and teacher feedback through a grading rubric provided by the state. Mentor programs and internship programs are made available to all GT students at all grade levels. Socorro ISD GT students have continuously been awarded the opportunity to attend such programs and/or camps. GT students are also provided the opportunity to excel in extra-curricular programs that support their giftedness in programs such as Team Quest, Destination Imagination, UIL Academics, Academic Decathlon, Mock Trial, and Hi-Q. There is a safety net in place to allow for student furloughs and reassessment should it be necessary.

Guidance and Counseling
The Department of Guidance and Counseling has assisted in providing opportunities for students to graduate college and career ready. This has been accomplished through providing seven Collegiate Forums (Preparing for College Forum, State Collegiate Forum, National Collegiate Forum, Military Collegiate Forum, 9th -11th Grade Alumnae/i Collegiate Forum and Senior Alumnae/i Collegiate Forum) for high school students and their families. The forums provide information on admissions process, financial aid process and other preparation for college. Supporting Documentation: Sign in sheets, agendas, PowerPoints and handouts. The Department of Guidance and Counseling also provides Students Guides to all SISD students in grades 8-12. The Student Guides provide grade level and developmentally appropriate planning tools and information for college readiness for students and parents. Guides are disseminated to students at the beginning of the school year by the school counselors. Supporting data for this includes the actual guides for each level and signed documentation of receipt by each SISD student 8-12. Guidance lessons are provided to all students PK-12 in the areas of academic success, career success and personal/social success. Students are taught skills at developmentally appropriate levels following seven counseling standards: Self Confidence Development; Motivation to Achieve; Decision Making, Goal Setting, Planning; Interpersonal Effectiveness/Appreciation of Diversity; Problem Solving Skills/Conflict Resolution; Communication Skills and Responsible Behavior. Supporting Data for this includes lesson plans, PowerPoints, handouts and sign in sheets. Guidance and Counseling Department do Individual Planning with students in grades PK-12 on goal setting, test interpretation and planning for the future. Supporting Data: Counselor logs. Guidance and Counseling Department have Financial Aid Nights and College Fairs to provide students and parents with information and resources for college planning and preparation. Supporting Data: Sign in sheets. The Department of Guidance and Counseling plans and implements Education Go Get it Week. During this week, students at all levels PK-8 are immersed in a college going culture. The hear from quest speakers, research colleges and universities, wear college shirts, take field trips to local colleges and universities and many more activities. Supporting Data: Sign in sheets and copies of activities.

Homeless Education Program
The district continues its efforts to meet the compliance requirements of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act of 2001. The H.A.N.D.S. (Helping the Academic Needs of Displaced Students) Program ensures that students experiencing homelessness are enrolled immediately and are guaranteed the right to remain at their school of origin. Through continued collaboration and coordination efforts within and outside the district, there is on-going support for the academic achievement of this population of students. Utilizing McKinney-Vento sub grant funds, the Texas Support for Homeless Education Program (TEXSHEP) grant provided opportunities for additional instructional support for a group of targeted students in this program.

Migrant Education Program
Socorro Independent School District employs a migrant recruiter who helps identify and serve the migrant families in our district. The migrant recruiter meets with migrant families using an instrument called a Certificate of Eligibility (C.O.E.) to determine whether the school -aged children qualify to participate in the migrant program. As qualified students are enrolled, Title I Instructional Specialists monitor the students' progress and ensure that students are afforded resources to assist with any academic deficiencies they may be facing. Temporary Instructional Aides are hired to assist those students who are challenged and not meeting academic standards. Campus administrators are given monthly updates of the academic progress of the migrant students attending their schools. These reports also indicate any students who have been identified as Priority for Service (PFS) students. Additional academic reinforcement is given through intercession enrichment camps provided by the Department of State and Federal Programs to address core area deficiencies that the migrant students may demonstrate. The districts goal is to ensure we help these mobile students remain academically viable. Persistent and continuous oversight of the academic standing of all migrant education students assures student progress. Oversight continues to be addressed through the academic tutelage of Teacher Instructional Aides (TIAs) assigned to respective migrant education students, scheduled reviews of progress reports, report cards, TAKS/STAAR preparation camps and parent conferences in the event students are not adequately progressing.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program has been implemented at SISD schools and has proven successful in its endeavor to lower the incidence of bullying. These campuses have been assigned district mentors who help to assist Bullying Prevention Campus Committees who, in turn, carry out anti-bullying activities.

Parental Involvement
The District Parental Involvement Program continues to provide families excellent opportunities for involvement while also providing workshops and training that help improve student performance and better communication at home with their child(ren). One Percent of the District’s Title I Funds are set aside to meet the NCLB, Section 1118- Parental Involvement Requirements. These monies are then distributed to each campus to provide parent workshops and training through the Parent Liaisons. The Department of State and Federal Programs provides funding for the placement of a Parent Liaison at each campus in order to meet all NCLB, Section 1118-Parental Involvement Requirements. This year, the EPAC members expressed that the Mother-Daughter and the Father-Son Conferences have been very successful in building bridges amongst parents and their children. It is an event that students look forward to yearly because they have some knowledge of the event and they are excited about being able to attend. These conferences offer parent opportunities of creating stronger bonds with their children.

The Bilingual/ESL Department increased parental involvement by providing two initiatives district wide. The Backpack Initiative consists of targeting at-risk ELL students in grades 3-5. This initiative provided a backpack for parents with lesson plans that were aligned with CSCOPE to better enhance the learning structure and environment at home. We provided lessons for parents so they could support their child master the TEKS.

Also, the Latino Family Literacy Project provided support for all parents at all campuses. A team from each campus received training to provide instructional strategies to parents during a 6 (secondary) or 10 (elementary) week course. Parents are learning strategies on English vocabulary development, reading skills, literacy skills, and college and career readiness skills. Parents attended weekly sessions and learned new ideas during each meeting. Also, parents were able to keep a family photo album of the learning that took place in the program.

Police Services
The Department of Police Services continues to offer presentations by its police officers on a multitude of different topics in an effort to positively affect district stakeholders so that they might benefit from safety and security. Presentations have included topics such as the SISD Student Code of Conduct, and safety issues. Also included as topics are Gang Resistance Education And Training (GREAT) as well as some on attendance/truancy programs.

Schaeffer House
Schaeffer House is a transitional living center (halfway house) under the direction of the Texas Youth Commission that houses juveniles who are being rehabilitated and transitioned back into society. Because Schaeffer House is within the boundaries of the Socorro Independent School District (SISD), it is incumbent upon SISD to provide GED instruction to all students housed at Schaeffer House who are 17 and 18 years old. The primary instructional goal is to engage the students in meaningful learning experiences (to include obtaining their GED) that will help connect the classroom curriculum to the real world. The curriculum is technology driven. The GED classroom has 8 computers with internet connection. The operating system is Windows XP and the following software is loaded on each computer: Microsoft Office and Steck-Vaughn GED Test Preparation. The vehicle used to incorporate the GED curriculum into technology education is MediaWiKi. MediaWiKi allows all users to contribute to the web site within a common guideline. The users are the GED instructor and the Schaeffer House youth enrolled in GED instruction. The GED instructor is responsible for managing the application to include creating the users on the application. The internet connection, server and maintenance of the computers will be performed by the SISD Information Technology support staff. The curriculum for the GED program is technology based. It has been of great assistance in allowing an increased number of students to acquire their GED diploma. The curriculum greatly improves the students' computer proficiency. Beyond GED instruction, students use the technology to access undergraduate education opportunities as well as FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid.) Workforce development is initiated through the implementation of a software called Career Cruising. This software gives further insight as to where the student can pursue career opportunities based on outcomes from instruments used within this software. Thereafter, placement services are provided to assure students are employed in appropriate positions.

Through collaboration with the Department of Career and Technology Education (CTE) and the Department of State and Federal Programs we were able to offer the students at Schaeffer House a better-rounded curriculum. SISD goal is to prepare those students to make a smooth transition from the halfway home to the real world.

A full time teacher was hired to offer the student three hours of GED classes and three hours of Career and Technology Education (CTE) classes. The facility has been provided with the technological tools necessary to provide educational and transitional support for the students. The students are engaged and interested in the opportunities being afforded to them.

The vision of Socorro Independent School District is "Improving Lives." Goal 1 of the 2013-2014 District Improvement Plan is that SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college ready and career ready. The Department of State and Federal Programs and the Department of Career and Technology Education facilitate the teacher in integrating current technologies and their applications, including the internet, into the curricula, by providing support and education in technology to the students at Schaeffer House. Our goal is to try to provide them with the knowledge and life skills to continue on their own upon release since many of these students have no family support.

Due to the fact that the students have been incarcerated for various offenses and they have already spent long periods of time incarcerated, their academic levels range from 2nd to 10th grade skills. Because their stay at the Schaeffer House facility is limited, very few youth who attend GED classes have the necessary skills to take and pass the GED exam upon entering the class. The GED teacher conducts an assessment upon student arrival to determine the grade level the students are working at. The teachers’ main focus is to work on the student’s Reading and Math deficiencies. The teacher tries to prepare the students to pass as many GED Exams as possible. Very few students are able to complete all GED Exams.

Secondary Education
One program that is a definite strength is the READ 180 Program. READ 180 is a reading intervention program. It is a comprehensive system which includes curriculum, instruction, assessment, and professional development and it has been proven to raise reading achievement for struggling readers in grades 4–12+. Designed for any student reading two or more years below grade-level, READ 180 leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction for students and provide powerful data for differentiation to teachers. Through studies, the program has been proven to work for students with dyslexia as well.

READ 180 is an intensive reading system designed to meet the needs of students whose reading achievement is below the proficient level. The program directly addresses individual needs through adaptive and instructional software, high-interest literature, and direct instruction in reading and writing skills.
The rBook Teaching System is the cornerstone of READ 180. The rBook Teacher's Edition incorporates proven teaching routines that develop high-utility academic vocabulary, comprehension, and writing, and instructional content that engages students as they work alongside the teacher in the rBook Pupil's Edition. Designed to provide a clear instructional path for teachers to use in whole- and small-group direct instruction, the rBook Teacher's Edition provides direct teaching, teacher modeling, guided and independent practice and application, and opportunities for pre-teaching and re-teaching. Best practices, structured engagement routines, and preteaching engage all students in concept-building, using academic language, and generating and sharing ideas. The instructional routines include the following:
• Teaching Vocabulary
• Oral Cloze
• Think (Write)-Pair-Share
• Idea Wave
• Numbered Heads
• The Writing Process
• Peer Feedback
The READ 180 Technology is "intelligent software" that provides individualized practice for a range of learners, collecting data based on individual responses and adjusting instruction to meet each students needs at his or her level, accelerating his or her path to reading mastery. As students interact with the software, they:
• Build Background Knowledge;
• Develop mental models that help to build comprehension;
• Develop, practice, and apply word recognition and reading fluency;
• Master key vocabulary;
• Practice and apply comprehension strategies;
• Develop, practice and apply spelling; and,
• Practice and apply proofreading skills.
READ 180 Direct Instruction is incorporated through the use of the rBook Teaching System, created by Dr. Kate Kinsella and Dr. Kevin Feldman. Proven instructional routines that develop high-utility academic vocabulary, comprehension, and writing, grounded in instructional content that engages students and prepares them to succeed in school in the content areas - and in life. Direct instruction lessons cover a clearly defined scope and sequence of vocabulary, comprehension, word study, phonics, writing, and grammar skills that ensure students have appropriated modeling and structure engagement routines with scaffolded supports that ensure success. Resources for Differentiated Instruction (RDI) Books 1, 2, and 3 are included to ensure all student individual needs are addressed.
The READ 180 Library provides students with daily opportunities for modeled and independent reading, with high-quality fiction and non-fiction materials, in order to transfer and reinforce skills, develop reading fluency, and build reading stamina. Leveled libraries offer students age-appropriate, relevant books that they can read with success. Audiobooks give struggling readers the opportunity to hear good reading models while accessing authentic, grade level literature.

With regards to Summer School Intervention Program, identified students attended summer school at assigned campuses. Students were selected based on academic performance (including grades and/or STAAR EOC). High school students were offered English, math, science, and social studies. Middle school students were offered English Language Arts and math. Elementary students were offered reading and math. Teachers who were selected to teach summer school attended staff development and created lessons based on student need (which was determined through data).

S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit
There are many programs in place to work with at risk students at SISD. One of them, S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S., is a program designed to address the needs of these students. It is a mobile unit, equipped with ten (10) laptops each containing an assortment of computer programs, that are designed to help students in critical areas of the curriculum. Software includes reading, vocabulary, and math. Working hand in hand with campus at risk aides, visits a periodically scheduled at campuses throughout the district. Through this communication process, teachers pinpoint the academic areas where students are struggling in the classroom. Lessons are then planned according to the request of the teacher that is based on actual needs. Providing this opportunity for students to work in small groups, and with the uniqueness of being inside a recreational vehicle, adds to student participation and success. Most of the programs used in the mobile unit keep a constant record of students work and achievement, to help make sure that student needs are being met, and that student performance is increasing.

When working with migrant students, educational support efforts are based on past test performances, grades, and benchmark assessments. At a K-8 campus, the focus this year was in 7th grade Writing. Efforts concentrated on vocabulary skills to help students with the revision portion of the STAAR test. Working with instructional aides provides a better opportunity to address the needs of individual students. These aides are in constant communication with the teachers of record, as to student academic weaknesses.

When working with migrant students, efforts are based on past test performances, to discover areas of concern. In some cases, campus administration has voiced concerns to be addressed. At a K-8 campus, the focus this year was in 7th grade Writing. Efforts were concentrated on vocabulary skills to help students with the revision portion of the STAAR test. A main goal for the coming year is to continue to work with the At-Risk aides assigned to the campuses where the mobile unit visits. Working with instructional aides provides a better opportunity to address the needs of the students. These aides are in constant communication with the teachers of record, as to student academic weaknesses.

Special Education
STAAR results indicate that the students with disabilities are performing above the state average in Social Studies (75.6%) and Writing (74.4%). Further, for students with disabilities enrolled in Career and Technical Education, the district is performing at the state average in Social Studies (70.9%).

Homebound teachers provide services to pregnant students in the students' homes. The services provided include current scheduled courses assigned at their local school. The homebound teachers collaborate with campus teachers to ensure that the students maintain academic progress and are not behind when they return to school.

State Compensatory Education
State Compensatory Education funds numerous programs and personnel in an effort to provide accelerated instructional services for students at risk of dropping out of school. SISD prides itself in providing these services and/or programs to these youth.

For example, the hiring of supplemental SCE teachers impacts student performance as these individuals provide additional interventions. Teachers can address the needs of struggling students who have deficits in their understanding of the core content material. Programs that help teachers address these deficits include: Read 180, Math labs, A+Lab, and Science labs. Additionally, the Communities in Schools (CIS) professional staff and four workers assigned to four high schools assist students who have a high absentee rate as well as those students who have a history of delinquent conduct and social service needs. CIS and the workers focus their services on at-risk students at their respective campuses. Both CIS staff members provide extensive follow-up services, additional tutoring and supportive guidance service; coordinate with health and human services to provide supportive guidance for students and parents in order to improve student attendance and to increase parental involvement; provide drop out recovery. At-risk students also receive assistance from the at-risk instructional aides, who assist teachers with direct instruction. Additionally, at least one full-time Library Media Center Aide position, who also serves as an at-risk instructional aide for fifty (50) percent of the day, provides instructional assistance to students throughout the school day. Through the collaboration between classroom teachers and the librarian, at-risk students are identified and modified instruction is delivered by the library media center aide to ensure student achievement through the library program.

Another program is the SISD Options High School (SOHS) that offers academic options for students who want to complete the necessary requirements for obtaining a high school diploma. The SOHS is a competency-based learning system with flexible scheduling for young adults who are not successfully completing a traditional high school program. The student's commitment and desire to earn a high school diploma, combined with a caring, positive learning climate, determines the student's degree of success. The Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP) provides a positive, highly structured and disciplined educational setting for at risk students. The DAEP, KEYS Academy, serves high school and middle school students in one facility. In another facility where Elementary students are served, they are self-contained. Students are placed in an academic program that replicates their home campus schedule as closely as possible. Success in the program is enhanced with small classes, parental involvement, tutoring, individual counseling, group counseling, substance abuse counseling, mentor program through community involvement, and school survival skills classes consisting of improving self-concept, behavior, personal motivation, individualistic responsibilities, study skills and awareness of career choices.

Summer/intersession intervention programs exist as yet another service for at-risk students. These programs provide supplemental instructional support for students identified as at-risk based on low performance in core areas. Tutoring may focus on either academic standards or state assessment preparation. Tutors work with students in small groups for limited periods of time to increase specific skills. A crucial component in successful tutoring programs is effective communication between classroom teachers and tutors. Tutors coordinate instruction with the classroom teacher to assure that tutoring strategies are supporting classroom instruction and that the student is benefiting from tutoring. To ensure that students are being offered proper services, the State Compensatory Education Specialist assists faculty and staff in improving and enhancing the regular education program for students in at-risk situations. The SCE Specialist ensures compensatory education increases the academic achievement of identified students in at-risk situations and reduces the dropout rate. Strategies are developed and resources are designated to meet identified areas of need of the students at-risk. Compensatory education funds are used to provide support for students at risk of dropping out of school or for students who are not performing satisfactorily in an academic setting. The SCE Specialist works with program teachers, campus administrators, and other appropriate staff in meeting instructional goals, objectives and methods. In addition, efforts to coordinate appropriate programs PK-12 are maintained so that students have the opportunity to reach optimum performance.

Each campus receives a state compensatory education allotment to serve the needs of their at-risk student population. Campuses utilize these funds to purchase supplemental materials and resources and provide intersession/tutoring sessions to help raise the academic achievement levels of their at-risk population.


GOAL 1
STUDENT FINDINGS AND NEEDS

Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) Reflection
EPAC members made several reflections regarding what is needed for the 2013-2014 school year with regard to student support. Additional web-based library research databases for students are needed to access resources at home and at school. Laptops are needed at libraries in order to support project-based learning. Suggested numbers are 20 laptops for elementary, 30 laptops for secondary. iStation was the only form of reading assessment for tiered students, but problems such as technical issues, testing environment, the need to provide modifications, vocabulary lists not matching the proper developmental stage, and the need for different programs to address varying learning styles. Teachers would like to have access to the content to allow them to refine instruction and also need training for understanding on how the program tests and "scores." There is a need for a tool like the Think through Math program to provide customized, higher level instruction. Additional training is needed for including SPED students in regular classes (CWC), to include differentiation, especially in secondary non-core subject area courses. Other items that are needed include online and on-demand professional development; recording professional development for later access; and an online forum for the sharing of ideas and strategies. Additional technical support is needed to keep computer systems working efficiently for instructional and assessment needs. It is also important to re-evaluate the need/effectiveness of the S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit and re-allocate funding as necessary. There is a need for State Compensatory Education Intervention (SCEI) Coaches to provide instructional intervention from the beginning of year, not just prior to state assessments.

There is a need for SISD to provide additional and continued staff development in the areas involving curriculum programs (Read 180, STAAR materials), technology (iPads & Nooks), and District initiatives such as Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) and attendance. Teachers should be given enough time to learn programs that the District acquires (such as Compass Learning) in order to implement them effectively. Many programs were provided without enough time to master all of them and the District outlined specific times for these programs to be used at campuses. This took time away from the delivery of lessons as well. Also, there are so many programs that it is difficult to identify the program that is most beneficial for students. As far as technology, there is a need for a specific plan as to who has access to it at campuses. Some campuses offer technology such as iPads as a whole classroom set while others break up the tools amongst teachers. If the District offers staff development for the use of such technology tools, it should also provide the necessary apps that will be needed to implement the lessons and projects learned. District initiatives need to be ongoing for the entire school year. SIOP trainings were offered, yet many interfered with the time teachers are in the classroom. EPAC members advise that more training dates be made available in the summer. Also, a clarification as to when and who needs to be trained or re-trained is needed because some campuses stated that not all teachers were trained in SIOP. Some administrators made it mandatory, while others did not. These opportunities to grow as professionals should be offered uniformly. There should be more consistency in communicating the needed trainings and qualifications to campuses. A continued system of support is needed for ELL students from the beginning of the school year until summer school at the high school level. There should be a continued program, such as Achieve3000 to target language acquisition from the elementary to middle school level. Also, more training in such programs is needed for teachers and administrators.

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21st Century Learning
For our district/campus during the 2013-2014 school year, there is a need to continue the GEAR UP-SOAR program in support of the students that are part of the cohort. The District will take the necessary steps to help the program ensure that these students succeed in their postsecondary endeavors.

Academic Services
There is a veritable need to implement instructional support for students in Reading and Mathematics at low-performing campuses. A tool to help address this that will be put in place is the Elevate K12 Program, a technology-based instructional tool that provides Pre and Post Assessments as well as learning sessions for each content area. Elevate K12's use will also track attendance and design individual learning plans for students based on their skill levels. The initial cost of the tool is $29,500, which is a cost that the Department of Academic Services regards as a worthwhile investment to help students who require the needed academic support.

Advanced Academics
AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)
Because the AVID program costs are continually rising, this is deemed as a weakness due to limited resources. The AVID organization continues to work with SISD to provide better pricing alternatives and campuses have found this to be helpful, but some campuses feel the cost outweighs the benefits.

At-Risk Student Interventions
There is an increased need to ensure the entering of At-Risk interventions (provided by teachers to At-Risk students) into the District's online database known as the At-Risk Management System (ARMS). Aside from providing a documentation bank for these interventions, the system provides recommended strategies for teachers through a dropdown menu of research-based interventions linked to and tailored to specific At-Risk codes. These interventions have been identified by State and Federal Programs staff members working with district specialists in Reading and other content areas, and well as specialists working with special populations. Reports within the ARMS database can be generated by school administrators and by State and Federal Programs staff members. Each campus has an At-Risk Coordinator who is an Assistant Principal that has been assigned to oversee services offered to At-Risk students and to ensure proper documentation of these services. The At-Risk Coordinator serves as the primary liaison between the Department of State and Federal Programs and the campus, shares information and data from ARMS at faculty meetings, and monitors interventions and documentation in ARMS.There is a marked need to make sure that At-Risk Coordinators are regularly looking at the intervention data entered by the teachers at their respective campuses and that problems in the entering of this data are addressed. If teachers do not document in ARMS as they should, then the evidence of support for each of their At-Risk students is minimized. Future teachers of these students will have no reference as to what interventions have already been tried, causing redundancy in curriculum.

Career and Technical Education
There is a need to increase the number of partners to address all of the career pathways that SISD offers. Additionally, the district needs to increase the number of Dual Credit course offerings available to our students. Increase the number of students who participate in leadership activities.

Communities In Schools
SISD Legal Policy EHBC (Special Programs - Compensatory/Accelerated Services) specifically states that "if the number of students enrolled in a school who are at risk of dropping out of school is equal to at least ten percent of the number of students in average daily attendance at the school," then the school must take part in the Communities in Schools (CIS) program. Due to this, there is a need for the District to fund CIS workers at the schools that qualify as per the above-mentioned policy. SISD must take feasible measures to ensure that CIS personnel are in place to offer services to help at risk students succeed.

Elementary Education
Progress Monitoring for Reading has increased and has been more consistent thanks to the addition of iStation. At the beginning of the school year, TPRI/Tejas Lee was undergoing technical difficulties and iStation was able to provide the monitoring pieces necessary for improved instruction. The continuance of iStation is therefore a need because of the support it offers over the difficulties of TPRI/Tejas Lee. Curriculum Mapping using CSCOPE, CSCOPE assessments tracked through Eduphoria, and CSCOPE Exemplar lessons were major contributions to improved student performance. Increased rigor, differentiation, RtI and performance based instruction will be the focus for the 2013-14 school year.

Elementary and K-8 campuses conduct Pre-K early registration in the Spring semester, so there is a need to print the materials needed for this. During this time, registration packets will be provided to parents with all the necessary forms and information needed to register their child. In addition to these packets, a brochure (both in English and Spanish) outlining all the key components of the district's PREK program will be provided to parents as a means of communication.

Gifted and Talented
An area of needed improvement is the monitoring of appropriate documentation of identified GT students. Testing timelines have been tightened, yet this continues to be a challenge for some campuses as they are not able to adhere to the testing schedule. Flexible scheduling is necessary to allow students to complete classes at their own pace. It would be beneficial to have another professional staff member in the department to assist with student testing, differentiated instruction planning - as it is challenging for one person to be able to achieve this.

Guidance and Counseling
There is a need to better assist students in the preparation for college and career readiness, therefore the Department of Guidance and Counseling has goals in place to increase the number of students receiving scholarships and the amount of award money. Better communication with students and parents is needed. Another need is a district server to notify students of scholarship opportunities. Supporting data for this includes district scholarship reports. Another weakness is the Dating Violence program in the district. It is important to make greater use of the Dating Violence program provided through the district attorney's office. Feelings of safety and security on and off campus will assist in the increase of academic achievement. Supporting data for this includes sign in sheets from each campus after completion of the program.

Many English language learners (ELL) and immigrant students enter Socorro Independent School District high schools with Mexican transcripts that must be evaluated. There is a need to support these students. To provide students every opportunity to graduate on time, LUCHA transcript services will help schools place students in the appropriate grade and core content-area courses by providing a Graduation Credit Analysis (GCA). The GCA includes a summary of credits earned in Mexico and their course equivalencies. For ELL/immigrant students who come to the District from countries other than Mexico, there is a need for the District to utilize the services of SPANTRAN, a company that also specializes in transcript evaluation. Just as with LUCHA, transcripts will be evaluated in order to place students in the appropriate grade and content-area courses.

Homeless Education Program
While working to ensure that students in the H.A.N.D.S. Program are provided with the materials and resources, there is some delay with supplies distribution due to the processing of purchase orders and/or interruptions in shipment of ordered items. There has been some difficulty in keeping instructional aide positions filled as these positions are part-time only and individuals have left for full-time job opportunities. Coordination with the University of Texas at El Paso job-line may assist with securing individuals that need part time employment while attending school.
Since many students experiencing homelessness are struggling to attend school regularly, meet core curriculum requirements, and / or pass state assessments, they need instructional support and additional monitoring. Supplemental instructional assistance is a way to ensure that homeless students have targeted academic intervention to assist them with meeting the state assessment standards.
Work to increase communication with campus personnel is needed to ensure that issues related to attendance, academic performance, and behavior are addressed in a timely manner. Instructional support personnel need to continue monitoring students identified for intervention and provide supplemental instruction, as well as, share concerns with the liaison.

Migrant Education Program
Evident by the challenges these students encounter, there continues to be a technology gap for the migrant education students. The lack of computer equipment, including digital imaging devices such as cameras, and a lack of funds to provide internet connectivity in their homes, limits the availability of online resources that could serve as a supplement to enhance the academic progress of these students. The fact that these conditions exist makes it difficult and discourages these students to pursue higher order challenges that are the norm for the non-migrant education student. Many of the students reflect language deficiencies. This limits their ability to successfully complete grade level exams, state assessments, and other instruments that determine student progress.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP)
There is a need for all campuses to be implement this program with fidelity. Campuses with new Bullying Prevention Coordinating Committees should be retrained this summer so that all campuses renew their OBPP efforts by the start of the 2013-2014 school year. There is also a need to have teachers develop additional lessons for use by campuses.

Parental Involvement Program
There is a need to afford more opportunities for parents to become involved in their children's education. This can be accomplished by consistently offering workshops, trainings and conferences at times convenient for parents to attend. Evaluation forms, sign-in sheets and surveys should be analyzed for data. By increasing parental involvement at all our campuses, student achievement will more often than not see very positive effects. We will need to seek out new ways of involve families in the education system so we can further improve student academic achievement.

Police Services
The Department needs to develop student surveys to document the effectiveness of the officers' presentations on safe and drug-free communities at the campuses. Because there is a need to increase the district's student attendance rate, the Department will be developing new strategies in an attempt to address this issue.

Research and Evaluation
Due to the expanding use of Eduphoria throughout the District, there is a need to to continue with the Eduphoria Aware software as it provides campuses with the ability to look at teacher data and performance of students by Student Expectation. There is also a need to continue with STAAR Maker Pro Item Bank so that the district is able to have a robust enough item bank in which to pull questions for common or benchmark assessments.

Schaeffer House
The majority of the students who come to Schaeffer House have release dates that do not extend beyond 2-3 months. There are occasions when students stay longer, however, the trend has been to shorten stays and re-matriculate students back into society. These circumstances do not allow students to fully take advantage of the instruction and therefore they do not complete the full course of study. This leads to students not acquiring their GED diplomas and limiting accessibility to additional opportunities provided by the program. Additionally, students come into the program with limited academic skills, based on Pre GED assessment. Some students score so poorly that the question is raised as to the likelihood of the student qualifying as a SPED or 504 student. Pursuant to this matter, the administration will begin discussion with the SPED department to develop a protocol that would provide instruments to determine the viability of academic achievement.

Secondary Education
There is a need for instructional preparation for STAAR and End of Course Exams. Additionally, the Department will be preparing students for postsecondary opportunities and education.

S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit
At present, the biggest need is for the Mobile Unit Coordinator to attend as many workshops as possible on the new STAAR test. This is necessary for the development of lessons that will be implemented during the year which will assist students in their academic performance.

Special Education
The state assessment results indicate that the students with disabilities are performing below the state average in Mathematics (47.2%), Reading/ELA (59.8%) and Science (41.4%). Further, for students with disabilities enrolled in Career and Technical Education, the district is performing below the state average in Mathematics (23.8), Reading/ELA (57.8%) and Science (31.2%). There is a definite need to provide very targeted interventions for these students in an effort to achieve at minimum state average.

Unique Learning System is a standards-based curriculum specifically designed for students with special needs. There is a need to implement it for Socorro ISD Special Education students to provide teachers with a tool to teach the TEKS to our most involved students so that this translates to success on the STAAR-ALT.

State Compensatory Education
There is a need for the newly identified State Compensatory Intervention Coaches at campuses to receive professional development for the instruction of at-risk students. These coaches will be able to share the professional development/training with campus administrators and teachers on best practices for the instruction of at-risk students. There is also a need for these At-Risk Coordinators and coaches to monitor student interventions through the At-Risk Management System. With regards to these interventions, special programs (i.e. intervention labs in math, reading and science) need to be offered in order to help students meet the at-risk exit criteria during regular instructional time. Programs may be funded in coordination with local and federal sources to meet the needs of students in at-risk situations. Continued services by the At-Risk Instructional Aides and Library Aides are necessary in order to offer students a variety of services that include, but are not restricted to, collaborating with the at-risk coordinator to ensure that at-risk students receive targeted instruction to improve student performance, working closely with SCE Intervention coaches to address the needs of at-risk students, and working with individual at-risk students or small groups of at-risk students to reinforce learning of material or skills initially introduced by the teacher. The At-Risk Instructional aide is responsible for working with direct instruction of students for eighty-five (85) percent of their time and effort, whereas library aides are accountable for working fifty (50) percent of their time with direct instruction of students.

The SISD Options High School Educational Program is still necessary in order to provide high school students with a non-traditional educational program so that students can complete credits for graduation and/or meet standards on state exit level assessment. Options High School students are expected to complete a minimum of three credits per 18 week period in order to meet the SISD graduation requirements. TEKS for each course must be mastered at 80% or better. District students whose disruptive and/or unacceptable behavior warrants removal from their home campus will still require the presence of the district DAEP program, Keys Academy. Once the appropriateness of the assignment is determined in a hearing involving an administrator from the student’s home campus, student’s parent/guardian, and the student, then the student is assigned for the appropriate number of days.

The State Compensatory Education Specialist position is still necessary for the 2013-2014 school year to evaluate and provide documentation to the State and Federal Program Director regarding progress by maintaining accurate, complete, and correct records as required by law, district policy and administrative regulation. The Specialist will work with program teachers, campus administrators, and other appropriate staff in meeting instructional goals, objectives and methods. Homebound teachers are also still needed so that the expected outcome of a student’s education will not be interrupted. Grades and completed work will be evaluated upon return to school after postpartum period. An emphasis is placed on all homebound work being completed prior to the student’s return to school.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
As stated at the end of the introduction, the District will implement objectives and strategies to improve student academic performance specifically for students identified as English Language Learners, Special Education, and African-American. Although the District will specifically work to improve standardized test scores for these students to address its failure to meet AYP, it will also utilize its resources to strengthen instruction for ALL students. A school district may fail to meet AYP in a particular area during one period of time but may fail in another area during a subsequent period. In order to prevent this, the overall instructional system must be adequately supported while tending to its areas of weakness. It is for this reason that six specific objectives in Goal 1 of the district plan address Adequately Yearly Progress. One objective (1.6) allows for the addition of general strategies to address the District's AYP status while the other five (1.7-1.11) deal specifically with raising the scores of ELL, Special Education, and African-American students.

There is a definite need to both continue and enhance high quality instruction for students in the areas of Reading and Math, and the District will continue services and/or programs that have proven successful with regard to these areas. It is imperative to understand, though, that because Reading and Writing skills are so closely tied, high quality instruction in Writing for students is an area of need that will be enhanced for this year. Professional development for teachers in this area, which will be addressed in Goal 2, will be put in place to ensure the quality of the instruction.

For objectives 1.7 and 1.8, which address ELL students, strategies have been added to provide support in the form of research-based programs, additional technology resources, funding for tutoring, and temporary instructional aides. The immediate need is to improve the reading and math scores of students identified as English Language Learners.

For objectives 1.9 and 1.10, which address Special Education students, strategies have been added to provide support in the form of instructional models for AYP and inclusion endeavors provided by Stetson and Associates. Also added was the District's use of the Lexia Program. Much like ELL students, the immediate need is to improve the reading and math scores of Special Education students.


GOAL 2
STAFF DEVELOPMENT FINDINGS AND STRENGTHS

Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) Reflection
EPAC met throughout the year and evaluated the District Improvement Plan. The following describes educational programs and their strengths based upon EPAC commentary and reflection of best practices. District level personnel were visible on campuses throughout the year. District instructional leadership conducted walk-throughs and observations to provide constructive feedback to campuses. Guidance and Counseling implemented an Appreciation of Differences Model to promote sensitivity training to campuses with emphasis placed on military families. EPAC members noted that Gifted and Talented training with online refresher courses are a very efficient method for teachers to remain in compliance with their mandatory GT hours. Another strength noted is the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP) and how it provides staff members with ways to address bullying.

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Advanced Academics - AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination
AVID campuses have been afforded professional development by attending the AVID summer institute and AVID Path training. AVID teams to include administrators, counselors, and teachers allow for a diverse population of campus staff to obtain the necessary training through the AVID summer institutes. Monthly meetings are held with coordinators to ensure that all campuses are on target to obtain AVID certification. Teachers are also provided the opportunity to attend additional training. Campuses have provided release time for campus coordinators, teachers, counselors, and administrators in order to attend professional development sessions as well as network with AVID peers throughout the district and the region.

At-Risk Student Interventions
Campus administrators were trained in the identification of at-risk students using 13 at-risk indicators as well as how to implement at-risk initiatives at their respective schools.

Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language
In the past school year, there were over 1,000 teachers that were trained in SIOP. Sheltered Instruction and ELPS trainings will continue to be provided for teachers and administrators. The Bilingual/ESL Department provided training to all coaches at the secondary level to support teachers at the campus level. Trainings will be provided afterschool as refreshers for teachers who have already been trained. Additional two day trainings will be provided to those teachers who have not attended.

Career and Technical Education
Training is provided and resources are made available to our teachers as part of professional development. They are provided with opportunities to attend local and out of town training to assist in teaching students current skills demanded by employers (trip requests). They are also provided with state of the art equipment and software which promotes top notch skills development (purchase orders). Teachers are provided with assistance in challenging additional certifications and coursework that will ultimately provide our students with advanced certifications (trip requests). Because of training, teachers provide students with the link of secondary to post-secondary and work pathway (lesson plans and post-secondary and jobsite visits).

Elementary Education
Staff development opportunities were provided to Curriculum Coaches. CSCOPE was the premise of the majority of the trainings as it is our curriculum. RtI and Progress Monitoring were embedded in the trainings referencing and training specifically on:
- iStation
- CSCOPE
- Ignite
- STEMScopes
- Guided reading
- Balanced Literacy
- 5E instructional model of teaching
- Performance based instruction
- STAAR readiness
- TEKS and content area specific trainings
- Progress Monitoring
- Brain-based strategies
- Other resources, materials and instructional practices in the area of curriculum and instruction.

Gifted and Talented
During the school year, teachers are offered opportunities to attend five six-hour sessions in the five (5) core areas of gifted education. This meets the required total of thirty (30) hours. Documentation in support of this include sign in sheets, flyers of trainings available, and the staff development website. Six (6) hour GT update opportunities for teachers were also provided. Documentation in support of this training includes sign in sheets, flyers of trainings available, and the staff development website. Six (6) hour administrator/counselor training opportunities were provided, with supporting documentation consisting of sign in sheets, flyers of trainings availables, and the staff development website. Additionally, trainings in innovative lessons, technology, and strategies for GT campus coordinators were offered, which includes sign in sheets, and the staff development website as supporting documentation. Monthly GT coordinator meetings were held in support of the program, with sign-in sheets and agendas as proof of implementation. Information was provided to teachers regarding other training opportunities too through flyers, e-mail, and the staff development website.

Guidance and Counseling
The Department of Guidance and Counseling has assisted in providing opportunities for counselors to be prepared to provide academic, career and personal/social information, strategies and interventions to students so that they are able to become college and career ready and successful members of society. The Department of Guidance and Counseling has provided training in Appreciation of Differences for Counselors. The training provides a module to assist counselors in training faculty and staff on the topic. Supporting data for this are agendas and sign in sheets. Training in Military and Transitioning Families has also been provided. This also assists counselors in working with transitioning families and students. Supporting data for this consists of agendas and sign in sheets. A minority of counselors have been trained in Grief and Trauma. This assists students with trauma and grief in their life, especially with respect to the violence in Juarez. Supporting data for this includes agendas, PowerPoint presentations, and sign in sheets. Counselors have also received training from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board on financial aid information for students and parents, with supporting data that includes sign in sheets and handouts.

Homeless Education Program
Counselors, CIS Coordinators, Social Workers, nurses, at-risk coordinators, PEIMS clerks, and registrars received updates on issues and compliance related to the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act. Presentation material and sign-in sheets document these Professional Development opportunities.

Migrant Education Program
The Teacher Instructional Aides (TIAs) were assigned migrant education students who were not doing well academically. Each TIA worked with the teachers of their assigned students to address any issues the students may have had with the subject matter. This included making up work, test preparation, subject matter tutoring, and social service assistance whenever needed. Lines of communication were also maintained on a monthly basis with the respective school administration to assure the need to focus on migrant education students who had been identified as Priority for Service (PFS) students. These students were afforded additional resources to assure academic success. In addition, the administration was kept abreast of the students who were not progressing. This was determined through review of the most recent progress reports, report cards and STAAR scores.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
District level personnel, campus administrators, and campus staff members have participated in staff development training provided through the program. They were instructed on how to establish and support the program so that students feel safe and secure at school.

Parental Involvement
Parent Liaisons are working closely with school staff, counselors and administrators to meet the needs of the campus. The District continues its commitment to increase parental and community involvement to improve student academic achievement. We want to offer parents a warm and welcoming environment where they feel they are a part of the school system. We want to encourage all parents to actively participate in their child’s education by attending the different workshops, classes and conferences offered by the district. SISD highly promotes parental involvement because we understand that the most influential people in children’s lives are their parents.

Police Services
The Department of Police Services has continued to move forward in meeting the State mandate of conducting Security Audits of each campus once every three years.
It successfully continues conducting Campus Emergency Operations Procedures (EOP) training sessions to ensure that teachers and staff have the information to instruct students at the campus level on these issues. Part of the information the department can present is the collection of campus EOPs and emergency exercise data.

Schaeffer House
The instructor is a full-time equivalent who provides GED and vocational support for students. The position is occupied by an individual who has a strong private sector background in information technology. This person is providing additional instruction through one on one assistance as well as implementing innovative ways to use technology as an instructional vehicle. The facility has been provided with the technological tools necessary to provide educational and transitional support for the students. Students are offered vocational instruction that will aid them to re-integrate into society with pertinent skills. The teacher is able to provide instruction through the use of an Interactive White Board (IWB). This facilitates the way instruction is provided for all students enrolled in GED. The teacher is able to easily facilitate and manage whole group instruction and address the needs of the students. This will increase student performance and student achievement on GED Exams.

Secondary Education
Teachers continue to have professional development opportunities in differentiation, rigor, relevance and RTI which will be offered via the Passport to Excellence initiative. Part of the data that the Department can present as evidence is the staff development website registration.

S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit
Services are offered to teachers whose students are struggling on core content areas. We work with ten students at a time in the S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit or if the campus lab is available, with the students in the labs. Teachers usually notify the Mobile Unit Coordinator about what areas they would like to focus in on. Software installed on the laptops on the mobile unit and other useful websites is used to help address needs. Students enjoy the different atmosphere provided by the mobile unit and discipline is never an issue because they know they might lose the privilege of its use.

Special Education
Training has been provided by outside speakers this year in the area of co-teaching to build the capacity of our co-teaching teams. The information has been shared on a campus-to-campus basis by Instructional Specialists as well.

State Compensatory Education
The State Compensatory Education Specialist provides staff development training to individuals whose responsibilities pertain to providing appropriate services to at-risk students including, but not limited to: At-Risk Instructional Aides, Library Instructional Aides, Supplemental SCE Teachers, Assistant Principals, SCE Secondary Intervention Coaches, and PEIMS Clerks. Trainings will cover the following topics: TEA Module 9 Regulations and Guidelines, At-Risk Student Eligibility/Exit Criteria, Personnel Job, Descriptions/Responsibilities and the Campus Action Plan.


GOAL 2
STAFF DEVELOPMENT FINDINGS AND NEEDS

Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) Reflection
Based upon EPAC’s needs-assessment of Goal 2, members reflected on areas where growth is required. Both teachers in a class-within-a-class co-teaching partnership should have opportunities to attend professional development training together, to build cohesion and a level depth of knowledge. Professional development in Writer’s Workshop should be provided at the elementary level in order to maintain consistency and alignment to the TEKS taught at the secondary level. Nooks and iPads are great learning tools. However, the purchasing of apps is a challenging process. This process needs to be streamlined in order to quickly meet the “teachable moment” and meet curriculum needs. The Olweus Anti-Bullying Program has many strong components, but the Connect with Kids videos often do not load properly. EPAC suggested that GT trainings be provided on the district website, specifically its local intranet. This should be in addition to training sessions provided at the campus level. SIOP trainings should be required (annual refreshers) not just offered---mandatory for all educators in the district. SIOP helps teachers to differentiate instruction. Additionally, the District must ensure continuation and consistency with teacher implementation of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program. Planning time for the committee to assist with adequate implementation across the entire district should be provided. Another concern to EPAC members is that the At-Risk Management System updates not lose critical data and information.

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Advanced Academics - AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)
There is a need to continue monthly AVID coordinator meetings and more information should be provided to teachers regarding other training opportunities. Release time should be continued to allow for training opportunities both within and outside of district such as Region 19, neighboring districts, and state and national conferences.

At-Risk Student Interventions
There is a veritable need to make sure that all teachers are trained to make them more effective in providing services to at-risk students. There is also a need to train new administrators and new teachers on the use of the At-Risk Management System, as well as a need to retrain current administrators and teachers who need the support.

Career and Technical Education
It is important to continue teacher completion of industry certifications to support student success.

Elementary Education
There is a need for increased focus on CSCOPE, RtI, and differentiantion for the 2013-14 School year. Addtionally, an enhanced calendar with staff development, flex day, and altered intersessions is necessary. Instructional dialogue serves as the basis for Summer Acadamies.

There is a need to provide continuous professional development and support for all certified teachers and administrators as they meet the needs of every single student in every single classroom. EPAC members, principals, instructional district and campus leaders, as well as campus instructional coaches all agreed that teachers would greatly benefit from instructional strategies that take advantage of the way the brain works to better meet the needs of all learners. Marcia Tate was an approved recommendation by the majority.

In late January 2013, TEA released the Elementary Performance Levels as related to STAAR. In comparison with other federal and District data, many campuses need additional support inclusive of targeted professional development directly to teachers of STAAR tested areas. As a result, the Curriculum and Instruction Department will identify the specific needs of campuses and provide "just in time" professional development. This endeavor is specifically addressed in strategy 2.1.8.

Gifted and Talented
Release time is still needed to allow for training opportunities both within and outside of district such as Region 19, neighboring districts, and state and national conferences. Again, it would be beneficial to have another professional in the department to assist with staff development, as multiple opportunities are provided throughout the year. It is challenging for one person to be able to achieve this.

Guidance and Counseling
To assist counselors in the delivery of academic, career, and personal/social information and resources to students, the Department of Guidance and Counseling has needs in the following areas. One area is Grief and Trauma training for all counselors through the Grief Recovery Institute. Another need is training for counselors who have not been trained in Trauma and Loss through The National Institute for Trauma and Loss in Children. This training would be for approximately one half of current district counselors. Supporting data for the implementation of this training would be agendas and sign in sheets.

The Department of Guidance and Counseling will present a half day professional development on Appreciation of Differences. Because of the changing cultures in our area, the need to train counselors, administrators, teachers and other faculty and staff, parents and community is vital. By the year 2020, the minority is expected to be the majority. The professional development will be comprised of training on the district Appreciation of Differences Module which includes Understanding Cultural Diversity, The Process of Acculturation, Educator Roles in Fostering Multicultural Awareness, Reducing Stereotypes, Prejudices, Racism and Intolerance and the last module of The Cultural Diverse Parent. Each campus will be given their own Appreciation of Differences Kit. The goal of the professional development is for participants to become aware of their own personal biases and then begin to create a personal plan of action and a campus plan of action to create an environment of respect for all. The professional development will involve individual evaluation, explanation and discovery of the module, presentations by community members and end with the plan of action.

Homeless Education Program
Training for instructional staff that provide academic support to students experiencing homelessness is necessary so that the unique issues of homelessness can be understood and addressed. In order to ensure that the homeless student population is receiving appropriate intervention, instructional staff will need training on disaggregation of data and utilization of resources to address gaps in academic performance.

Migrant Education Program
Because these students require additional assistance, guidance and monitoring, there is a need to employ additional Teacher Instructional Aides (TIAs). More students would benefit from additional TIAs. This would allow for more one-on-one time to address student shortcomings and give the student a valuable resource that could serve in a larger capacity.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
District level personnel, campus administrators, and campus staff members need refresher trainings in order to be consistent in the implementation of the program.

Parental Involvement
There is a need is to ensure that administrators understand the importance of parental involvement and ensure that parents feel welcomed at the campuses. It is important to ensure that we have a Parent Liaison at each campus that will help meet all Title I Parental Involvement requirements and help build capacity. Staff development for Parent Liaisons will continue to be focused on new ways we can engage more parents on becoming involved and on providing trainings which focus on improving academic achievement.

Police Services
In order to ensure success, the Department must enhance the Security Assessment program to follow Security Audit recommendations. It will continue to work with campus administrators to set time for teacher staff EOP training, to ensure that teachers know what actions are necessary when a crisis arises.

Secondary Education
The Department notes that more professional development is necessary for the implementation of differentiation, rigor, relevance and RTI. Additionally, a greater use of CSCOPE must occur to meet the challenges of STAAR and End of Course Exams. Implementation of school improvement endeavors must be completed which includes systemic instructional rounds.

The District sees a need to provide administration, counselors, and curriculum specialists with training on prioritizing our subpopulation assignments. This training will consist of looking at the needs of subpopulations on the campus, specifically ELL and Special Education; looking at planning, curriculum and course assignments; looking at interdisciplinary teaming and then the application of basic data from each campus to create assignments conducive to all subpopulations based on requests, school parameters and, most importantly, needs assessment data.

Schaeffer House
There is a need for more financial support from the State for this half-way house. More guidance from the Texas Youth Commission on transitional activities for delinquent youth is imperative.

S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit
To assure that we are presenting the latest in technology to teachers, there is a need to upgrade the 10 laptops on the mobile unit with Windows 7 and with RAM to increase performance. Many teachers are now used to utilizing Windows 7, and the use of XP in the mobile unit creates a mismatch in results. Although an upgrade is needed, the need may also be to replace the laptops with new ones altogether.

Special Education
There continues to be anecdotal concerns as a result of walk-throughs on some campuses that co-teaching partners are not providing equal support to the students.

For the 2013-2014 school year, there is a veritable need to train teachers on Unique Learning Systems, to provide teachers with a tool to teach the TEKS to our most involved students which will translate to success on the STAAR-ALT. Professional development sessions will be provided to meet this need, beginning in October.

State Compensatory Education
Trainings are a critical component for all stakeholders to maintain compliance of state compensatory funding of time and effort, materials, resources and program updates. Training is needed to ensure increased academic achievement of at-risk students, reduce the dropout rate of at-risk students, and ultimately eliminate any disparity in performance on assessment instruments administered between students at-risk of dropping out of school and all other district students. Continued professional development opportunities are needed for SCE funded personnel such as the SCE Instructional Specialist, SCE Intervention Coaches, Summer/Intersession Teachers, At-Risk and Library Aides, and all Social Workers in order to enhance the academic support services for at-risk students.

An annual review of the progress of students being served will be conducted to ensure student learning. A redirection of the funds or modification will be carried out as needed.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
The School Improvement Program (SIP) requires that a district that has not met its AYP requirements set aside not less than 10% of its Title I, Part A entitlement for professional development. To fulfill this SIP sanction, the District has included Objective 2.4 to clearly delineate its efforts to provide its personnel with high-quality training that will positively impact the academic performance of students. The professional development provided by the District will include training for teachers of all levels, including general education teachers, content-specific teachers, and teachers who work specifically to elevate the skills of special population students. Again, this will allow the District to concentrate on the student sub-populations that caused it not to meet AYP, but will also strengthen the overall instructional system.

As mentioned in Goal 1, there is a veritable need to provide professional development to teachers in the area of Writing so that Reading skills, in turn, are bolstered. Teachers at multiple levels need extra support with this and the District will respond by providing funding for training sessions of this nature, even on Saturdays.

In objective 2.4, strategies have been added that outline how teachers will continue to be trained in sheltered instruction, instituted by the Bilingual Education Department. Support for English Language Arts as they relate to Career and Technical Education teachers is also being included. Finally, training for teachers in the instructional models from Stetson and Associates that help with meeting AYP and inclusion have been added, instituted by the Department of Special Education.


GOAL 3
PARENTAL ENGAGEMENT FINDINGS AND STRENGTHS

Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) Reflection
EPAC expressed there are a variety of state and federal programs that have continued to play an active role in promoting and supporting community and parental engagement, in order to improve student achievement. Special Education services continue to strive in the areas of transportation and in the implementation of The James Butler games. The Bilingual Education Department's Achieve3000 has helped parents and students with strengthening English language skills. Programs such as the Parent Liaison Initiative have strengthened parent and community involvement at the campus level. This position, in particular, has shown to be critical in providing services to parents and therefore, benefit student success. From the parent and community perspective, the Gifted and Talented (GT) program has demonstrated that it is strong and successful. Parents are informed of activities and of special events that showcase the efforts of GT students. The Mother-Daughter and the Father-Son Conferences have been very successful in building bridges between schools, parents, and children. They are events that students and parents look forward to attending because of the services and activities that are offered. Autism in-home trainers work constantly with parents to provide creative materials that are unique to each child’s needs. It is vital to serve parents with children with special needs to enhance educational progress.

----------

Advanced Academics - AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)
Parents are provided the opportunity to learn about the AVID program through Parent Advocacy Meetings. In addition, parents are able to attend the AVID Recognition Banquets and AVID Community Project Sessions. Finally, parents are afforded more information regarding AVID at the individual campus information nights as well as the District Advanced Studies Forum.

At-Risk Student Interventions
A strength at SISD is that it has an alternative high school or school of choice (Options High School) with capacity to serve 150-200 at-risk and recovered dropout students. Admission based on recommendations from counselors at district high schools and interviews with students and their families.

Career and Technical Education
The Department provides parents with information on CTE course offerings and opportunities for their students. Some sources of this information include the updated CTE website, a program catalog, school open-houses (list of visitations), and program posters and brochures.

Gifted and Talented
A definite set of strengths exist for the GT program. Monthly advocacy meetings for parents of GT students occur. Evidence of these meetings are sign in sheets, monthly fliers, invitations, and website information. The GT annual showcase is an event that involves educators and parents to promote the excellent academic products of students. Evidence of this showcase are invitations, sign in sheets. Informational nights for all parents regarding GT program occur at district campuses as well.

Guidance and Counseling
The Department of Guidance and Counseling has assisted in providing parents and the community information and resources in the following areas: academic, career and personal/social. This has been accomplished through providing seven Collegiate Forums (Preparing for College Forum, State Collegiate Forum, National Collegiate Forum, Military Collegiate Forum, 9th -11th Grade Alumnae/i Collegiate Forum and Senior Alumnae/i Collegiate Forum) for high school students and their families. The forums provide information on admissions process, financial aid process and other preparation for college. Supporting documentation consists of sign in sheets, agendas, PowerPoints and handouts. Guidance and Counseling Departments provide training on financial aid and college readiness at all levels, PK-12, following SB 158. Supporting data consists of agendas and sign in sheets. Guidance and Counseling Departments provide parent training to middle and high school students on the advantages of Pre-AP and AP classes explaining the importance of rigor in the curriculum. Supporting data consists of agendas and sign in sheets. Guidance Departments also provide parent training in test taking skills and other topics that increase academic achievement. Supporting Data consists of agendas and sign in sheets.

Homeless Education Program
Parent Liaisons participated in an overview of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act. Parent Liaisons were able to assist at the campus level with identification of students experiencing homelessness. Assistance with information about community resources was shared with parents in need by the Homeless Liaison.

Migrant Education Program
Parent communication concerning student progress is on-going. Professional development for parents is provided and used as a vehicle to communicate with the parents concerning their children. Community resources and social service resources are made available to the parents in the event a parent expresses a need for such intervention.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
Bullying Prevention Campus Committees (BPCC) include parent representatives that make a vital home-school connection, helping to ensure the success of the program at the respective campus.

Parental Involvement
We have seen an increase in parental involvement district wide. Parents requested that we continue to offer the Father-Son and the Mother-Daughter Conference. Parent Liaisons strive to meet the needs of their community by focusing their workshops and trainings on the community's particular needs. The Parent Liaisons continue to do a great job of supporting our families by providing ESL classes for parents and by providing Family Frameworks parenting workshops. The parenting class workshops help parents provide greater support for their children at home. Some of these workshops help parents get a better understanding of what their children are facing at school. Their classes and workshops are helping to bring more parents into the schools. Parents are also being kept abreast of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program being implemented district-wide. The Parent Liaisons are offering classes and informing parents of the program and the changes which are taking place at the campuses in order to implement the program with fidelity. Awareness of the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program is increasing and parents are having a better understanding of what bullying is and what it isn’t. Our goal is to educate our local community on bullying and to recognize how to intervene if someone is being bullied. We want to increase awareness throughout the community so that our children can feel safe.

Police Services
The Department of Police Services has carried out various presentations for the benefit of parental and community involvement. These presentations include People Responding to Innovative Creative Education (PRICE), community Events, web email, campus posters, Justice of the Peace Programs, Parent Liaisons programs, and Parent Volunteer Programs. Many of our local businesses with interest in providing information to families are contacting the Parent Liaisons to set up presentations and provide information for parents. Examples of these are: The County Attorney’s Office, University Behavioral Health (UBH), El Paso County-Texas AgriLife Extension Service as well as many others. Parents are benefiting from the informational workshops being set-up and provided through the Parent Liaisons.

Secondary Education
The Department of Secondary Education strengths for goal 3 include the holding of District Community Forums and Parent Advisory Committees, both of which provide venues for building bridges between parents and community members. Evidence of these venues include agendas and session rosters.

Schaeffer House
The instruction is provided within a Texas Youth Commission (TYC) transitional living center. Because the students live within the confines of the facility, parental in-put is for the most part non-existent. However, the TYC social workers collaborate with outside agencies to address the needs of the students.

Special Education
Parents have been informed and participated in a variety of trainings presented both in the district and in the community. General funds have been set aside for this purpose and those funds have been exhausted. The district has an excellent relationship with a variety of local agencies, including Children with Disabilities Information Coalition.


GOAL 3
PARENTAL ENGAGEMENT FINDINGS AND NEEDS

Educator’s Professional Advisory Committee (EPAC) Reflection
EPAC expressed that certain needs should be addressed by the District for the 2013-2014 school year regarding parental involvement and/or community engagement. Based on all the activities that the district is providing for parents, such as summits, conferences, etc., SISD needs to implement better methods of communication and more engaging activities so that parents are more likely to attend events. Although they are advertised, it is important to make greater efforts to notify parents and community members of the various activities available. Efforts need to be made to include parents of students with various types of needs being served in co-teaching, BIC, resource, and self-contained classes as well as specialized units. These efforts will expand the audience and create opportunities for additional parent support. Additionally, providing speakers that will address information to support academic, behavioral, life, career and college readiness skills is important. The Special Education Department's "Coffee with the Director" needs to be specific and provided by feeder pattern according to needs and for better access to parents in the specific area. It is important to provide district wide coordinated academic events such as Math, Literacy, Science, and Technology nights. Parent Liaisons need to standardize the parent sessions they offer so they are aligned across the District. The Olweus Anti-Bullying material used at each campus needs to be updated yearly at the district level and linked to current events to ensure consistency, continued involvement, and enhanced participation of students throughout the District. More training on autism should be made available for teachers, parents, and students. Increased parent and community awareness of the rights of the homeless, and of the services that are available to them is needed.

----------

Advanced Academics - AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination)
There is a need for more frequent advocacy/informational meetings at the district level for parents of AVID students.

At-Risk Student Interventions
There is a need to communicate more with parents and community members on how to lower the percentage of students at risk of dropping out of school. More communication is also necessary between departments and/or programs that can influence this notion. For example, while Police Services attends to safety for students by educating them about gangs, this can also have an effect on the at-risk rate.

Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language
The Bilingual/ESL Department will continue to work collaboratively with State & Federal Programs to fulfill the need for conferences for parents such as the Mother/Daughter Conference and Father & Son conference. In addition, there is a need to continue with the Latino Family Literacy Project that was introduced this past school year. Parents attended sessions that were geared to help their child at home.

Career and Technical Education
There is a need to increase the number and quality of program posters and brochures.

Gifted and Talented
Some of the needs for GT include greater participation in parent nights. There were phone call/messages from parents at the last minute stating that they did not know a meeting was taking place, so communication must be enhanced. It would be beneficial to have assistance from other campus coordinators during parent nights as language is an issue with many parents who attend.

Guidance and Counseling
Although parent and community participation is acceptable, the Department of Guidance and Counseling has a need to increase parent and community participation in Collegiate Forums, Community meetings and training by counselors. This could be accomplished by a more rigorous notification system at each campus and at the district level. Supporting documentation consists of sign in sheets and agendas.

Homeless Education Program
Parents of our Homeless students have historically not been able to attend Parent Involvement sessions provided by campus-based parent liaisons. Based on sign-in sheets from 2010-2011, less than 5% of the parents of our homeless students attended any parenting sessions provided by the campus, district or Region 19 ESC.

In today’s educational world, many parents lack the skills necessary to assist their children with academic support. Homeless parents are faced with multiple issues and may need a support system within the school setting that can help them address these issues and provide them with guidance on ways to assist their children enrolled in school. Parenting curriculum designed to address these issues with parents is necessary for the district parent liaisons to incorporate into sessions designed for homeless parents.

Migrant Education Program
Lack of viable lines of communication makes it difficult to communicate with parents. Parental contacts through home visits and parent meetings make communicating with parent's time intensive. The inability of parents to maintain consistent phone numbers also serve as a deterrent in the department's ability to communicate with parents.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program
More parents and community members need to be notified of the Olweus Program and how it functions at campuses.

Parental Involvement
The District should invite more local businesses and community services who can provide trainings on how they can provide support for our families. There is a need to reach out to different parents. Parent Liaisons tend to see the same parents coming into volunteer and attend workshops. We want to encourage more parents to become involved and become a part of the school system.

Police Services
There is a need for funds and resources to continue to make P.R.I.C.E. Mobile Unit and Officer Presentations available to parents and community members during nontraditional school hours. Partnerships with organizations to assist with materials and supplies used to present to parents and community members are also needed.

Schaeffer House
The Upper Rio Grande Workforce Commission needs to become a bigger player in the workforce development for these students. There needs to be an increase in viable employers who offer technology opportunities to address the needs of these students. Currently there is limited outreach and the lack of viable employers is evident by the quality of employment (fast food industry) offered to these students.

Secondary Education
Informational and awareness sessions for parents on STAAR , End of Course Exams, graduation and postsecondary education are needed.

Special Education
In review of the conferences and meetings that the district has sent parents to, it is apparent that most of the parents involved have children with Autism. The department will work on reaching out to parents with children with other disabilities to ensure that they receive the benefit of professional development.

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP)
Objective 3.3 has been added to Goal 3 of the district plan specifically to increase communication efforts between the district and parents of students. For students attending campuses that failed to meet Adequate Yearly Progress, the District notified parents by mail of their "School Choice" option, which allows them to choose to send their child(ren) to another school in the District. This is mandated by the School Improvement Program as part of the sanctions for not meeting AYP. Objective 3.4 has been added to Goal 3 of the district plan to delineate additional strategies that will increase parental involvement for the purpose of increasing student academic performance, in turn driving the District effort to meet AYP.

To positively impact Parent and Community Engagement, strategies have been added to objective 3.4, which address how the District will meet its AYP requirements. These strategies include the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program and its parent out-reach activities, training and activities implemented by the Bilingual Education Department in support of parents of ELL students, and various endeavors undertaken by the Special Education Department to connect with parents and increase their involvement with regards to the academic support of Special Education students.


SUMMARY

For the 2013-14 school year, substantial and elevated rigor surrounding our students' academic performance standards and expectations when coupled with the significant reduction in resources and revenue will demand that all school districts across Texas, but especially those districts with student demographics deemed highly at-risk, allocate all available resources in a thoughtful, deliberate and purposeful manner.

An analysis of our preliminary state assessment data indicates that our students' academic performance in mathematics, science, and social studies continues to improve while our reading and writing scores maintain. Every year, the number of students enrolling in dual-credit courses; advanced placement courses; the International Baccalaureate program; STEM academies; and, Career and Technology Education programs increases. Mission Early College High School (MECHS) continues to be a model early college high school for other districts throughout the country to visit and consider. Our partnerships with the El Paso Community College, the University of Texas at El Paso, and The College Board have never been stronger. Notwithstanding all this momentum, what is most telling and likely a better predictor of future student performance on the STAAR/EOC examinations are the commended performance rates. And, at present, the commended performance rate of our students, but especially of our at-risk students, is low and unacceptable.

Over the past several months, staff has worked closely with EPAC to reaffirm our commitment to ensuring that the resources are decentralized and as close to the four corners of the classroom, as possible. The District with the support of EPAC and an unwavering commitment will continue to promote a viable and rigorous curriculum via CSCOPE - our curriculum management system. CSCOPE will ensure that teachers have the tools to pace their instruction; cover the standards-based, curriculum and differentiate the instruction based on the needs and learning style of their respective students. Most importantly, CSCOPE will guarantee depth and rigor of understanding - a taught curriculum that will ultimately address and improve the commended performance rates across the District for all students. Notwithstanding, all the benefits of CSCOPE in insuring a rigorous and differentiated taught curriculum, the District will also continue to manage the instruction by investing in Curriculum Coaches and Instructional Specialists. It will also continue with the Passport to Excellence program as part of a rigorous and robust professional development calendar that affords all teachers opportunities to improve on their craft of teaching and learning, especially during the summer and on pre-determined staff development days built into the work calendar.

When coupled with the tandem of the Eduphoria assessment software and the iStation; an English language proficiency diagnostic tool; teachers will be able to quickly and regularly assess and monitor the progress of their students.

SISD staff members have established themselves as genuine powerhouses of creativity and hard work. Without their diligent action, student success would be difficult, if not impossible, to attain. The District invests in the betterment of its employees in order to bolster student achievement. While many items, such as training sessions, are made available to help staff members to develop their abilities, it should be stated that even more is necessary to ensure favorable outcomes for the future of District students.

Parents are the most powerful influence on the education of children, and SISD is proud to have many programs in place in order to secure their involvement. Never before has it been so evident that it truly does take a village to raise a child. This is why SISD has instilled within its functions the effort to include parents and community members in the education of students. The Parent Liaison program and the Partners in Education program are only two excellent verifications of this endeavor. An undeniable need with regards to this is that more parent-community involvement must occur. With the positive presence of parents and community members, student achievement will be boosted to an even higher level.

In conclusion, the Socorro Independent School District continues to invest in Teaching, Learning and Leadership from all stakeholders. With this esprit de corps, we are confident that we will continue our legacy of success well into the future. We thank all parties for their participation and contributions in the development of this District Improvement Plan.
State Budget
Object Code Description Gifted & Talented
21
Career & Technology
22
Special Education
23
Bilingual Education
25
High School Allotment
31
Totals
6112 SALARIES/WAGES SUBS $13,062.00 $110,643.00 $38,159.08 $118,030.00 $0.00 $279,894.08
6118 EXTRA DUTY PAY $63,500.00 $79,600.00 $849,506.63 $651,909.08 $72,668.00 $1,717,183.71
6119 SAL/WAGES TEACHER/PROF $160,081.00 $7,484,621.63 $16,288,747.13 $469,259.00 $1,709,022.25 $26,111,731.01
6121 OVERTIME-SUPPORT PRSNL $0.00 $800.00 $3,000.00 $383.48 $0.00 $4,183.48
6125 PARTIME SALARIES $0.00 $14,000.00 $0.00 $84,256.23 $66,862.00 $165,118.23
6129 SALARIES/WAGES SUP PERS $0.00 $45,245.00 $6,279,189.54 $34,029.00 $0.00 $6,358,463.54
6139 EMPLOYEE ALLOWANCES $1,392.00 $6,264.00 $219,291.00 $16,686.00 $0.00 $243,633.00
6141 SOCIAL SECURITY/MEDICARE $2,341.00 $108,548.85 $345,749.08 $13,442.00 $24,780.46 $494,861.39
6142 GROUP HEALTH/LIFE INS $12,042.00 $872,109.10 $3,848,278.98 $54,189.00 $197,240.20 $4,983,859.28
6143 WORKERS' COMPENSATION $1,429.00 $65,951.09 $363,472.19 $8,005.00 $15,120.68 $453,977.96
6146 TEACHER RET/TRS CARE $3,073.00 $123,279.00 $360,356.81 $12,515.00 $31,310.00 $530,533.81
6149 OTHER EMPLOYEE BENEFITS $0.00 $4,617.39 $5,659.17 $210.03 $517.10 $11,003.69
6219 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $0.00 $0.00 $15,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $15,000.00
6222 STUDENT TUIT-PUBLIC SCHOO $0.00 $0.00 $190,000.00 $0.00 $0.00 $190,000.00
6249 CONTRACTED MAINT/REP $0.00 $7,200.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $7,200.00
6269 RENTALS-OPERATING LEASES $2,000.00 $5,000.00 $10,037.92 $6,790.52 $0.00 $23,828.44
6295 MS LICENSES $120.00 $360.00 $7,200.00 $551.00 $0.00 $8,231.00
6299 MISC CONTRACTED SERVICES $11,389.00 $82,285.43 $190,097.00 $8,293.50 $607,955.00 $900,019.93
6319 MAINTENANCE/OPER SUPPLIES $0.00 $400.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $400.00
6321 TEXTBOOKS $25,787.18 $194,219.21 $0.00 $0.00 $102,020.00 $322,026.39
6329 READING MATERIALS $15,880.61 $105,962.60 $3,000.00 $43,146.72 $10,276.00 $178,265.93
6339 TESTING MATERIALS $37,506.15 $74,624.45 $41,500.00 $18,150.00 $146,233.00 $318,013.60
6395 TECHN EQUIP UNDER $5,000 $53,839.70 $991,817.74 $51,329.97 $85,045.98 $87,839.83 $1,269,873.22
6396 FURN & EQUIP UNDER $5,000 $0.00 $540,332.68 $11,683.04 $0.00 $0.00 $552,015.72
6399 GENERAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS $104,887.11 $719,863.85 $173,800.36 $235,916.87 $256,529.22 $1,490,997.41
6411 TRAVEL EMPLOYEE ONLY $16,168.00 $162,743.40 $32,350.00 $6,660.00 $52,725.00 $270,646.40
6412 TRAVEL STUDENTS $105,948.25 $313.60 $1,000.00 $0.00 $15,000.00 $122,261.85
6419 TRAVEL NON EMPLOYEE $0.00 $0.00 $5,500.00 $0.00 $0.00 $5,500.00
6494 DISTRICT BUS TRANSPORTATI $20,888.00 $15,000.00 $25,100.00 $4,025.00 $350,000.00 $415,013.00
6499 MISC OPER COSTS $4,680.00 $30,270.00 $2,300.00 $3,495.00 $625.00 $41,370.00
6631 VEHICLES OVER $5,000 $0.00 $16,124.04 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $16,124.04
$656,014.00 $11,862,196.06 $29,361,307.90 $1,874,988.41 $3,746,723.74 $47,501,230.11


State Compensatory Education Budget
Object Code Description Accelerated Education
24
Disciplinary
28
SchoolWide SCE
30
6112 SALARIES/WAGES SUBS $500.00 $37,874.00 $0.00
6118 EXTRA DUTY PAY $500.00 $35,111.00 $1,902,791.00
6119 SAL/WAGES TEACHER/PROF $170,308.00 $1,088,309.92 $10,380,835.78
6121 OVERTIME-SUPPORT PRSNL $0.00 $500.00 $0.00
6125 PARTIME SALARIES $0.00 $5,000.00 $10,080.00
6129 SALARIES/WAGES SUP PERS $0.00 $406,697.09 $822,108.60
6139 EMPLOYEE ALLOWANCES $3,654.00 $3,732.00 $0.00
6141 SOCIAL SECURITY/MEDICARE $2,522.00 $22,719.63 $163,177.04
6142 GROUP HEALTH/LIFE INS $12,042.00 $225,780.90 $1,472,695.66
6143 WORKERS' COMPENSATION $1,521.00 $18,690.87 $95,616.98
6146 TEACHER RET/TRS CARE $2,687.00 $19,900.00 $172,320.00
6149 OTHER EMPLOYEE BENEFITS $0.00 $571.41 $3,703.12
6239 CONTRACTED SERVICES $0.00 $312.00 $0.00
6269 RENTALS-OPERATING LEASES $0.00 $7,800.00 $0.00
6299 MISC CONTRACTED SERVICES $2,000.00 $35,000.00 $373,000.00
6319 MAINTENANCE/OPER SUPPLIES $0.00 $11,650.00 $0.00
6329 READING MATERIALS $0.00 $1,000.00 $70,000.00
6395 TECHN EQUIP UNDER $5,000 $0.00 $13,440.00 $0.00
6396 FURN & EQUIP UNDER $5,000 $0.00 $3,016.00 $0.00
6399 GENERAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS $0.00 $22,506.00 $120,433.00
6411 TRAVEL EMPLOYEE ONLY $0.00 $4,582.00 $5,625.00
6412 TRAVEL STUDENTS $0.00 $2,000.00 $0.00
6494 DISTRICT BUS TRANSPORTATI $0.00 $0.00 $10,204.00
6499 MISC OPER COSTS $0.00 $6,616.00 $3,500.00
$195,734.00 $1,972,808.82 $15,606,090.18


Title I Budget
Object Code Description Title I, Part A Title I, Part C Title I, Part D
6112 SALARIES/WAGES SUBS $38,000.00 $0.00 $0.00
6118 EXTRA DUTY PAY $143,393.00 $0.00 $0.00
6119 SAL/WAGES TEACHER/PROF $967,860.00 $0.00 $15,047.00
6121 OVERTIME-SUPPORT PRSNL $0.00 $2,455.00 $0.00
6125 PARTIME SALARIES $0.00 $13,851.00 $0.00
6129 SALARIES/WAGES SUP PERS $637,765.00 $48,932.00 $0.00
6139 EMPLOYEE ALLOWANCES $14,616.00 $0.00 $0.00
6141 SOCIAL SECURITY/MEDICARE $22,061.00 $1,073.00 $219.00
6142 GROUP HEALTH/LIFE INS $370,876.00 $6,832.00 $3,311.00
6143 WORKERS' COMPENSATION $10,646.00 $413.00 $127.00
6146 TEACHER RET/TRS CARE $113,885.00 $5,744.00 $1,137.00
6219 PROFESSIONAL SERVICES $4,400.00 $5,300.00 $0.00
6249 CONTRACTED MAINT/REP $0.00 $700.00 $0.00
6299 MISC CONTRACTED SERVICES $948,912.00 $9,000.00 $0.00
6311 GASOLINE & OTHER FUELS $0.00 $1,200.00 $0.00
6319 MAINTENANCE/OPER SUPPLIES $0.00 $100.00 $0.00
6329 READING MATERIALS $72,944.00 $300.00 $0.00
6395 TECHN EQUIP UNDER $5,000 $10,800.00 $300.00 $0.00
6399 GENERAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS $286,948.00 $14,799.00 $0.00
6411 TRAVEL EMPLOYEE ONLY $2,450.00 $2,910.00 $0.00
6412 TRAVEL STUDENTS $0.00 $5,840.00 $0.00
6419 TRAVEL NON EMPLOYEE $1,203.00 $0.00 $0.00
6494 DISTRICT BUS TRANSPORTATI $0.00 $800.00 $0.00
6499 MISC OPER COSTS $111,250.00 $950.00 $0.00
NOTE* INDIRECT COST $126,368.00 $1,616.00 $264.00
NOTE** CAMPUS ALLOCATION $5,740,005.00 $0.00 $0.00
$9,624,382.00 $123,115.00 $20,105.00


Title II & III Budget
Object Code Description Title II, Part A Title III
6118 EXTRA DUTY PAY $0.00 $26,311.00
6119 SAL/WAGES TEACHER/PROF $572,347.76 $0.00
6125 PARTIME SALARIES $0.00 $580,926.00
6129 SALARIES/WAGES SUP PERS $27,200.50 $0.00
6139 EMPLOYEE ALLOWANCES $15,912.00 $0.00
6141 SOCIAL SECURITY/MEDICARE $8,693.44 $8,926.00
6142 GROUP HEALTH/LIFE INS $59,586.84 $0.00
6143 WORKERS' COMPENSATION $5,055.39 $5,191.00
6146 TEACHER RET/TRS CARE $49,126.98 $46,646.00
6299 MISC CONTRACTED SERVICES $202,020.06 $10,000.00
6329 READING MATERIALS $0.00 $60,000.00
6399 GENERAL SUPPLIES & MATERIALS $29,100.00 $61,768.00
6499 MISC OPER COSTS $8,600.00 $5,000.00
NOTE* INDIRECT COST $13,007.00 $10,707.00
$990,649.97 $815,475.00


Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.1 By Spring 2014, SISD campuses will have a 10% increase over the 2012-2013 test results for STAAR, STAAR-M, STAAR-Alt, and EOC.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.1.1 Provide scientifically research based supplemental resources, equipment and materials for instruction and/or intervention in the entire core curriculum.
1 checkbox 2 checkbox
3 checkbox 4 checkbox
5 checkbox 6 checkbox
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Elementary; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Director, Career and Technical Education; Director, Bilingual Education / ESL; Director, Special Education Daily, Monthly, Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $639,335.05; Title II: $30,000; Title III, LEP: $128,876; Bilingual: $15,000; GT: $1,000; CTE: $5,000 Purchase orders, sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates, materials, bid list Sign-in sheets, agendas, evaluations, training dates, principal walkthroughs, student scores, lesson plans Middle of year student scores End of year student scores to include classroom grades and state assessments.
1.1.2 Provide tutoring services to students during intersessions, after school, and Saturdays.
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Elementary; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Director, State and Federal Programs; Campus Administrators Daily, Saturdays, Weekly, Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession SCE: $2,100,986.00; Title I, Part A: $13,851 (TIAs) Extra duty pay lists, Student rosters Increase in reading scores (MOY and EOY) 2% Increase in classroom Reading assessment by middle of year. Overall increase in Reading scores on STAAR.
1.1.3 Provide targeted assistance, supplemental support, and intervention for At-Risk students to increase student passing rates in all content areas (encompasses At-Risk Aides, Bilingual Aides, Library Aides, & other).

TEC § 29.081
Financial Accountability Systems Resource Guide (FASRG) Section 9.2.3
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Director, Special Education; Director, Bilingual Education / ESL; Director, State and Federal Programs; Coordinator, Library Services Daily, Weekly Title III, LEP: $30,000; SCE: At-Risk Aides (28 FTEs) $787,317; Title I, Part A: $81,000.00, Title I Aides (29 FTEs) $666,082, Library Aides $553,561 (50%/50%); Special Education Aides (30 FTEs) $525,000 Personnel Action Forms, duty schedules, signed job descriptions, time and effort logs, teacher schedules, student rosters, Instructional Specialist assigned to oversee aides, lesson plans, sign-in sheets English language acquisition and increase state assessment overall scores by ELL students; increased state assessment scores for at-risk students Benchmarks, SELP testing, classroom observations State assessment scores, decreased percentage of at-risk students
1.1.4 Ensure appropriate assessments to determine eligibility and skill levels for Special Education students which support instruction.

(Assess 2 times each 9 weeks)
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Director, Special Education Weekly Special Education:$10,000 Eligibility numbers and state performance plan results, PBMAS State and Federal accountability standards are met at school and district level. Eligibility Data, Medicaid Rosters PEIMS Submission (with eligible students noted)
1.1.5 Provide online connectivity, equipment, and instructional materials to aid homebound students.
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Director, Special Education Weekly Special Education: $20,000 Lesson plans, work orders, purchase orders, bid list, teacher logs Usage reports Benchmarks scores State assessment scores
1.1.6 Develop contractual relationships with other entities to ensure that all Special Education students living within our boundaries receive appropriate services.
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Director, Special Education Monthly Medicaid: $100,000 Contracts and payment procedures No parental complaints Mid-year documentation Final billing
1.1.7 Utilize the S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. (Socorro Offering Children Relevant And Technological Experiences in Science) Mobile Unit to provide students with additional instructional support and access to computers and internet. In addition, ensure operating maintenance and repair of units is ongoing to continue providing instructional services.

(ILT)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Weekly Title I, Part A: $582; Title I, Part C: $2,122.48 Student sign-in sheets, samples of student work Student sign-in sheets, samples of student work, visit schedules Student benchmark scores, student surveys Student benchmark scores, student surveys, samples of student work
1.1.8 Increase SISD homeless student achievement in core content areas through: improved identification and immediate enrollment, timely distribution of school supplies and/or requested articles of clothing, dental and vision screenings, expeditious evaluation of students in need of intervention and/or special education.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Special Education Monthly Title I, Part A: $11,500 Student Residency Questionnaires, Health Referrals, ARMS documentation, sign-in sheets, and agendas Increased enrollment, referrals, improved documentation, enhanced monitoring results Improved report card grades and benchmark assessment results Increase in state assessment scores results by 4% in all core content areas
1.1.9 Provide academic intervention to include materials and/or technology equipment purchases to assist homeless students identified most at-risk based on TAKS/STAAR assessment results, retention rates, district initiatives for targeting student achievement, attendance rates, teacher/staff referral, etc.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Homeless Liaison, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester McKinney-Vento Sub Grant: $41,399 Title I, Part A: $1,000 Contracts for instructional aides Personnel assignment documents, individual student PEIMS data, tutoring logs Increase on report card grades, attendance rates, benchmark scores Increase in state assessment results, promotion, graduation rates
1.1.10 Increase SISD Migrant student readiness (early childhood)and achievement in core content areas through: timely distribution of school materials, supplies and/or requested articles of clothing, dental and vision screening, expeditious evaluation and monitoring of students in need of intervention, provide temporary instructional aide for struggling and "Priority for Service" migrant students.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Special Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $13,529.99 Sign-in sheets, agendas, monitoring visits Improve report card grades and benchmark assessment results Increase students passing rates, sign-in sheets, agendas and monitoring visits Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates
1.1.11 Provide funds for supplemental instructional support, Highly Qualified teachers for tutoring, and/or summer school services to students attending Private-Nonprofit schools along with technical support to house data on a web-based system and mail annual Intent to Participate invitations to all area Private-Nonprofit schools through ESC Region 19.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester, 3rd 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $13,800 Contract submission for Highly Qualified teacher to provide supplemental instruction Improved student performance in regular classroom Report card grades Improved yearly assessment scores
1.1.12 Utilize technology software, equipment (including digital cameras) and wireless internet access to provide opportunities for additional academic support for migrant students. Provide additional academic on-line software access (Kineo) that will support in closing academic gaps and assist with monitoring progress.

(QD)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $8,500 Student usage reports, samples of student work, purchase orders Student sign-in sheets, samples of student work, increase student English language aquisition Student benchmark scores, student surveys Student benchmark scores, student surveys, STAAR results, Performance Based Monitoring Analysis System report
1.1.13 Implement the use of 4 Social Workers and Communities in Schools (CIS) Coordinators at campuses to assist students to acquire resources to improve academic performance, increase self-esteem, and develop social skills.

TEC § 29.081
Financial Accountability Systems Resource Guide (FASRG) Section 9.2.3
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs; Campus Principals Spring Semester, Fall Semester Social Workers (4 FTEs) $240,000 (SCE) ; CIS / Total $725,000 - (1 FTE) $35,000 (100% Title I Part A) (20 FTEs) $345,000 (50% Title I Part A), (20 FTEs) $345,000 (50% SCE) Personnel Action Forms, signed job descriptions, student rosters, signed contracts, purchase orders Improved academic performance Improved mid-year academic performance Improved end-of-year academic performance including state assessment scores
1.1.14 Employ a State Compensatory Education Specialist in the SISD Department of State and Federal Programs to work in collaboration with SCE funded personnel to ensure services for at-risk students.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs Daily SCE: $74,697 Personnel Action Form, signed job description, duty schedule Increased availability of mentoring and academic support for at-risk students Improvement of at risk student scores Improvement of at risk student scores, diminished percentage of at-risk students
1.1.15 Provide access for Special Education students to medical and specialized services within the community and specific to their disabilities to ensure success in the classroom.

(AP)
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Director, Special Education Monthly Special Education: $250,000 Purchase orders, executed medical services Increase in academic performance of Special Education students Overall mid-year increase in the scores of Special Education students. Overall end-of-year increase in the scores of Special Education students.
1.1.16 Provide supplemental services to include intersession, all materials, snacks, and program costs for students in the Migrant Education Program to increase extended academic opportunities through enrolling them in various programs (Robotics Camp, College Orientation Visits, Early Reading Program) that will focus on Science, Reading and Math.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Summer Intersession, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $10,000; Title I, Part C: $15,000 (Robotics Camp, College Visits) Program agendas, lesson plans, monitoring visits, and sign-in sheets Improve report card grades and benchmark assessment results, increased participation in program activities Increase students passing rates in core content areas , student surveys Increase in state assessment scores in all content core subjects and student promotion and graduation rates.
1.1.17 Provide students with every opportunity to graduate on time by contracting with LUCHA transcript services to evaluate transcripts for immigrant students from Mexico to the United States entering a SISD high school for the first time. SPANTRAN will be contracted to evaluate transcripts for immigrant students coming to the District from countries other than Mexico. LUCHA and SPANTRAN will provide a Graduation Credit Analysis (GCA) to place students into proper grade level and core-content area courses.
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Chief Academic Officer; Guidance & Counseling Coordinator; Academic Compliance Officer Monthly Title I, Part A: $75,000 (LUCHA); Title I, Part A: $10,000 (SPANTRAN) LUCHA report on transcripts submitted for evaluation and Grade Credit Analysis received from LUCHA Grade and course placement of students Implementation of LUCHA and SPANTRAN requests and Graduation Credit Analysis Increased proper placement of immigrant students in grade and courses. Increased graduation rate with designated cohort
1.1.18 Purchase licenses for Unique Learning System in order to provide specialized interventions for Special Education students taking the STAAR-ALT.
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Director, Special Education Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $40,000 Lesson plan documentation, User log ins, observations during walk-throughs Instructional rounds data in specialized support classrooms: FLS, SLU, ILC, and some SCA, improvement on the STAAR-ALT Based on walk-throughs, ULS is being implemented in at least 75% of identified classrooms. 2% increase in the passing rate of Special Education students on the STAAR ALT test.
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.2 By the beginning of the 2013-2014 school year, SISD will implement and monitor programs and/or services to decrease the at-risk rate from 48% to 45%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.2.1 Utilize the S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit to provide academic support in the core content areas to At-Risk students. S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. (Socorro Offering Children Relevant And Technological Experiences in Science) will upgrade its computer laptops and software to provide direct, small group instruction to students at district campuses.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Weekly Title I, Part A: $2,000 S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S schedule, student sign-in sheets Increased student academic performance Student benchmark scores, student surveys, teacher surveys Student state assessment scores, student surveys, teacher surveys
1.2.2 Provide an alternative high school for students at risk of not graduating due to exit level state assessments, and/or lack of credits. Options High School serves as the District's credit recovery alternative high school.

TEC § 37.008
TEC § 29.081
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: $681,627 Personnel Action Forms, teacher duty schedules, signed job descriptions, student schedules Increased number of graduates Student rosters, student grades, student assessments Number of students graduating, number of credits earned by students, Student scores, Student state assessment scores
1.2.3 Provide a Disciplinary Alternative Education Program (DAEP). Keys Academy/Keys Elementary serve(s) as the district DAEP.

TEC § 37.008
TEC § 29.081
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs; Campus Principals Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: (72.50 FTEs) $1,835,723 Personnel Action Forms, teacher duty schedules, signed job descriptions, student schedules, purchase orders, contracts, timesheets Decreased number of behavior-related incidents at campuses, improved academic performance Attendance, number of placements per 9 weeks Yearly attendance, number of placements over course of year
1.2.4 Provide supplemental State Compensatory Education funded teaching positions to work with at-risk students.

TEC § 29.081
TEC § 42.152(c)

Includes:
ESL Teachers
Math Lab Teachers
Reading Teachers
Assessment Lab Teachers
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Assistant Superintendent, Elementary; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Director, State and Federal Programs Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: Supplemental Teachers (50 FTEs) $3,000,000 (27 5th grade teachers; 23 6th-12th teachers) Personnel Action Forms, teacher duty schedules, ARMS interventions, signed job descriptions, teacher schedules, student rosters Increased academic performance of at-risk students Failure reports, reading intervention plans Reduced failure rates, decrease in at-risk gap by grade level, grade level promotion
1.2.5 Implement the use of State Compensatory Education Intervention (SCEI) Coaches and Class Size Reduction Teachers to provide academic support services to at-risk students.

TEC § 29.081
FASRG 9.2.4.1
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs; School Improvement Officer; SCE Specialist, State and Federal Programs; Campus Principals Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCEI Coaches: SCE: (33 FTEs) $1,980,000; SCE (23 FTEs Secondary) $1,380,000 Class Size Reduction Teachers: SCE: (46 FTEs) $1,620,000 Personnel Action Forms, duty schedules, ARMS interventions, signed job descriptions, teacher schedules, student rosters Increased academic performance of targeted students Failure reports, reading intervention plans, timeline, checkpoints Reduced failure rates, decrease in at-risk gap by grade level
1.2.6 Provide intervention services for students enrolled in Compensatory Education Home Instruction (CEHI) and Pregnancy-related services program through supports provided by Homebound instructors.
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs; SCE Specialist, State and Federal Programs; School Improvement Officer; Director, Special Education Weekly SCE: $211,719 - contingent on 13-14 teacher schedules Teacher schedules for services provided to students, student rosters Student grades, grade level advancement Walk-throughs, number of students who transition back to school after homebound services Student state assessment data, drop-out data
1.2.7 Provide credit recovery programs, such as Compass Learning, that will allow at risk students the opportunity to graduate.
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Assistant Superintendent, Secondary Spring Semester, Fall Semester SCE: (4 FTEs) $189,141 Attendance and credit completion Attendance and credit completion Decreased at-risk percentages, higher graduation rates Reduction in drop out rates, improved attendance
1.2.8 Via the Elevate K12 Program, provide academic tutorial support in Reading and Math to struggling students from low performing campuses in preparation for the 2nd administration of STAAR.
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Elementary Education; School Improvement Officer; Instructional Officers Monthly SCE: $29,000 Sign-in sheets, attendance rosters, class schedules Improved classroom grades, pre and post tests Measurable student progress on Elevate K12 Measurable student progress on Elevate K12, improved state assessment scores
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.3 By Spring 2014, 90% of Pre-K through 3rd grade students will be at or above grade level upon transitioning to the next grade.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.3.1 Administer an Early Reading Assessment (iStation and Tango) and provide accelerated instruction to all PREK-3 students while progress monitoring all students within the 3-Tier Model.
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School Improvement Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $174,000.00 All elementary and K-8 campuses will administer a BOY/MOY/EOY reading assessments using iStation for all K-3rd students. CPALLS for Pre-K students. This assessment will be used to identify students in need of additional assistance based on a tiering process. The progress monitoring component is embedded into the iStation program and automatically rates students tier on a monthly basis. Pre-K students will be administered the CPALLs+ as their early reading assessment, with a beginning, middle and end-of-year assessment also completed. BOY/MOY and progress monitoring data EOY data
1.3.2 Administer an Early Math Assessment to all K-2 students within the 3-Tier Model and provide accelerated instruction.
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School Improvement Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $100,000 All elementary and K-8 campuses will administer a BOY/MOY math assessment using Taylor Made Math Assessment and Teacher Created Materials (TCM) assessments on Eduphoria or paper and pencil. Students in need of additional assistance were then addressed through a variety of resources to bridge the gap in mathematics. BOY/MOY early math assessment data EOY early math assessment data
1.3.3 Provide technical support for online use of Destination Reading district-wide. This reading program will facilitate student learning to make necessary gains in reading & math development.
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School Improvement Officer; Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Director, Special Education Monthly Title I, Part A: $13,368 Assessment scores ELL Student scores on measurable assessments will increase as evidence by increase in students BOY to EOY on iStation Assessment scores STAAR, EOC, and TELPAS
1.3.4 Provide supplementary resources to support Pre-K registration (print services).
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School Improvement Officer Spring Semester Title I, Part A: $6400 Purchase orders Increase of students registered in the Pre-K program Registration packets Increased Pre-K student enrollment
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.4 By Spring 2014, SISD will show a 10% increase as measured by TSI (Texas Success Initiative) in college/career readiness.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.4.1 Identify students for the Gifted and Talented program with a variety of instruments and procedures to measure diverse talents, abilities, and intelligences. Assess students in languages they understand or with non-verbal assessments.

August 30 - October 25, 2013
January 10 - March 7, 2014
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Chief Academic Officer; Advanced Academics Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT: $40,000 Number of students tested, student rosters, purchase orders Percentage of students qualifying for GT services GT identification assessments GT numbers reflected in PEIMS
1.4.2 Increase the number of students receiving industry-recognized certifications and dual/articulated credit by providing students with training using industry-standard curriculum equipment, technology, software, and supplies.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant: $222,110.90 Purchase orders, database of certifications Number of certificates received Increase in the number of course sections identified as Articulated or Dual Credit Increase in the total number of students who received articulated credit, dual credit, and industry certification
1.4.3 Provide a district-wide Career and Technology Education (CTE) counselor who will provide assistance in working with special populations, academic/CTE integration, and links to post-secondary CTE.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant: (FTE 1) $65,990.81 Employment of counselor, calendar, sign in sheets, special population enrollment in programs Percentage of student enrollment increase, improved performance on PBM (performance based monitoring) Meeting summaries Career Cruising reports, enrollment reports
1.4.4 Provide a Dual Credit EMT program (currently housed at Socorro High School).
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant: $27,648.00 Contract with EPCC, course sections, enrolled students Higher percentage rate of student receiving EMT certificate Program meetings Enrollment reports, student certifications
1.4.5 Maintain and improve educational achievement for Schaeffer House students by providing a full time teacher to offer GED course training and CTE courses. The improvement of educational achievement for Schaeffer House students also includes the purchase of supplies and materials. The instructor provides instruction, guidance, and leadership to the GED students of Schaeffer House as they complete their GED diplomas.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Career and Technical Education Daily, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part D: $25,000.00; Title I, Part D: (FTEs 0.5) $22,400 Teacher records, lesson plans, enrollment reports, Pre TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education), number of students completing GED Post TABE (Test for Adult Basic Education), number of students completing GED, promotion and retention reports Schaeffer House student grades, student rosters Schaeffer House student graduation rate, end of year student scores
1.4.6 Provide technology services to Schaeffer House students to complete GED graduation requirements and/or obtain employment after leaving the facility.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Technology Services Daily Title I, Part A: $3988.24 Purchase orders of internet service and computers Better scores and GED completion rate Schaeffer House student grades, student rosters Schaeffer House student graduation rate, end of year student scores
1.4.7 Identify, recruit, and provide services to migrant children and youth, including conducting annual residency verification and other identification and recruitment (ID&R) activities according to specific timelines, as outlined in the Texas Manual for the identification and Recruitment of Migrant Students. In addition, ensure migrant vans used for recruiting are adequately maintained and serviced.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Department of Transportation Weekly Title I Part C: $1,600.00 (migrant van maintenance) Work orders from the SISD Department of Transportation Improved academic acheivement of migrant students Student rosters, student grades Student state assessment grades, student graduation rates
1.4.8 Provide college, technical, and military academy postsecondary awareness opportunities through various means.
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Chief Academic Officer Spring Semester Title I, Part A: $5,700 Sign-in sheets Scholarship awards, national student clearing house data Attendance rosters from forums Reports of military and college acceptance, Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB) reports
1.4.9 Implement Generation Texas Week to focus on college ready activities appropriate for all grade levels.

(Preparing for College Forum, National Collegiate Forum, State Collegiate Forum, Regional Collegiate Forum, Alumni Collegiate Forum, Military Academy Collegiate Forum)

November 7, 2013; January 29, 2014; February 26, 2014; March 26, 2014
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Chief Academic Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $2,000 Campus activity log Student national clearinghouse data, scholarship awards Student attendance, student scholarship applications Student graduation rosters, scholarship awards
1.4.10 Provide college preparatory programs such as Advancement Via Individual Achievement (AVID) and SpringBoard in K-8, middle, and high school campuses in support of career/college readiness for students.
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Chief Academic Officer Daily Title I, Part A: $11,040; High School Allottment: approximately $500,000 from pertinent campus budgets (District - $12,000) Walk-throughs, AVID certification National student clearinghouse data, scholarship awards AVID reports, Pre-AP reports Advanced course completion reports, AVID reports, AEIS report
1.4.11 Provide software upgrades for Read 180 and materials for all teachers and reading programs in order to support and enhance student reading performance district-wide.
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Chief Academic Officer; Director, Technology Services 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $100,000 Purchase orders for software upgrades and materials Improved scores through Read 180 Improved middle of year reading assessment scores Improved end of year reading assessment scores, elevated student exit level exams
1.4.12 Acquire and utilize portable tablet hardware and compatible software to provide direct instruction to students in core subject areas and to collect, manage and analyze data to enhance teaching.
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Assistant Superintendent, Elementary; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester State reserved technology funds: $300,000; Competitive Internal Grant Purchase orders Increased student achievement in core subject areas Middle of year student scores percentage increase, state/grades assessment End of year student scores percentage increase, state/grades assessment
1.4.13 Implement the use of the GEAR UP-SOAR program to continue supporting its 9th grade cohort towards achieving postsecondary goals.
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary Education; Campus Administrators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GEAR UP-SOAR Grant: $500 Student cohort roster, grant documentation Enhanced student content area grades and state standardized test scores 3% increase in middle of year content area grades 5% increase in the end of year state standardized test scores
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.5 For the 2013-2014 school year, 100% of SISD campuses will have specific programs and/or presentations in place to continue to promote safe and drug free schools and communities.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.5.1 Provide materials/resources to support campuses implementing the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, the Connecting With Kids Program, and the Law Enforcement Operations for Safety (LEOS) Program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Chief of Police Services Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $69,000 (Olweus); Title I, Part A: $3,500 (LEOS) Coordinating Committee workbook, progress reports 1-3, campus walkthroughs-teacher observations, campus coordinator meeting sign-in sheets Olweus Bullying Prevention Program questionnaire, PEIMS Olweus Bullying Prevention Program questionnaire, PEIMS, number of reported bullying incidents, student/teacher surveys Olweus Bullying Prevention Program questionnaire, PEIMS report-decreased number of bullying incidents
1.5.2 The Department of Police Services will provide progressive presentations to students and staff.
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Chief of Police Services Monthly Title I, Part A: $1,000 Presentation agendas and sign in sheets Number of presentations, decreased number of district-wide incidents Increase in student and staff presentation participation, 2% decrease in mid year incidents Increase in number of presentations, 3% decrease in number of related incidents
1.5.3 Increase Emergency Operation Procedure (EOP) presentations and campus audits conducted by the Department of Police Services.
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Chief of Police Services Monthly Title I, Part A: $500 (Print Shop) EOP Training sign in sheets, campus safety audit reports Code Blue drills (2 per year), staff evaluations Compare number of trained students and staff members Increase the number of trained staff and students in emergency situations
1.5.4 The Department of Guidance and Counseling will provide guidance lessons to students addressing student competencies and character education training.
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Chief Academic Officer; Guidance & Counseling Coordinator Weekly Title I, Part A: $1,923 Guidance lessons, classroom rosters, lesson plans Number of lessons, number of campus referrals District and campus incident reports End of year district and campus incident reports
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.6 For the 2013-2014 school year, SISD will increase services from five stage 1 SIP campuses to eight campuses that failed to meet previous Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) requirements. (AP)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.6.1 Provide transportation services to students attending a campus other than their home campus due to SIP Stage 1 status. These are students whose parents have exercised the school choice option.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Department of Transportation Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A SIP: $481,219 Bus requests, Transportation bus routes Shift of resources for students attending another campus, student rosters indicating student movement to other campuses. Increase in the availability of transportation services for students whose parents have exercised the school choice option. Grades and test results of students who have shifted to another campus, indicating no negative impact.
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.7 By the end of the 2014 school year, SISD student Reading scores on the STAAR test for English Language Learners (ELL) will increase from 79% to 81%, in order to meet System Safeguard requirements. (AP)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.7.1 Provide scientifically research based supplemental resources, equipment and materials for instruction and/or intervention in the entire core curriculum. (specifically reiterated for Reading curriculum in this objective)

This is a delineation of strategy 1.1.1, restated in this objective to address AYP for ELL students.

(AP)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Every 9 weeks Title III, LEP Part A: $10,000 / Bilingual Education: $15,000 Purchase orders, sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates/copies, materials Sign-in sheets, agendas, evaluations, walkthroughs, increase in LEP scores in the area of reading Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance, benchmark scores End of year student LEP scores increase by 2% points overall in reading
1.7.2 Utilize technology resources, such as iPads, Nooks and laptops to provide opportunities for additional academic support for LEP students.
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Every 9 weeks Title III, LEP Part A: $70,000 Purchase orders (apps), sign-in sheets of trainings, agendas, training dates/copies, materials Sign-in sheets, agendas, evaluations, walkthroughs, increase in LEP scores in the area of reading Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance, benchmark scores End of year student LEP scores increase by 2% points overall in reading
1.7.3 Provide a part-time temporary instructional aide (TIA) that will assist with small group instruction, guidance and targeted assistance for all LEP students. (specifically iterated for Reading curriculum in this objective)

(AP)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Weekly Title III, LEP: 56 (0.5 FTEs) $668,000 Weekly logs submitted by TIAs, timesheets, payroll TIAs receive monthly training on how to assist students, sign-in sheets, agendas and walkthrough’s and campus visits Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance End of year scores to include student grades and state assessments, scores in reading will increase 2% points overall for LEP students
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.8 By the end of the 2014 school year, SISD student Math scores on the STAAR test for English Language Learners (ELL) will increase from 81% to 83%, in order to meet System Safeguard requirements. (AP)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.8.1 Provide scientifically research-based supplemental resources, equipment and materials for instruction and/or intervention in the entire core curriculum. (specifically reiterated for Math curriculum in this objective)

This is a delineation of strategy 1.1.1, restated in this objective to address AYP for ELL students.

(AP)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Every 9 weeks Refer to budget in strategy 1.7.1 (Title III, LEP Part A:$10,000 / Bilingual: $15,000) Purchase orders, sign-in sheets, agendas, training dates/copies, materials Sign-in sheets, agendas, evaluations, walkthroughs, increase in LEP scores in the area of math Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance, benchmark scores, benchmark scores End of year student LEP scores increase by 2% points overall in math
1.8.2 Utilize technology resources, such as IPads, Nooks and laptops to provide opportunities for additional academic support for LEP students.
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Every 9 weeks Refer to budget in strategy 1.7.2 (Title III, LEP Part A: $70,000) Purchase orders of applications, sign-in sheets of trainings, agendas, training dates/copies, materials Sign-in sheets, agendas, evaluations, walkthroughs, increase in LEP scores in the area of math Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance, benchmark scores End of year student LEP scores increase by 2% points overall in math
1.8.3 Develop and implement summer and intersession intervention tutorials for services to students in need of academic support.

This is a delineation of strategy 1.1.2, restated in this objective to address AYP for ELL students.

(AP)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL; Assistant Superintendent, Elementary; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Campus Administrators Saturdays, Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Summer Intersession Refer to budget in strategy 1.1.2 (Campus Bilingual Funds / SCE) Teacher sign-in sheets, teacher lesson plans, student rosters Improved academic performance of students attending tutorials Increased student scores and performance in the all areas; with particularity in math End of year student LEP scores increase by 2% points overall in reading and 2% points overall in math
1.8.4 Provide a part-time temporary instructional aide (TIA) that will assist with small group instruction, guidance and targeted assistance for all LEP students (specifically iterated for Math curriculum in this objective)

(AP)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Weekly Refer to budget in strategy 1.7.4 (Title III, LEP Part A: $668,000 56 0.5 FTEs) TIAs receive monthly training on how to assist students, sign-in sheets, agendas, walkthrough’s and campus visitstimes,heets, payroll , Weekly logs submitted by TIAs Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance End of year scores to include student grades and state assessments, scores in reading will increase 2% points overall for LEP students and math 2% points overall
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.9 By the end of the 2014 school year, SISD Reading scores on the STAAR test for Special Education students will increase from 70% to 73%, in order to meet System Safeguard requirements. (AP)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.9.1 Purchase and implement the district-wide use of the Lexia Program.

(AP)
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Director, Special Education Weekly General Funds: $30,000 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets Lexia data logs, improved student academic performance on grades and tests Increased usage according to Fall Lexia Data Logs, 2% increase in the mid-year scores of Special Education students Increased usage according to Spring Lexia Data Logs, increased passing rates of Special Education students on state standardized tests
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.10 By the end of the 2014 school year, SISD Math scores on the STAAR test for Special Education students will increase from 66% to 69%, in order to meet System Safeguard requirements. (AP)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.10.1 Provide prescriptive Math interventions (such as Compass Learning) and monitoring for identified students based on math test data.

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Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Campus Principals Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $500 Documented interventions Increase in Special Education Math scores Mid-year increase in Math classroom scores End-of-year increase in Math scores on state assessments
Goal 1 SISD will increase student performance in all assessed areas to ensure that they are provided the opportunity to graduate college and career ready.
Objective 1.11 By the end of the 2014 school year, SISD Math scores on the STAAR test for African-American students will increase from 78% to 80%, in order to meet System Safeguard requirements. (AP)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
1.11.1 Provide prescriptive interventions and monitoring for identified students based on math STAAR test data and common assessments.
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Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; Campus Principals Every 9 weeks Title I Part A: $500 Campus student accountability folders Change in African American population scores Mid-year increase in math classroom scores End-of-year increase in math scores on state assessments

Goal 2 SISD will provide services and benefits to attract, retain, and offer growth opportunities for highly qualified staff.
Objective 2.1 For the 2013-2014 school year, SISD will continue to attract and retain 100% highly qualified staff.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.1.1 Provide initial and follow-up training to all SISD school campuses in the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program to include providing supplies, materials, refreshments, and snacks.

This will occur 1 to 4 times during each semester.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $2000 Sign-in sheets, P.O.s for materials, agendas Decrease in discipline referrals, higher attendance rate, Improved student performance Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Questionnaire, PEIMS data, mid-year decrease in bullying related referrals Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Questionnaire, PEIMS data, end-of-year decrease in bullying related referrals
2.1.2 Provide local staff development that will support instruction in Career and Technical Education teachers’ program areas.

(TQ)
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant:$18,198.25 Sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Higher attendance rate, Improved student performance Teacher staff development assessment Teacher plan for program improvement, teacher online program evaluation
2.1.3 Provide professional development opportunities to campus teachers; Parent Liaisons; to Title I and Special Education Aides; to SCE funded personnel such as the SCE Instructional Specialist, SCE Intervention Coaches, Summer/Intersession Teachers, At-Risk and Library Aides, and all Social Workers in order to enhance the academic support services for at-risk students to include providing supplies, materials, refreshments, and snacks. Sessions will include "Sensitivity" training for district personnel pertaining to the instruction of special student populations.

Parent Liaisons:
July 26, 2013; November 15, 2013; April 10, 2014

Instructional Aides:
Oct. 14-16 2013 Nancy Toner; Jan. 21-22 2014 SIOP

"Sensitivity" Training Sessions: April & June 2014

TEC § 29.081
Financial Accountability Systems Resource Guide (FASRG) Section 9.2.3
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Chief Financial Officer, Financial Services; Director, State and Federal Programs; Staff Accountant, State and Federal Programs; Campus Principals; School Improvement Officer; Coordinator, Library Services Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $235,000; SCE: $175,000 Personnel Action Forms, duty schedules, signed job descriptions, teacher schedules, student rosters, sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Improved student performance, ARMS interventions Increased mid-year academic performance of students to include class grades and benchmark scores Increased end-of-year academic performance of students to include class grades, benchmark scores, state assessment scores
2.1.4 Ensure that special education administrative costs, including equipment, printing, postage, part-time pay, supplies, furniture, various fees(to include publishing fees) are incurred to support staff in their responsibilities.
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Director, Special Education Weekly Special Education: $10,000 sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Improved student performance Mid-Year Review of Expenditures Final Expenditure Reports
2.1.5 Provide professional development and resources related to Dr. Marcia L. Tate and the 20 instructional strategies that engage the brain across the content areas.
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Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; School Improvement Officer Fall Semester Title II, Part A: $152,000 Sign-in sheets and agendas Improved teaching practices, increased student performance Observations of application of new knowledge and skills Student performance will increase on local and state assessment scores
2.1.6 Provide targeted professional development and resources throughout the Spring semester up to STAAR first and second administrations.
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School Improvement Officer Spring Semester Title II, Part A: $50,000 Sign-in sheets and agendas for specific teachers and campuses Improved teaching practices coupled with increased student performance Observations of application of new knowledge and skills Student performance will increase on local and state assessment scores
Goal 2 SISD will provide services and benefits to attract, retain, and offer growth opportunities for highly qualified staff.
Objective 2.2 For the 2013-2014 school year, the percentage of district and campus personnel attending professional development, conferences, and/or management institutes will increase by 8% over the 2012-2013 school year.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.2.1 Provide professional development in an array of mediums: interactive workshops, online activities (to include PDAS training and "Prioritizing Subpopulation Assignments" for campus administrators, counselors, curriculum specialists, and teachers), newsletters, mentoring, coaching, classroom observations, model lessons, etc.
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary; District and Campus Instructional Officers; SCE Instructional Content Coaches; Title II Facilitators; School Improvement Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $200,000; Title II, Part A: $700,000 (salaries); Title II, Part A: $11,860 (PDAS training); Title II, Part A: $21,200 (Prioritizing Subpopulation Assignments); SCE: $18,000 (extra duty pay) Campus and district calendars, sign-in sheets, agendas Increased student performance, better placement of English Language Learners (ELL) and Special Education students. Observations of application of new knowledge and skills, improved classroom grades Improved benchmark test results, improved state assessment scores
2.2.2 Provide training and support of English Language Proficiency Standards (ELPS) to all content teachers to increase overall student passing rates for ELL's served, denials, and exited students.
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Director, Bilingual Education/ESL Monthly Title III, LEP: $20,000 Campus and district calendars, sign-in sheets, agendas Increased student performance Classroom walk-throughs, lesson planning Student performance will increase on state assessment scores
2.2.3 Increase the number of instructional facilitators, instructional coaches, teachers, administrators, support staff, and SCE coaches, campus based dyslexia providers, and counselors that receive Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol training (SIOP), Response to Intervention (RtI), At-Risk, and other differentiated approaches to instruction support and provide follow-up support with the emphasis on differentiated instruction specific to student needs.

RtI training will also take place during the Summer of 2014 and will include the provision of materials and extra duty pay out of Title II funds.
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Chief Academic Officer; School Improvement Officer; Director, Career and Technical Education; Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Special Education; Director, Bilingual/ESL Education Weekly, Monthly Title III, LEP: $30,000; SCE: $25,000; Title II: $100,000 (Summer 2014) Sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Higher student attendance rate, increased student performance Class walk-throughs, lesson planning Student performance will increase on state assessment scores
2.2.4 Provide a district Trainer of Trainers (TOT) for Sheltered Instruction Observation Protocol (SIOP) through district coaches or campus personnel as designated by campus principal.

Classroom teachers will also receive sheltered instruction training and a SIOP book to further develop professional development to support ELL students.
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Director, Bilingual Education/ESL; Campus Administrators; SCEI Coaches Fall Semester Title III, LEP: $30,000; Title II, $20,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, campus and district calendars Higher attendance rate, increased student performance Classroom walk-throughs, lesson planning Student performance will increase on state assessment scores
2.2.5 Provide a committee of SISD staff members that will revise written policies on student identification for Gifted and Talented student services and that will submit new policies for approval by the district board of trustees. Once approved, the policies are disseminated to all parents (19 TAC 89.1).
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Chief Academic Officer; Advanced Academics Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT: $5,330.00 Sign-in sheets, agendas, campus, and district calendars Higher attendance rate, increased student performance Updated GT rosters GT Identifications and numbers in PEIMS
2.2.6 Ensure a minimum of (30) clock hours of professional development that meets the criteria in the Texas State Plan for the Education of Gifted and Talented students for teachers who provide instruction and services that are part of the district's defined GT services (19 TAC 89.2(1))

Courses offered July 2013, October 2013, March 2014, and online.
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Chief Academic Officer; Advanced Academics Coordinators Fall Intersession, Spring Intersession, Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT: $7,500.00 Meeting notes, agenda, GT plan, parent meetings Increase in GT certifications and improved student program services. Staff development evaluations Total number of GT certifications
2.2.7 Provide a minimum of (6) hours of annual professional development to teachers who provide instruction and services to GT students that is related to state teacher education standards (19 TAC 89.2(3) and TAC 233.1)
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Chief Academic Officer; Advanced Academics Coordinators Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT: $59,000.00 GT calendar, Passport to Excellence, agendas, sign-in sheets, campus initiated trainings Improved services provided for students, increased GT certifications Staff Development Evaluations GT certifications
2.2.8 Provide opportunities for teachers to attend Career and Technical Education-associated staff development out of town to support instruction in teachers' program area.
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant: $66,710.00 Conference registration, agendas, sign-in sheets Increase in number of student certifications, increase number of CTE students enrollments and post secondary education Teacher staff development assessment Teacher plan for program improvement, teacher online program evaluation
2.2.9 Provide extra duty pay, travel funds for special education personnel for tutorials and professional development.
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Director, Special Education Weekly Special Education: $25,000 Extra duty pay forms, sign-in sheets, agenda, state and national conferences, tutorials, and professional development Evaluations, increased student performance for special education students. Benchmarks, Released state assessment Final state assessment scores
2.2.10 Increase teacher awareness of at-risk criteria through trainings on State Compensatory Education guidelines (including LPAC), provide staff development on intervention strategies and Eduphoria awareness through monthly student support team campus visits.
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Director, Career and Technical Education; School Improvement Officer; Director, Special Education; Director, Bilingual Education/ESL; Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly SCE: $15,000 (extra duty pay) Extra duty pay forms, sign-in sheets, agendas, state and national conferences, tutorials, and professional development Evaluations, increased student performance for special education students Middle of year student, teacher, and administrator surveys End of year student, teacher, and administrator surveys
2.2.11 Provide staff awareness trainings to district personnel to include classroom teachers on the issues surrounding homelessness.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $200 Sign-in sheets, agenda, conferences, professional development Evaluations, turn-around trainings Enhanced monitoring of report grades and benchmark assessments Increase in state assessment scores results by 4% in all core content areas
2.2.12 Attend state and/or national conferences such as, but not limited to the Association for Compensatory Educators of Texas (ACET), Olweus Trainings, Association for Migrant Educators of Texas (AMET), National Association of State Directors of Migrant Education (NASDME), and others that address state and/or federal compliance issues.

Oct. 29-30 2013 (ACET)
Jan. 7-9 / 29-30 2014 (Olweus)
April 6-9 2014 (NASDME)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $5,000 Sign-in sheets, agenda, conferences, professional development Evaluations, turn-around trainings and provide agendas and sign-in sheets Enhanced monitoring of compliance issues Broadened support to campuses through program compliance
2.2.13 Increase the number of GREAT certified Police Officers, resulting in a greater number of GREAT certified students.
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Chief of Police Services; Director, State and Federal Programs 4th 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $3,700 Attend conference for training Increased number of GREAT certified officers. Increased number of GREAT certified students. Set and compare baseline for number of presentations Increased number of GREAT Presentations, reduced number of gang related incidents
2.2.14 Provide training and support for the Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) and SpringBoard college and career readiness systems.
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Chief Academic Officer; Director, State and Federal Programs; Advanced Academics Coordinators Fall Semester, 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $150,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, conferences, and professional development Maintain 100% of AVID students’ college acceptance, increased college readiness Staff development evaluations Total number of AVID campuses receiving certified status, Total number of campuses implementing SpringBoard curriculum.
2.2.15 Provide opportunities for district personnel to become members of organizations/coalitions that support the district's Homeless Education Program.
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Director, State and Federal Programs 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $100 Conference information, teacher schedules, student rosters, and services provided Increased number of homeless students passing all areas of state assessment Agency contacts for services Increased numbers of students receiving support from El Paso area agencies that provide services for the homeless
2.2.16 Update Special Education assessments and ARD/IEP software and training to increase accuracy and data collection for student performance in all core content areas.
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Director, Special Education Daily Special Education: $25,000 Training rosters, updated software Change in student content area scores Improved student scores on benchmarks and classroom grades Improved end-of-year student scores and improved state assessment scores
2.2.17 Provide district-wide CTE teachers, counselors, and administrators, with training opportunities to provide enriched CTE opportunities for students.

(Summer: June-July; Spring: January-February)
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant: $80,000 Sign-in sheets, trip requests, registration Increase of enrollment of coherent sequence courses Spring session rosters, agendas, and plans Summer session rosters, agendas, and plans
Goal 2 SISD will provide services and benefits to attract, retain, and offer growth opportunities for highly qualified staff.
Objective 2.3 For the 2013-2014 school year, SISD will provide opportunities for district personnel to purchase scientifically research-based programs, materials, and/or resources for professional development training in order to decrease the number of schools in Stage 1 Year 1 SIP from 5 to 0.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.3.1 Provide staff development to district-level personnel and teachers in order to integrate technology in all aspects of curriculum through the use of mobile wireless labs, iPads, Nooks, and e-books.
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Director, Bilingual Education/ESL Monthly Title III, LEP: $10,000; Title III, LEP $46,000 (e-books) Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System, State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness, and End of Course scores Increased student performance in local and state assessments and increase in student attainment and progress in English proficiency Benchmarks, Student English Language Proficiencey testing, classroom observations, ESL academies State assessment scores, Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System, Student English Language Proficiency.
Goal 2 SISD will provide services and benefits to attract, retain, and offer growth opportunities for highly qualified staff.
Objective 2.4 For the 2013-2014 school year, SISD will utilize not less than 10% of its Title I, Part A entitlement on professional development for stakeholders in order to meet System Safeguard requirements by 2014. (PD)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
2.4.1 Provide Writing Workshop sessions to teachers at both the elementary and secondary levels to address:
-STAAR/End-of-Course ELAR Literacy
-the integration of Reading and Writing
-horizontal and vertical content and pedagogical alignment
-writing academies for high school teachers and students

(PD, TQ)
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Chief Academic Officer; Assistant Superintendent, Elementary; Assistant Superintendent, Secondary Monthly Title I, Part A: $25,000; Title II: $15,000 Agendas, Sign-in sheets, purchase orders Measurable increase in student performance on standardized Reading and Writing tests Mid-year increase in the Reading and Writing scores of students as reflected in classroom grades and tests End-of-year increase in the Reading and Writing scores of students as reflected in classroom grades, classroom tests, and standardized tests
2.4.2 Provide scientifically research-based training in the area of sheltered instruction for teachers and administrators to include the use of an online system to measure effectiveness of implementation in the classroom.

(PD, LE, TQ)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL; Campus Principals; Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly Title I, Part A: $230,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials Increase in student performance in all content areas Progress monitoring every 3, 6, 9 weeks of student performance End of year scores to include student grades and state assessments, scores in reading will increase 2% points overall for LEP students and math 2% points overall
2.4.3 Provide training workshops to teachers and campus staff in the Latino Family Literacy Project to work with Latino parents and their children in building a regular reading routing and strong English-language skills.

Training held in August/September. Sessions are held a minimum of once per week per campus. Elementary sessions are 10 weeks; secondary sessions are 6 weeks. Each campus has a weekly calendar.

(PD, LE, TQ)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL; Director, State and Federal Programs Weekly Title I, Part A: $150,000 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, attendee rosters, purchase orders Increase in the academic performance of Latino students Progress monitoring, 3,6,9 weeks assessments, benchmark scores End of year student LEP scores increase by 2% points overall in reading
2.4.4 Implement training for Socorro Career and Technical Education (CTE) teachers on strategies for reading/writing to align ELAR standards with CTE standards.

Trainings include:
-1 Day – STAAR Overview; Getting to Know your TEKS-Unpacking the TEKS; 2-3- Strategies/Activities
-½ Day Writing Strategies/Activities
-½ Day Depth of Knowledge (Questioning Strategies)
-½ Day Comprehension Strategies/Activates

(PD, TQ)
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Director, Career and Technical Education Spring Semester, Fall Semester Carl Perkins Grant: $6500 Sign-in sheets, attendee rosters, agendas, purchase orders Change in overall academic performance of CTE students Mid-year increase in the classroom grades of CTE students Increase in the passing rate of CTE students with regard to End of Course and standardized tests
2.4.5 Implement a training and monitoring system for campus administrators and teachers in the instructional models provided by Stetson and Associates in order to bolster the academic performance of Special Education students. These models include:

-Adequate Yearly Progress: 23 Strategies for Improving AYP Status for Students with Disabilities
-Step by Step for Inclusive Schools for AYP Instructional Strategies and Inclusion to Support Students with Disabilities

(PD, LE, TQ)
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Director, Special Education; Director, State and Federal Programs; Campus Principals Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $350,000 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, purchase orders, monthly assessment meeting minutes, AYP worksheets for campuses Instructional rounds data, 2012-2013 staffing data, improvement in academic performance of Special Education students for teachers who have received training 2% overall increase in the reading and math scores of Special Education students Overall increase in the passing rate of Special Education students on state standardized tests
2.4.6 Provide staff development to teachers on the use of Unique Learning System (ULS) to bolster the academic progress of STAAR-ALT Special Education students.
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Director, Special Education Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $40,000 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, purchase orders Instructional rounds data in specialized support classrooms: FLS, SLU, ILC, and some SCA, lesson plan documentation, the number of user log ins, improvement on the STAAR -ALT Based on walk-throughs, ULS is being implemented in at least 75% of identified classrooms. 2% increase in the passing rate of Special Education students on the STAAR ALT test.

Goal 3 SISD will promote and support active parent and community engagement in the education process to improve student achievement.
Objective 3.1 By the end of the 2013-2014 academic year, SISD will increase its training, enrichment, and educational involvement opportunities by 5% for parents and community members to improve student academic performance.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.1.1 Provide registration costs for parents to attend workshops and trainings.
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Director, Special Education; Director, Bilingual/ESL; Director, Career and Technical Education; Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III, LEP: $1,000; Special Education: $7,000; Title I, Part A: $500; Title I, Part C: $1000 Purchase orders, attendee rosters, event materials Increased parent and community attendance of particular events Mid year tally of events and attendance End of year tally of events and attendance
3.1.2 Provide transportation and travel costs for parents of students served by the Department of Special Education.
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Director, Special Education Daily Special Education: $2,000 Travel Documentation, detailed travel requests Random survey of parents Mid-year increase in number of parents served Increase in positive comments on parent survey
3.1.3 Provide supplies and materials for parents of students served by the Department of Special Education.
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Director, Special Education Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Special Education: $2,000 Purchase orders Parent surveys Mid-year increase in number of parents served Increase in positive comments on parent survey
3.1.4 Utilize the S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. Mobile Unit to provide educational enrichment activities to parents of students. S.O.C.R.A.T.E.S. (Socorro Offering Children Relevant And Technological Experiences in Science) will upgrade computer laptops and software to provide technology-related learning experiences to parents at district campuses.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Weekly Title I, Part A: $2000 Posters, flyers, and advertisements at district campuses Parent workshop schedules, parent sign-in sheets Increase in number of parents participating in workshops, number of parent workshops offered, increase in student academic performance mid-year Increase in total number of parents participating in workshops at participating campuses, number of workshops offered, increase in student end of year academic performance and state test scores
3.1.5 Provide training to district personnel on the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act Parental Rights and Awareness.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $500 Flyers, agendas Sign-in sheets Improved report card grades and benchmark scores Increase in state assessment scores results by 4% in all core content areas
3.1.6 Fund a Title I Parent Liaison at each SISD campus to build capacity. Responsibilities include facilitating and offering parent workshop opportunities at least twice a month to bolster parent involvement in order to increase student academic performance. (SC)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Daily, Weekly, Monthly Title I, Part A: (1 FTE per campus) $16,000 Title I Parent Liaison employment documentation; workshop posters, flyers, and web notices Workshop agendas, sign-in sheets, and other evidence of parent participation Student, parent, and teacher surveys Workshop evaluations, parental involvement event documentation
3.1.7 Purchase and implement scientifically research-based programs, materials, books, and other resources in support of Parent Liaison activities meant to increase campus parental involvement.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $20,000 Purchase orders, Parent rosters, Parent workshop schedules Parent workshop agendas, sign-in sheets, Parent workshop products. Parent and teacher surveys. Workshop evaluations Parent and teacher surveys. Workshop evaluations
3.1.8 Provide Parent Liaisons with professional development training to promote and increase parental involvement. Include costs for generating hard copies of the district parental involvement policies for distribution to campus parents.

July 26, 2013; November 15, 2013; April 10, 2014.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $8,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, hard copies of policies, receipts Sign-in sheets, evidence of increased attendance Sign-in sheets End-of-year compliance reports for each campus
3.1.9 Provide informational meetings to Migrant Education Program (MEP) parents on how to access resources that are appropriate for timely, at-home, interventions for their children. Provide materials and resources to parents who speak little or no English to assist in eliminating the language barrier to communication between school and home in ensuring student academic success. Provide light snacks at evening meetings to ensure increased attendance.
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Director, State and Federal Programs Monthly, Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part C: $500.00 Sign-in sheets, agendas, progress reports At-Risk Management System reports, progress reports, report cards, recruiter's daily log Presentation evaluations, parent surveys Presentation evaluations, parent surveys
3.1.10 Host a father/son conference and a mother/daughter conference in order to bolster student achievement to include providing supplies, materials, refreshments, and snacks.

September 28, 2013; January 25, 2013 respectively.

(FCE, SC)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $15,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas Improved student scores for participants Registration list for evidence of participation Evaluations, end of year total participation
3.1.11 Provide funds to Private Nonprofit schools to support equitable parental involvement activities for parents of SISD Title I eligible students.
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Director, State and Federal Programs 1st 9-weeks Title I, Part A: $300 Agendas, purchase orders Sign-in sheets Increase in number of parents attending meetings/trainings Improved student performance
3.1.12 Provide maintenance and materials funding for the P.R.I.C.E. Mobile Unit utilized by the Department of Police Services for their community outreach endeavors. (People Responding to Innovative and Creative Education)
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Chief of Police Services Monthly Title I, Part A: $1,500 Requisition documentation, purchase orders P.R.I.C.E. Mobile Unit presentation agendas, sign-in sheets, and events schedule Set and compare benchmarks for number of P.R.I.C.E. participation events End of year increase in community and parent involvement as reflected on event sign-in sheets
3.1.13 Provide personnel funding for the Department of Police Services to increase community relation efforts through the inclusion of the P.R.I.C.E. Mobile Unit in designated events. (People Responding to Innovative and Creative Education)

Events vary year to year.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Chief of Police Services Every 9 weeks Title I, Part A: $1,000 Event sign in sheets, agendas, and promotional posters. (Health Fairs, career Days, Child Finger Printing events) Community Involvement in P.R.I.C.E. related functions, follow up requests for P.R.I.C.E. participation Set and compare benchmarks for number of P.R.I.C.E. participation events End of year increase in community and parent involvement as reflected on event sign-in sheets
Goal 3 SISD will promote and support active parent and community engagement in the education process to improve student achievement.
Objective 3.2 By the end of the 2013-2014 academic year, SISD will increase the average parental attendance at campus/district trainings and/or workshops to improve student academic performance in all state assessed content areas by 3%.
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.2.1 Ensure that parents of GT students are informed of all gifted and talented services and opportunities via various media (19 TAC 89.3).
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Chief Academic Officer Spring Semester, Fall Semester GT: $1200 Copies of notifications Sign-in sheets, event agendas Increased attendance of GT parents at GT school events Increased attendance of GT parents at GT school events over the course of the year
3.2.2 Inform parents and community stakeholders of federally funded programs at an annual public meeting.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Director, Bilingual/ESL Education; Director, Special Education; School Improvement Officer Spring Semester Title I, Part A: $600.00 Notification in West Texas County Courier, SISD Website Publication, Agenda, sign-in sheets Increased awareness of budget amongst parents and community. Parent and community evaluation after meeting Parent and community evaluation after meeting
3.2.3 Provide support through targeted training to parents of students experiencing homelessness that are part of the M-V TEXSHEP grant.
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Homeless Liaison, State and Federal Programs Spring Semester TEXSHEP Grant: $5,060 Purchase orders for training materials Sign-in sheets, agendas, training materials Increased parent participation Sign-in sheets, evaluations
3.2.4 Implement the Annual James Butler Games Event, including a community run/walk fundraiser for the James Butler Games Scholarship Fund. Timeline pertains to monthly meetings for planning and funding pertains to refreshments, snacks, and flyers.

(FCE)
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Director, Special Education Spring Semester Special Education: $200 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, publications attendance data Parent interest survey Impact survey
Goal 3 SISD will promote and support active parent and community engagement in the education process to improve student achievement.
Objective 3.3 For the 2013-2014 school year, 100% of parents with students at SISD campuses identified as School Improvement Program Stage I status will receive notification of the school's status and its actions to meet previous AYP requirements. (PCE)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.3.1 Send notifications to parents of students at SISD campuses identified as School Improvement Program Stage I status of their school choice option. Information sent will include a breakdown of AYP itself and what steps the campus will take to meet AYP.

(N/A due to USDE waiver)
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N/A due to USDE waiver Fall Semester N/A due to USDE waiver N/A due to USDE waiver N/A due to USDE waiver N/A due to USDE waiver N/A due to USDE waiver
Goal 3 SISD will promote and support active parent and community engagement in the education process to improve student achievement.
Objective 3.4 For the 2013-2014 school year, the District will increase Parent and Community Engagement outreach and services in order to decrease the number of Stage 1 SIP campuses from 5 to 0. (PCE)
Title I Part A
School-Wide
Components
1. Is it in your CNA? 2. Is it School-wide Reform? 3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers? 4. Professional Development? 5. Attract, Retain Highly Qualified Teachers?
6. Parental Involvement? 7. PreK/K Transition? 8. Teacher Involvement in Assessment? 9. Timely Assistance for Students? 10. Coordinate & Integrate Federal, State & Local Programs?
  Strategy/Activity Components Person(s) Responsible Timeline Funding Source: Budget/FTE(s) Evidence of Implementation Evidence of Impact Formative Assessment Summative Assessment
3.4.1 Provide brochures and posters to campus commitees to communicate with parents and community members regarding the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program and how it is being used to both diminish the incidence of bullying and improve school climate. (FCE, SC)
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Director, State and Federal Programs Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1000 Purchase orders, Actual brochures and posters, student survey results, attendance rates Measureable increase in the number of students who report feeling safe at school on surveys, increase in attendance rate 2% increase in the number of students who report feeling safe at school on surveys 3% increase in the number of students who report feeling save at school on surveys
3.4.2 Purchase books, materials, and reporting services (K-12 Alerts) for parents to encourage anti-bullying and incident reporting as defined by the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program and the Law Enforcement Operation for Safety (LEOS) Program. (FCE, SC)
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Director, State and Federal Programs; Chief of Police Services Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title I, Part A: $1200 (Olweus); Title I, Part A: $11,700 (K-12 Alerts); Title I, Part A: $3500 Purchase orders, books Measurable decrease in the number of bullying-related incidents at campuses, measurable increase in student attendance rates 2% decrease in overall bullying-related incidents 3% decrease in overall bullying-related incidents
3.4.3 Provide opportunities for parents, through the Latino Family Literacy Project, to build a regular family reading routine and develop strong English-language skills with their children grades Pre-K-12. This strategy is for snacks and refreshments.

Training held in August/September. Sessions are held a minimum of once per week per campus. Elementary sessions are 10 weeks; secondary sessions are 6 weeks. Each campus has a weekly calendar.

(FCE, SC)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL; Director, State and Federal Programs Weekly Title I, Part A: $500 (tied to $150,000 from strategy 2.4.3) Sign-in sheets, agendas, purchase orders Parent workshop agendas, materials/books utilized by parents, improved parent participation and literacy, family albums created by participants Parent surveys, family albums Increase in student overall performance for LEP students, increase in parents attending events
3.4.4 Provide parents of Bilingual students in grades 3-5 an opportunity to reinforce skills taught in the classroom in their home environment through the Backpack Initiative in preparation for state assessments. (FCE)
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Director, Bilingual Education / ESL Spring Semester, Fall Semester Title III, LEP Part A: $85,000 Sign-in sheets, agendas, materials Increase in parental participation, increase in student performance Weekly usage reports, progress monitoring of student performance Parent surveys, increase in student performance in the areas of math and reading
3.4.5 Create and support the activities of a Parent Advisory Committee specifically for the area of Special Education. Funding is for refreshments and snacks. (PCE, SC)
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Director, Special Education Every 3 weeks Special Education: $100 Meeting agendas, sign-in sheets, purchase orders Formation of committee Parent interest survey results, mid-year increase in parental involvement for Special Education students Impact survey, end-of-year increase in parental involvement for Special Education students


2013-2014

EPAC Members

In accordance with the administrative procedures established under Education Code 11.251(b), the campus-level committee shall be involved in decisions in the areas of planning, budgeting, curriculum, staffing patterns, staff development, and school organization. Education code 11.253(e)
  Lori Ann Alt - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Jeff Baldwin - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Valerie Braxton-Molinar - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Leo Campbell - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Violet Chavez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Jack Duncan - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Antoinette Farris - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Graciela Fierro-Santana - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Aurora Flores - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Laura Garcia-Beard - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Monique Garza - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Siobhan Garza - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Angelina Gonzalez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Annette Gonzalez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Cecilia Grajeda - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  April Granados - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  David Gutierrez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Neysa Hardin - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Liz Herrera - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Susan Hill - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Mercedes Jasso - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Anna R. Knight-Johnson - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Adriana Laguna - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Ida Leza - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Issidoro Lopez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Bertha Betty Luna - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Virginia Meza - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Armando Morales - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Miguel Moreno - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Leslie Nava - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Adriana Nevarez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Shawn O'Donnell - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Paola Osequera - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Jennifer Peterson - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Melissa Piña - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Elizabeth Ponce-Lugo - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Sebastian Quijano - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Daniel Ramirez - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Kristen Rincon - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Irene Rojas - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Yvonne Romero - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Gloria Savedra - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Patricia Severson - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Denise Triolo - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Ryan Trujillo - EPAC Member          6/19/2019
  Tina White - EPAC Member          6/19/2019